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  #31  
Old 07-21-2014, 09:27 PM
JCLawn and more's Avatar
JCLawn and more JCLawn and more is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiffyspark View Post
Have you had proper alignment done? That truck is a pain in the ass. You have to grind out the slots to be able to adjust camber on them. A lot of people will just tap the receiver until it reads in spec because they don't want to do it
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Nope. I bought it last fall and he had new tires. First 10k prewinter was even wear, but once I loaded it down it Ayr the insides right out. I beat the thing to death this winter. I cracked the transfer case 3/4 around down the middle. Now I am pulling the motor and trans and doing a long list of things to it.
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  #32  
Old 07-21-2014, 09:36 PM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCLawn and more View Post
Nope. I bought it last fall and he had new tires. First 10k prewinter was even wear, but once I loaded it down it Ayr the insides right out. I beat the thing to death this winter. I cracked the transfer case 3/4 around down the middle. Now I am pulling the motor and trans and doing a long list of things to it.
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Doesn't necessary mean camber. Toe can do it as well. Caster won't affect tire wear.

We try not to drive loaded in the winter. I'll put a pallet of mag in trucks at site for traction. But they generally come out when were done.

Don't load spreaders either until we need to spread. I'm not shoveling them out lol
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  #33  
Old 07-21-2014, 09:41 PM
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JCLawn and more JCLawn and more is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiffyspark View Post
Doesn't necessary mean camber. Toe can do it as well. Caster won't affect tire wear.

We try not to drive loaded in the winter. I'll put a pallet of mag in trucks at site for traction. But they generally come out when were done.

Don't load spreaders either until we need to spread. I'm not shoveling them out lol
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I was getting payed $100 a hr to drive 200 miles round trip to plow 4 locations. It was a sweet deal while it lasted lol
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  #34  
Old 07-21-2014, 10:23 PM
burnthefurniture burnthefurniture is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiffyspark View Post
Doesn't necessary mean camber. Toe can do it as well. Caster won't affect tire wear.

We try not to drive loaded in the winter. I'll put a pallet of mag in trucks at site for traction. But they generally come out when were done.

Don't load spreaders either until we need to spread. I'm not shoveling them out lol
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Camber adjustments actually have a direct correlation on toe, so its kind of both. I learned a lot about this when getting my truck aligned for a leveling kit. I always thought the tire wear issue came from the extra positive or negative camber, and in extreme circumstances, it will, but the most comes from toe. Not an ASE certified mechanic, just what I've experienced for what its worth.

On another note, I'm glad we don't have plowing around here. Louisiana drivers are bad enough without ice and snow in the mix.
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  #35  
Old 07-21-2014, 10:29 PM
burnthefurniture burnthefurniture is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCLawn and more View Post
I kept using toe, its camber I am talking about. I run older trucks and its an issue with my 93 chevy 3500 extended cab diesel. This winter running a plow with 8k of salt in the back destroyed my front tires. On my truck the camber changes with the stroke of the suspension, I just don't know if chevy has fixed that with the new trucks. Engine break is awesome for saving breaks. You won't use the breaks on the truck unless you come to a complete stop. Anyways just giving a different angle to the conversation.

I know what you mean about the old body style chevy's with camber and suspension cycling. We have a couple of 99 one tons. When I jack up the front to do maintenance the front wheels literally do this /\. Maybe 1-2 inches of camber difference. I haven't noticed it as much on the newer truck, it may be like half an inch over the suspension cycle, so it may not be as significant of a problem.

Maybe similar in a way, but I do like the "grade braking" on the newer gas trucks, where the truck downshifts to keep higher engine revs and engine brake. I think its probably slightly different than exhaust braking, but perhaps the same concept. Gives a good bit of piece of mind for one...
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  #36  
Old 07-21-2014, 10:35 PM
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JCLawn and more JCLawn and more is offline
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Originally Posted by burnthefurniture View Post
I know what you mean about the old body style chevy's with camber and suspension cycling. We have a couple of 99 one tons. When I jack up the front to do maintenance the front wheels literally do this /\. Maybe 1-2 inches of camber difference. I haven't noticed it as much on the newer truck, it may be like half an inch over the suspension cycle, so it may not be as significant of a problem.

Maybe similar in a way, but I do like the "grade braking" on the newer gas trucks, where the truck downshifts to keep higher engine revs and engine brake. I think its probably slightly different than exhaust braking, but perhaps the same concept. Gives a good bit of piece of mind for one...
A friend of mine test drove a newer dodge with an engine break. He had it on high and said it about put him throught the window when it kicked in. If you arnt familiar with them, when you let off the gas the engine brake kicks in over a certain rpm. I don't understand how it works but it know it reroutes the exhaust through the engine a different way.
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  #37  
Old 09-03-2014, 05:21 PM
burnthefurniture burnthefurniture is offline
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Just an update. After consideration of this thread and several other forums, I decided to go with the SRW 3500HD D/A. Similarly equipped, I think I am going to find it more useful to have the additional payload/pin weight that it offers over the 2500HD's.

Truck has been ordered, and lead time on building is about 6-8 weeks. I will post pics when it gets here.

I appreciate everyone's responses and considerations, and hopefully this discussion might help someone in their future decision. I will report back how it handles the trailers versus the 2500HD. I'm also interested to see how the exhaust brake works.
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  #38  
Old 09-28-2014, 07:47 AM
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lawn king lawn king is offline
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I think you will be happy with that truck! I have a 3500 hd srw duramax/Allison I purchased new in 2008, the truck is all stock, works like a rented mule year round, hauls my 8000 lb. trailer/Kubota on a regular basis, and she runs great! Second only to my Isuzu npr, the dmax is the best work truck we have ever owned!
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  #39  
Old 10-02-2014, 10:37 PM
burnthefurniture burnthefurniture is offline
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Well, the truck showed up today! I was told 6-8 week build time. Then I was told it would be in on October 8, and here it is a week early. Needless to say, I'm impressed. From placing the order to delivery didn't even take a month! Anyway, I took these pictures at the dealer today, it is getting a line-X tomorrow then they'll be dropping it off at the shop. Looking forward to breaking this truck in!




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  #40  
Old 10-03-2014, 08:54 AM
PLLandscape PLLandscape is offline
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Nice truck.

I ran into the same problem when getting my 14k dump trailer. My dually is 12,600gvwr so a 14k trailer would put me at 26,600. At purchase I had my trailer de rated from the factory to 13,200 new certification labels and all. I don't know why I just didn't do 13,400 but I think I calculated it wrong when the dealer was asking me what I wanted. I lose 800lbs capacity (10,400 to 9,600) but I truly love the dually but was not prepared to make the cdl jump. But you are trying to get the max load so you thought it out well and made a good choice. I feel I need to make the cdl jump for myself but you limit actions a possible employee can do (if someone has them) if all your stuff needs a cdl unless you hire cdl drivers or have them get a cdl.
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