Register free!

Reply
 
Thread Tools   Display Modes
  #11  
Old 05-25-2014, 08:32 PM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Chesapeake beach
Posts: 5,495
Put two pallets down side by side. Put one standing up on each end drive a stake through the pallet to keep it up right.

Split them and stack them inside the pallets. Full cord easily measured right there. Then let them sit and season until you sell it.

Friend has this done all the way around his mulch yard. When he gets an order they drive over and load skid bucket up and dump it in the trailer. He sells about 100 cords a winter
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-25-2014, 08:34 PM
Mowingman's Avatar
Mowingman Mowingman is offline
LawnSite Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,528
I recently got out of the firewood business due to health issues. I was getting $280/cord, plus a $70.00/cord delivery fee here. That price was for Oak and Pecan wood. I got more for Hickory as it is scarce here. Wood was allowed to dry for about a year after splitting, before it was sold.
__________________
Work Safe
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-25-2014, 08:38 PM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Chesapeake beach
Posts: 5,495
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mowingman View Post
I recently got out of the firewood business due to health issues. I was getting $280/cord, plus a $70.00/cord delivery fee here. That price was for Oak and Pecan wood. I got more for Hickory as it is scarce here. Wood was allowed to dry for about a year after splitting, before it was sold.
It gets cold enough in Texas people have fire places? Never knew that lol
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05-25-2014, 08:39 PM
grandview (2006)'s Avatar
grandview (2006) grandview (2006) is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Lancaster N.Y.
Posts: 3,480
Quote:
Originally Posted by whiffyspark View Post
It gets cold enough in Texas people have fire places? Never knew that lol
Posted via Mobile Device
More like they have trees there?
__________________
www.grandviewlandscaping.com
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 05-25-2014, 08:40 PM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Chesapeake beach
Posts: 5,495
Quote:
Originally Posted by grandview (2006) View Post
More like they have trees there?
That might be why he's getting that much a cord. Were at 300 for 2 with free delivery
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 05-25-2014, 10:44 PM
Mowingman's Avatar
Mowingman Mowingman is offline
LawnSite Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,528
This is why wood is expensive here. In fact, no, we do not have much wood here. I was hauling wood 110 miles from up in SE Oklahoma. I had several cutters up there that cut and split the wood, and loaded trailers I left at their places. I would take up one empty trailer and bring back the other trailer loaded. I hauled 5 cords/load.



Quote:
Originally Posted by grandview (2006) View Post
More like they have trees there?
__________________
Work Safe
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 05-22-2015, 09:17 PM
MarylandGuy MarylandGuy is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ffrandl View Post
We stack all the wood and cover it and let it set for 3 to 6 months before we sell. We ran into issues with moisture content and got gripped out for it so I invested in a $20 moisture content tool to make sure the wood has 15% or less water before delivery. One customer waited last minute and wanted wood delivered next day. (Hes the one that caused me to get the moisutee checker) when ee delivered, it was raining he pulled his guage and due to the rain the woods moisture content was high and told me to take it back very annoying but anyway live and learn.
Posted via Mobile Device[/i][/size]
No sense using a moisture meter if you are only seasoning the wood 3 to 6 months. There is no way the wood is even close to 20% moisture in that amount of time.

If you are using the moisture meter accurately, it won't matter if it's raining when you perform the test. It wouldn't even matter if you dropped a split in a bucket for a few hours and then took a reading.

It sounds like you are picking up a split and jabbing it with the moisture meter. If so, that explains why you are getting 20% moisture readings. Wood dries from the outside in. So the outside of the wood may be 20% after a few months, the inside is over 40%. Especially oak.

The proper way to use a moisture meter is to grab a piece of firewood and split it down the center. Then stick the moisture meter in the fresh split of the wood. At that point you will know the true moisture of your wood. Testing the outside of a split after it has been out in the sun and wind is useless.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Layout Style:





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.com™ - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:13 AM.

Page generated in 0.06466 seconds with 10 queries