Register free!
Search
 
     

The Green Industry's Resource Center


Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 03-05-2014, 11:52 PM
TPendagast's Avatar
TPendagast TPendagast is online now
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 3,115
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaperCutter View Post
Water features are always going to be tough to model unless someone insanely skilled is doing it. I have one guy I use for my high end SketchUp work like that.

As far as outdoor kitchens, we do a mix of CAD and SketchUp. I'm an outdoor cabinetry and appliance dealer so we'll do the modeling and CAD support to help our contractors close the sale. I've found it to be a win-win.

I better off hand rendering for water features and outdoor kitchens, by the time I can make the program even remotely behave, I have it drawn
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-06-2014, 12:21 AM
headz77's Avatar
headz77 headz77 is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: PDX, OR
Posts: 569
What's the point of modeling a water feature anyways? It's not going to look anything like it, no matter how you draw it... I think most clients would understand that certain parts of the design are purely representative.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-06-2014, 02:40 PM
TPendagast's Avatar
TPendagast TPendagast is online now
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 3,115
What's the point of drawing up any plan or elevation at all?

Why not just hand them a napkin with magic marker marks all over it and say "this is what you are going to pay 65 grand for"


I built a quarter mile long water feature in utah, that looked exactly like the architects aerial view rendering and conceptual elevations.

It really depends on what level and price water feature you are building.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-06-2014, 04:18 PM
PaperCutter PaperCutter is online now
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 1,268
Quote:
Originally Posted by TPendagast View Post
What's the point of drawing up any plan or elevation at all?

Why not just hand them a napkin with magic marker marks all over it and say "this is what you are going to pay 65 grand for"


I built a quarter mile long water feature in utah, that looked exactly like the architects aerial view rendering and conceptual elevations.

It really depends on what level and price water feature you are building.
I think what headz was referring to was a natural-style water feature (pond, streams, etc). I explain to my clients that we never know exactly what that water feature is going to look like till we see the stone coming off the truck.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-06-2014, 04:28 PM
headz77's Avatar
headz77 headz77 is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: PDX, OR
Posts: 569
Thanks Papercutter- that is what I meant. And it's not that I won't do a water feature rendering to help sell the job. But they are so subjective that I would t judge a piece of design software based on this.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-06-2014, 04:47 PM
TPendagast's Avatar
TPendagast TPendagast is online now
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 3,115
Quote:
Originally Posted by headz77 View Post
Thanks Papercutter- that is what I meant. And it's not that I won't do a water feature rendering to help sell the job. But they are so subjective that I would t judge a piece of design software based on this.
Posted via Mobile Device
Ive had an used Pro Landscape since 2001.

I'm not judging it, Im simply point out it's short falls…. all of them have some… the main reason why don't use the other ones, is because I don't like or wouldn't want to deal with their short falls.

I've run the program for 13 years, I think I can comment on pros and cons.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 03-06-2014, 09:00 PM
PaperCutter PaperCutter is online now
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 1,268
Quote:
Originally Posted by TPendagast View Post
Ive had an used Pro Landscape since 2001.

I'm not judging it, Im simply point out it's short falls…. all of them have some… the main reason why don't use the other ones, is because I don't like or wouldn't want to deal with their short falls.

I've run the program for 13 years, I think I can comment on pros and cons.
Just curious, are you using the plan drawing functionality of Pro or the photo manipulation thing? I haven't tried it for the CAD side, I'm way too comfortable with AutoCAD to switch and I won't bite on something they won't let me demo first. Plus I have zero interest in the photo editing side.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 03-06-2014, 10:10 PM
TPendagast's Avatar
TPendagast TPendagast is online now
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 3,115
I use plan drawing much much more than the photo rendering.

Ive used the photo rendering about 5 times to sell jobs…
almost always 24 x 36 ArchD plans.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.com™ - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:34 AM.

Page generated in 0.09348 seconds with 9 queries