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  #21  
Old 02-02-2014, 09:37 PM
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JonLawn JonLawn is offline
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How close can roundup get to a shrub and not hurt it?
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  #22  
Old 02-02-2014, 09:56 PM
twomancrew twomancrew is offline
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Originally Posted by JonLawn View Post
How close can roundup get to a shrub and not hurt it?
That can depend on a lot of things. % sprayed, time of year, temp, moisture etc. Also hostas and daylillies can't barely be killed with glyph so genus as well. If it gets on something quickly prune off the srpayed areas and pray. Any living bush beats no bush at all.
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  #23  
Old 02-05-2014, 09:22 AM
ArTurf ArTurf is online now
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Originally Posted by 2 Cycle View Post
This a job we all dread. Weeding in preparation for mulching or woodchips or whatever. Monotonous and beats on my knees. Then my buddy joe introduced me to the action hoe and that has been something of a game changer for hitting large beds. Are there any strategies you guys can recommend or tools or machines you use go get this done quicker and more efficiently? I have the stihl km 130 and would consider the cultivator attachment if you guys think it is worth it for quicker bed prep
Some have suggested the use of herbicides to control weeds before and after the the mulch. I am going to guess and say you are probably not knowledgeable or licensed to apply these products. If you are then disregard the next statements. Whatever mechanical methods you use to remove present weeds I will let you decide but I will suggest to you not to use herbicides. The reasons being are not just the legal & moral issues but the fact you are not knowledgeable and may cause more harm than good giving you the appearance of incompetence.
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  #24  
Old 02-05-2014, 10:45 AM
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JonLawn JonLawn is offline
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Originally Posted by ArTurf View Post
Some have suggested the use of herbicides to control weeds before and after the the mulch. I am going to guess and say you are probably not knowledgeable or licensed to apply these products. If you are then disregard the next statements. Whatever mechanical methods you use to remove present weeds I will let you decide but I will suggest to you not to use herbicides. The reasons being are not just the legal & moral issues but the fact you are not knowledgeable and may cause more harm than good giving you the appearance of incompetence.
Here's the thing. I am certified in fertilizer and pesticides. However, in Maryland anyway, the tests/study material do NOT cover what to put down and when and for what. They are much more safety/reporting/laws/calibrating/labeling etc. So while I am certified and legal, I am here and asking questions to gain more knowledge. Thanks for the help.
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  #25  
Old 02-05-2014, 03:24 PM
twomancrew twomancrew is offline
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Originally Posted by JonLawn View Post
Here's the thing. I am certified in fertilizer and pesticides. However, in Maryland anyway, the tests/study material do NOT cover what to put down and when and for what. They are much more safety/reporting/laws/calibrating/labeling etc. So while I am certified and legal, I am here and asking questions to gain more knowledge. Thanks for the help.
No doubts man, call the extension office and tell them what you would like to know. They are there for commercial as much as the average homeowner. They are there to educate everyone and it's free.

When I certified I felt the same way. It's not about product knowledge and the fact anyone says it is make me wonder about them. Maybe they took a class. The 3-OT in IA was 2 books and nothing in there was product-anything. That's not what it was about. I can goto a day class annually or re-test biannual. I re-test, so easy.
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  #26  
Old 02-05-2014, 07:13 PM
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rob7233 rob7233 is offline
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right...which is why i said "weedeat" after roundup
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Wouldn't this lead to an R/U uptake failure? QuickPro isn't even rainfast until 3 hours...

Maybe R/U after cutting them down with a trimmer first would be best.

Better to first pull any large ones that are flowering or already to seed since they are actively reproducing and the process of mulching may disrupt the Pre-em application "blanket".
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  #27  
Old 02-05-2014, 07:21 PM
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rob7233 rob7233 is offline
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How close can roundup get to a shrub and not hurt it?
Sometimes I've had to use an aluminum "scoop" shovel to act as a physical barrier when I need to get close. Non target drift depends on many factors.
Get some formal education on it.
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  #28  
Old 02-05-2014, 07:24 PM
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rob7233 rob7233 is offline
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Originally Posted by twomancrew View Post
No doubts man, call the extension office and tell them what you would like to know. They are there for commercial as much as the average homeowner. They are there to educate everyone and it's free.

When I certified I felt the same way. It's not about product knowledge and the fact anyone says it is make me wonder about them. Maybe they took a class. The 3-OT in IA was 2 books and nothing in there was product-anything. That's not what it was about. I can goto a day class annually or re-test biannual. I re-test, so easy.
When you go to your county Extension office for advice, state that you are a commercial guy and not an homeowner. That way you can be directed to the Commercial Extension agent.
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  #29  
Old 02-05-2014, 07:58 PM
sharperimagelawns sharperimagelawns is offline
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I use the weedeat and spray method whenever possible b/c its just so much faster is usually all the same in the customers eyes. they generally only care about the finished product. I honestly find that sometimes its worth taking the risk of overspray b/c it is easier and cheaper to just pick up a new $10.00 plant next time your at the nursery and spend 10 min replacing the dead or dying one than it is to spend hours hand weeding. Don't get me wrong, I don't just carelessly fly through the beds dousing everything with roundup, I actually am really careful but Im just making the point that on the rare occasion that I do kill a plant its not the end of the world. USUALLY! Knowing your customers and knowing the price of the plants your working around is important. Obviously some customers are not going to want you to use this method, and obviously don't take the chance around a $300 jap maple. Just have to use your brain a little. I DO NOT allow employees to do the round up spraying!
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  #30  
Old 02-06-2014, 09:44 AM
ArTurf ArTurf is online now
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Originally Posted by JonLawn View Post
Here's the thing. I am certified in fertilizer and pesticides. However, in Maryland anyway, the tests/study material do NOT cover what to put down and when and for what. They are much more safety/reporting/laws/calibrating/labeling etc. So while I am certified and legal, I am here and asking questions to gain more knowledge. Thanks for the help.
Ok, I understand the part about being certified and not really knowing what to do.

Here is the way I go about weed control in flowerbeds. As far as removing the existing weeds-string trimmer, hand pulling/trimming, lopers, whatever it takes as the situation requires.

Pre-emergents; Gallerry(isoxaben), prodiamine & others. Realize you cannot apply pre's if you are planting new plants within certain time limits. Check labels.

Post-glyphosate, diquat, hand pulling.

Do a search for herbicides in flowerbeds or start a thread in the Herbicide forum to learn more.

We do a program and service at regular intervals spot spraying and hand pulling.

Realize weed control anywhere is a combination of ALL practices, proper mulching, watering spacing of plants & etc. After a certain point I do not use pre's and can control weeds with good maintenance practices.

The thing I preach is don't let them get out of hand and then expect miracles.
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