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  #311  
Old 03-20-2014, 02:36 PM
Bryan27 Bryan27 is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turboguy View Post
When it comes to end of the year models another thing to consider is that if you trade every two years without running up a lot of miles you might want to pass on the clearing out of old models. What you save buying one of last years you may lose when you trade it back in.

However if you are like I am and run what you buy until the wheels fall off then that is real savings. I have put over 400,000 miles on some of my vehicles.
I'm a big fan of driving them till the wheels fall off too! I don't drive near as much as I used to so my '06 truck only has 85k on the odometer and I'm past the point in my life where I fall in love with a car, I still like my truck and there's not a thing wrong with it, so I don't see me getting rid of it anytime soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Landscraper1 View Post
I don't get rid of a truck until I get at least 10 yrs out of it. At that point, I usually sell it, myself. I only trade in if there is am incentive (like getting $2000 over Blue Book) or if I know the truck has problems. If I sell it, it's because I feel it's a sound truck.
I usually sell them on my own too. The only advantage of trading is that it reduces the taxes owed on the new vehicle. If you pay 7% sales tax, the dealer would have to pay you within 7% of what you could sell it for privately in order for you to break even, it's a rare occasion that a dealer is going to be that close to retail on trade in value. I give them the opportunity to buy my old vehicle and if they get close to my break even point I'd let them have it just so I don't have to hassle with selling it myself, but usually we're a few thousand apart on that.
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  #312  
Old 03-20-2014, 09:06 PM
cpllawncare's Avatar
cpllawncare cpllawncare is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 2,647
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymtnnut View Post
This is not the situation that it is being applied to it was for a small guy getting started with a push mower. You already had a commercial mower but so you have a extra mower use it,and let it motivate yourself to get it more work. That happens in business. It's a much better scenario to have a mower that doesn't get used everyday than a Harley that gets ridden everyday.
Business comes and goes bad years good years you get the point . When it's paid for it doesn't hurt you to grow into it. I know it's not ideal but it's also NOT the end of the world.
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For sure it motivates me to get more work, but I hate the thought of not being able to use it everyday, I feel like I made a bad move, which from a business standpoint I did, I WILL grow into it, just hasn't been as quick as I thought it would be. The thing is, one can get a another mower at almost a moments notice if need be, so it's wiser to WAIT until you absolutely need it. Had the maint side of the business grown as I thought it would, it would be in the field everyday by now. I definitely don't have a harley as of now, LOL but I get your point. I always use the saying " If the blades aren't turnin it ain't earnin" so when it sits it aint earnin LOL.
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  #313  
Old 03-21-2014, 09:06 PM
rockymtnnut rockymtnnut is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: cincinnati ohio
Posts: 207
One mistake I've made is when I bought a piece of equipment I didn't keep track of how much money that particular mower made each day or how much it made over a year. Especially when I was solo. I would think a walk behind should earn around 80 to 90 thousand during its life.
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  #314  
Old 03-22-2014, 12:55 AM
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cpllawncare cpllawncare is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 2,647
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymtnnut View Post
One mistake I've made is when I bought a piece of equipment I didn't keep track of how much money that particular mower made each day or how much it made over a year. Especially when I was solo. I would think a walk behind should earn around 80 to 90 thousand during its life.
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I think solo's and small up and coming companies are prone to this mistake, that first growth surge can be misleading, because you don't really know what to expect and you try to anticipate the future. We need a landscapers oracle, LOL
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