Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 10-10-2013, 07:37 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,746
Quote:
Originally Posted by foreplease View Post
I don't know what you put down in late August - Milorganite? - or at what rate, but I would like to see you hit it again with something. I remember you were talking about Milorganite at 1/2# N around the end of summer. Perhaps Ammonium Sulfate if the weather is cold. Better yet, something with a lot of potassium heading into winter. I amusing 22-0-22 fwiw. At 70% PPSCU it is more slow release than I would like but I only have one place left to do.

It would be much easier to decide if we knew what the weather from mid-April to mid-May has in store for us huh?
We really are too dry again here to expect much more brightening of the grass... with the trees and such it doesn't take long... I thought about adding fertilizer to this area that is all fast release urea, because those prills there now are NOT doing the job,,, IMO... The Milorganite was on a different lawn and when that one has extra water it looks great...
Either way, the weather would have to get wet quickly, because as was pointed out by a fellow mid-westerner our "Winterizer" is useless after the middle of Oct...

I think the ONLY slow release I use from now on is Milorganite in the Spring... If I need quick N from synfert then it will be quick N and no more slow-release...
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 10-10-2013, 08:32 AM
foreplease's Avatar
foreplease foreplease is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: St. Joseph, MI
Posts: 1,138
I understand these are your positions and opinions and, now, your experiences. Mine are different. Slow release fertilizers make my life and my customers' lives better. It is cheaper for them because I have to apply much less often. Their fields perform better for it and I believe I can use less total N for the year. Not all slow release products work the same way. On the other hand, I rarely use straight urea and if I use Milorganite (or other similar products) it is from late June to mid-August as I feel this is when it works best and it's relatively high cost can be justified. This is a different argument from whether or not N is needed, useless, or harmful in mod-Summer. I tend to agree with you that it is generally not a good time to apply N, but not always. And, even if I have not applied any in mid-Summer I generally have some working from a late May slow release application.

Your mention of grubs above brings up a good point. The packaging of Imidacloprid with fertilizer results in many people putting out N just to get the insecticide out. Schools and parks who are doing some of their own work don't give it a second thought. Most of them in my circle have no way to spray anything and are oly interested in granular solutions. They do not even understand how using the proper rate on one ties their hands on the other - they just think of it as putting 'Merit' down.

I understand it may be dry where you are but I'd venture to say it is drier than normal and rain can be expected. It is also cool and the days are getting shorter. Right now when I get more than 1/2" at a time it is staying damp longer than I would like. I think back to some of your posts from late July/early August saying damage from June 2012 on some of your lawns has not yet healed in makes me think - in a strictly helpful spirit here - you were not able to grow it in aggressively last Fall and may miss the opportunity this Fall. That is why, specifically, I feel you need to try to push it with N and K. I tell my places, who never seem to want to do anything unless it is during their 9-10 week sports season, that what we do this Fall determines how your athletic fields will look and perform next Spring.
__________________
Michigan PABL
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 10-10-2013, 08:52 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,746
foreplease, you mis-understand what I'm saying... I'm not talking about less N,,, it is all about timing... It would have been best for the grass if the N had gone into the soil with the 4 days of rain... the fact that prills have been laying on the ground since Labor day is frustrating...

We needed N to go into the soil since it cooled off in mid-August and becuz of slow-release it hasn't happened yet... does it make sense now???
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 10-10-2013, 09:03 AM
foreplease's Avatar
foreplease foreplease is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: St. Joseph, MI
Posts: 1,138
Well who snuck into your jobs and put down slow release when something else was needed? Kidding you.

I understand but I think you may be overreacting to finding these prills (granules). Seriously, if you spent an entire hour picking up the ones you can find would it even amount to 2 cups? Compare that to the total amount put down. Some of 'em are supposed to hang around if it was SCU or PSCU. Try a bag of MESA on one of your lawns late next May and see what you think.

But yeah, agree, if you want something to grow now, or 2 weeks ago, then having the N in place and plant available at that time is necessary. SOM is good on an ongoing basis but I do not believe it can give you the push that is sometimes needed in Fall as far north as we are.
__________________
Michigan PABL
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 10-11-2013, 06:50 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,746
Yeah you're right... the majority of the fert should've gotten into the soil... I hope...
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:35 AM.

Page generated in 0.05630 seconds with 9 queries