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Old 06-27-2014, 09:02 PM
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Keegan Keegan is offline
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need help

Back in late April I put down a 1/2 yard of topsoil where a tree was removed and the stump ground up. I took up most of the wood chips left behind. I seeded it and it germinated. Customer watered daily. The seed never grew more than an inch. A couple of weeks ago the grass began to die and now is just about completely dead.

Any ideas what happened? Could it be the carbon from the wood chips?
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Old 06-27-2014, 09:16 PM
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JCLawn and more JCLawn and more is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keegan View Post
Back in late April I put down a 1/2 yard of topsoil where a tree was removed and the stump ground up. I took up most of the wood chips left behind. I seeded it and it germinated. Customer watered daily. The seed never grew more than an inch. A couple of weeks ago the grass began to die and now is just about completely dead.

Any ideas what happened? Could it be the carbon from the wood chips?
How deep is the topsoil? What quality is the top soil?
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Old 06-27-2014, 09:17 PM
TTS TTS is offline
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What kind of tree? If it was pine theyre very acidic causing very poor growing conditions. Even worse if those wood chips laid on the ground for a while. We use pine chips on trails on our property to keep weeds down
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Old 06-27-2014, 10:03 PM
windflower windflower is offline
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lack of nitrogen
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Old 06-27-2014, 10:04 PM
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phasthound phasthound is offline
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If the remaining wood chips were mixed with the topsoil, the decomposing microbes will sequester N and hinder the growth of new seedlings.
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The nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.
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Old 06-27-2014, 11:01 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is offline
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What was the source of topsoil? Had the soil been treated with farm chemicals? Pre-emergent?
Still--poor watering is most important cause of seeding failure.

If it was unusually wet--and hot--pythium fungus can kill large areas quickly. New grass is sensitive.
http://blogs.cornell.edu/horticultur...iseases-of-ny/
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Old 06-28-2014, 06:39 PM
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Keegan Keegan is offline
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How deep is the topsoil? What quality is the top soil?
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About 2-3" deep. The soil came from a local garden ctr
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Old 06-28-2014, 06:41 PM
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Keegan Keegan is offline
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Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
What was the source of topsoil? Had the soil been treated with farm chemicals? Pre-emergent?
Still--poor watering is most important cause of seeding failure.

If it was unusually wet--and hot--pythium fungus can kill large areas quickly. New grass is sensitive.
http://blogs.cornell.edu/horticultur...iseases-of-ny/
The soil came from a local garden Ctr. Who knows where they get it. It's been cooler than normal here in the northeast.
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Old 06-28-2014, 06:43 PM
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Keegan Keegan is offline
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Originally Posted by phasthound View Post
If the remaining wood chips were mixed with the topsoil, the decomposing microbes will sequester N and hinder the growth of new seedlings.
If this were the case which I'm thinking it is is there something I can add to the soil?
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