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  #11  
Old 04-10-2013, 11:26 AM
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Leeg83 Leeg83 is offline
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So whats the average cost for install on 1 cubic yard?
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  #12  
Old 04-11-2013, 10:50 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Originally Posted by Snyder's Lawn Inc View Post
I think its the other way around Rookie and lowballers never remove mulch.
When you remove the mulch you can treat them areas for grubs and other pest since its hard to treat them areas when the mulch is there.
Sometimes the removal of some off the older mulch gives room for new mulch to lay.
Like on tree rings to much build up can be a bad thing to a tree. ...
I agree if you have an Infestation some disease problems,,, but normally the decaying of mulch does more for garden beds than anything else you can do... Botanists, horticulturalists and Soil people ALL understand that if they have any understanding of their field at all...

Also agree that no one should ever pile up around the crown of the trees or bushes...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #13  
Old 04-11-2013, 11:20 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Originally Posted by Leeg83 View Post
So whats the average cost for install on 1 cubic yard?
My point is:
Every situation is so different,,, if you want to do it for the best possible advantage for each plant/bed that selling your services by the yard,,,is an inaccurate measurement... JMO...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #14  
Old 04-11-2013, 07:13 PM
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wildstarblazer wildstarblazer is offline
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I'm gonna stir up the pot even more with this comment. Some say to take out the old mulch because as it decays it turns into top soil which can eventually become too high and can lead to a situation where the plants are now planted too low and could cause them to rot.
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  #15  
Old 04-11-2013, 08:00 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Originally Posted by wildstarblazer View Post
I'm gonna stir up the pot even more with this comment. Some say to take out the old mulch because as it decays it turns into top soil which can eventually become too high and can lead to a situation where the plants are now planted too low and could cause them to rot.
Untrue...

As long as you're NOT hilling up the mulch around the base of the plant, or piling 2" of fresh mulch on top of 3" of partially decayed mulch which is already on an inch of compostted mulch,,, that scenario never happens...
That is why Professional LCOs have to make the decision how much to put down after cleanup in the various and sundry locations about the bed... that provides the picture of why selling your services by the yd. has little or no, meaning...

If I remove a couple inches of surface mulch while cleaning out the normal debris,,, then I calculate a couple inches of 'Fresh Mulch' to replace it for the Summer...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #16  
Old 04-11-2013, 11:22 PM
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Snyder's Lawn Inc Snyder's Lawn Inc is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildstarblazer View Post
I'm gonna stir up the pot even more with this comment. Some say to take out the old mulch because as it decays it turns into top soil which can eventually become too high and can lead to a situation where the plants are now planted too low and could cause them to rot.
I seen this happen
I seen termites in the decay mulch. I had a new customer wanted me install rock and as I cleaning mulch out of the bed and it was coming up in slabs I notice Termites under the mulch.

I bet when people treat for grubs they only treat lawns and not the beds.
If you have mole problems. The moles will live in the mulch beds and there will be grubs and other food source under the mulch. That's why its good practice to remove the mulch.

To OP you heard both side of the issue. Don't cut corners do it right first time.
You have to pick witch way is the right way
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  #17  
Old 04-12-2013, 08:05 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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We might be too far north for those termite issues, or perhaps we don't put it on so thick...
It should not be allowed to turn into slabs of rotted material as that indicates too thick of a layer of fresh material was placed down without ever being 'freshened up'... when freshening up the old, before the new layer is put down it should be rotted crumbles, not slabs...
The idea is to mimick the forest floor(only cleaner) rather than eliminate it...

Eventually the soil becomes so rich and the plantings become so vibrant that the ground disappears... THAT,,, is the ultimate goal...

I had one struggling bed that was finally enriched with the decaying mulch to the point that,,, we were just a couple of seasons away from having that type of growth filling in so much as to cover the ground,,, when a crew came through and cleaned up everything down to the bare dirt... the plants began drying out again, some even died and their grith was shrinking again rather than expanding, etc., etc...

There is no perfect system but when you take away rich root zone from the plant becuz you're afraid of bugs,,, I don't believe you're caring for the plants adequately... anything is bad when taken to the extreme, and 4" of mulch is definately extreme...
When Spring cleaning the old mulch and freshening it up,,, all it takes is a 'sprinkling of new mulch in the critical places to keep it looking good and aerating the layers to prevent slabs,,, as discussed earlier...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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