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  #81  
Old 07-01-2014, 12:00 AM
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TPendagast TPendagast is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snomaha View Post
There is risk in being solo too, although its a different kind of risk. Wouldn't you say a serious injury would be a risk to earning a living if you are solo?

Wouldn't you agree that there is something called calculated risk? I'm not advocating reckless - blind risk. I can mitigate risk by hiring smart people and having processes in place - I cant unbreak a leg and continue to earn money if solo.

No solo is TRULY solo unless it's his only source of income. A solo is just as much an entrepreneur as someone who employs, their risks are measured differently.

Mow on the side, and work full time elsewhere, is really just self employed on a second job.
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  #82  
Old 07-01-2014, 01:28 AM
cmo cmo is offline
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I'm the OP. Thanks for all of the responses. The way I know I'm an entrepreneur is that I am literally thinking about my business 24/7. Only two times I'm not thinking about how I can grow my business 1. Has something to do with my Wife and 2. While playing with my children (playing catch, reading to them, wrestling around.) I wake up thinking about it I go to bed thinking about it. I started a pest control company and a lawn service. My experience was with pest control, but I knew I would need a different business that could start bringing in a lot of cash immediately. I plan to scale the lawn care and hire a 2 man crew 50+ hours a week to run the lawn care, and I will focus on the pest control myself. (It's hard to find someone you can trust, and smart enough to pass a certification test.) Anyway back to it I risked everything to start this. 1. Good paying job 2.everything in my 401k 3. Put all of my family's savings into it so hopefully in 20 years I can leave my kids a Legacy of sorts not a 30 year congrats gold watch from some crap job.
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  #83  
Old 07-01-2014, 06:48 PM
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LawnMowerMan2003 LawnMowerMan2003 is offline
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I think I'm an entrepreneur

I read a book a while back called the "E-Myth". I should probably read more books by that author because I really liked it. It's not overly complicated; but I feel like I learned some things. It's been a long time since I read it, but the author discusses different personalities: Worker (I think there's another word), Manager, and Entrepreneur. Each person has a percentage of all 3, according to the book. If you have more of the Entrepreneur, you might be better at starting a business. This doesn't mean you will stay in business, however, if I learned anything. lol

I still feel that I have more of Entrepreneur than the other 2 personalities (if that's the correct word). That's why I'm trying to start my lawn service again. Have I thought of other businesses? Yes, I do all the time, but there are things I really like about the lawn service business, which most of you probably already know. And I have the most experience with this business as well.

I did take a substantial risk to start my business. I think I spend under $500, so that doesn't sound substantial, but that was almost all that I had saved up, so to me it was a big risk. My girlfriend said "What if you spend that money on equipment and don't get any customers?" That's never happened before, but it could, or I could get the customers and my truck could break down and then I would be out of business. But I'm willing to take the risk, even knowing that I have failed before, more than once.

I don't see myself mowing lawns by myself, with a push mower, until I retire. I see a potential for me to keep growing my business. Sure, maybe all I've done at this point is created a job for myself, but is the first step, for me. Not everybody has to start out with nothing, but that's one thing I think an entrepreneur can do. He can start with nothing, or almost nothing, and build from there. Most people (I think) don't see a lawn service as having much potential, but I disagree.
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  #84  
Old 07-01-2014, 07:55 PM
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snomaha snomaha is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPendagast View Post
No solo is TRULY solo unless it's his only source of income. A solo is just as much an entrepreneur as someone who employs, their risks are measured differently.

Mow on the side, and work full time elsewhere, is really just self employed on a second job.
Isn't that what I said??? - "there is a risk in being solo too, although it's a different kind of risk".

We will agree to disagree on business owner vs entrepreneur.

By the way, I had additional jobs when I first started out - never thought of myself as an entrepreneur until I learned a few things about business, finances, networking, leadership....
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  #85  
Old 07-01-2014, 08:06 PM
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LawnMowerMan2003 LawnMowerMan2003 is offline
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Aren't your risks higher when solo?

Quote:
Originally Posted by snomaha View Post
Isn't that what I said??? - "there is a risk in being solo too, although it's a different kind of risk".

We will agree to disagree on business owner vs entrepreneur.

By the way, I had additional jobs when I first started out - never thought of myself as an entrepreneur until I learned a few things about business, finances, networking, leadership....
If you don't have any help, and you break your leg, for example, how can you keep your customers? At least if you had one or more employees they might be able to keep the work going. In my example of a broken leg, you might even be able to go with your 1 employee and supervise, if that was needed. Of course, if you were doing half (or more) of the work, that 1 employee still wouldn't be able to keep up, but it wouldn't be as bad as if you are solo.
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