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  #21  
Old 07-16-2014, 05:53 PM
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irritation irritation is offline
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Originally Posted by RhettMan View Post
I still wonder if it is capable of finding a "drip leak/Very slow leak" in saturated soggy clay.
I seriously doubt it. Those slow main leaks are usually not that hard to find though. The wet spot should get you very close. Usually a male adapter at a valve or a glue joint.
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  #22  
Old 07-16-2014, 06:15 PM
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I seriously doubt it. Those slow main leaks are usually not that hard to find though. The wet spot should get you very close. Usually a male adapter at a valve or a glue joint.
agreed,

on another job today im faced with a large saturated area leaking mildew over the curb on both sides of the drive, out of a drain tile on one side.

makes me very curious to ask yall vet's in here:

What is the quickest/best way while diagnosing leak location: to eliminate the possibility of valve leak-thru in contrast to an actual main line leak? (when it has been left long term like this case and the area is large, with tight spray head spacing within the area.)

I wish there was someway to always be able to quickly illiminate the possibility of that scenerio from the leak diagnosis/locate.

especially on the higher zone # systems with many valves.
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  #23  
Old 07-16-2014, 06:26 PM
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irritation irritation is offline
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First thing is to know exact location of main and valves. If this is a large area that is wet and no clear indication of where it is originating than it may just be a case of overwatering or poor drainage.
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  #24  
Old 07-16-2014, 06:36 PM
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irritation irritation is offline
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Next is to put a good quality pressure gauge on the main and shut the main shut off valve. Even a drip will cause the gauge to drop in short time.
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  #25  
Old 07-16-2014, 06:58 PM
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RhettMan RhettMan is offline
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Originally Posted by irritation View Post
First thing is to know exact location of main and valves. If this is a large area that is wet and no clear indication of where it is originating than it may just be a case of overwatering or poor drainage.
one side of drive is just plain sloppy, the other is not so bad with the drain tile, but its got those "hair grass" growing in a perfect 20 ft circle pattern.

I dont know if yall have hair grass there (a name that i made up just now), it usually only grows in soggy material, evaporation septic type ground, and in wet ditches. If it wasnt for that hair grass, i bet i wouldnt even by eyeing that particular spot.

The weird thing about that area is that when proded with a rod, the ground has a texture that feels like......i guess whatever it would feel like if you were to probe a thick wet coarse mulch later....Pulling out produces no audible suction or trace of extreme wetness. This is the side with drain tile.

System Iso off, no meter roll.
MV-closed, slow leak meter roll <1/10 gal/min.
MV-open (via timer), zones closed, faster slow leak meter roll. maybe 1/4 gallon min.
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  #26  
Old 07-16-2014, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by RhettMan View Post
one side of drive is just plain sloppy, the other is not so bad with the drain tile, but its got those "hair grass" growing in a perfect 20 ft circle pattern.

I dont know if yall have hair grass there (a name that i made up just now), it usually only grows in soggy material, evaporation septic type ground, and in wet ditches. If it wasnt for that hair grass, i bet i wouldnt even by eyeing that particular spot.

The weird thing about that area is that when proded with a rod, the ground has a texture that feels like......i guess whatever it would feel like if you were to probe a thick wet coarse mulch later....Pulling out produces no audible suction or trace of extreme wetness. This is the side with drain tile.

System Iso off, no meter roll.
MV-closed, slow leak meter roll <1/10 gal/min.
MV-open (via timer), zones closed, faster slow leak meter roll. maybe 1/4 gallon min.

Mulch layer*
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  #27  
Old 07-16-2014, 07:24 PM
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irritation irritation is offline
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I never had much luck looking at meter movement. If you have a MV and sure it's tight than most likely it's poor drainage. Possibly the drain tile has been compromised in one or more locations.
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  #28  
Old 07-16-2014, 07:35 PM
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Nah,
that ho be leakin'

Last edited by RhettMan; 07-16-2014 at 07:41 PM. Reason: but....why dont you like meter movement?
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  #29  
Old 07-17-2014, 01:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irritation View Post
I seriously doubt it. Those slow main leaks are usually not that hard to find though. The wet spot should get you very close. Usually a male adapter at a valve or a glue joint.
I disagree my friend, been finding leaks for years. It's more about what you know and how you use your knowledge.

There's an approach one takes that makes or breaks a leak detection. Usually proving what's not leaking lead to what is leaking.

When using a listening device, the easiest way to accomplish this is by listening to spigots and exposed pipes/valves.
Posted via Mobile Device
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  #30  
Old 07-17-2014, 01:55 AM
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Lets see, first step in finding a leak. Make sure you actually have one, verify it. Irrigation gets blamed for everything.
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