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  #11  
Old 06-17-2014, 08:20 PM
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Snyder's Lawn Inc Snyder's Lawn Inc is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by americanlawn View Post
Every once in a while we will seed with "Blue Ribbon" (4-way Kentucky bluegrass). And very rarely we seed with fine fescue. Main reason is to exactly match "certain" lawns.

But I'm guessing over 98% of our seeding jobs = a 4-way blend of TTTF (turf-type tall fescue). It's the "new wave" in grass seed. ISU seeded over 100 TTTF cultivars in test plots at their research farm 2 years ago. ISU's 2 top turfgrass experts even have TTTF in their home lawns.

http://www.iaturf.blogspot.com/2012_09_01_archive.html

TTTT was initially suggested to me by a good friend in KS. (grassman). Followed up shortly after that by Iowa State University. Now I swear by it, and most customers are very pleased with it.
I only seed with a 5 Blend mix Turf Fescue doing this for atleast 20 years
Last lawn I installed the customer was mowing it in 2 weeks His new neighbor ask him if it was sod. This the 4th week I need get over there take a pic of it
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  #12  
Old 06-18-2014, 06:30 PM
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americanlawn americanlawn is offline
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Sounds great Snyder.

Iowa State often seeds their test plots in the middle of summer (full sun). Sounds weird, but they irrigate twice a day, and it always works, but they have good soil. I have 2 fairly large seeding jobs to do this summer. Both are "tender lawns" (loam soil with plenty of shade). I want to seed these 2 properties in July or early August during a dry spell so the soil is dry, in hopes that the new grass emerges in time so it gets mowed several times before the leaves start to fall. These customers are aware of the factors involved. We'll see cuz not all lawns are the same.
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  #13  
Old 06-18-2014, 10:39 PM
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Snyder's Lawn Inc Snyder's Lawn Inc is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by americanlawn View Post
Sounds great Snyder.

Iowa State often seeds their test plots in the middle of summer (full sun). Sounds weird, but they irrigate twice a day, and it always works, but they have good soil. I have 2 fairly large seeding jobs to do this summer. Both are "tender lawns" (loam soil with plenty of shade). I want to seed these 2 properties in July or early August during a dry spell so the soil is dry, in hopes that the new grass emerges in time so it gets mowed several times before the leaves start to fall. These customers are aware of the factors involved. We'll see cuz not all lawns are the same.
Its been raining here with cool temps So things don't dry out very fast
Now we have a heat wave I have 2 New seeding jobs I like to wait till August but not sure customers wants to wait.
Started one today that another Lawn Company tried to seed it last fall He was cheaper then me last fall when I price this lawn.
Funny part the grade of the lawn look just like it did last fall. The other Company seeded it like The Home Contactor left it.
It was wavy, lumpy Needed 45 tons of top soil.
Installed the top soil and have it graded ready for seed. Then the customer now wants some landscaping done so now calling for rain So this project will be put on hold till have free time to make the beds and get the plants. Makes a person mad when they do this but more $$ is always nice.
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  #14  
Old 06-19-2014, 07:29 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by americanlawn View Post
Every once in a while we will seed with "Blue Ribbon" (4-way Kentucky bluegrass). And very rarely we seed with fine fescue. Main reason is to exactly match "certain" lawns.

But I'm guessing over 98% of our seeding jobs = a 4-way blend of TTTF (turf-type tall fescue). It's the "new wave" in grass seed. ISU seeded over 100 TTTF cultivars in test plots at their research farm 2 years ago. ISU's 2 top turfgrass experts even have TTTF in their home lawns.

http://www.iaturf.blogspot.com/2012_09_01_archive.html

TTTT was initially suggested to me by a good friend in KS. (grassman). Followed up shortly after that by Iowa State University. Now I swear by it, and most customers are very pleased with it.
We are too far north for TTTF and in forest lawns normal grasses do not compete well with weeds...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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  #15  
Old 06-19-2014, 08:55 AM
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A local high school spent $240,000 replacing poa supina on its football and practice fields 5-6 years after it was built. It was a very expensive seed (over $25/#) at the time and absolutely the wrong choice for a football field. If the price has come down it might be suitable for shade in the sense that other blues won't do well there. Just know it is aggressive and has poor color potential - 6 on NTEP scale if memory serves. I will be interested in how this does for your application of you try it.
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  #16  
Old 06-20-2014, 08:57 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Poa Supina is Shade Only... and does not have the Green Bay Packer "green" that people like to see in lawns,,, but is a pleasant bright green that looks excellent in shade...

The seed may seem expensive @ $25/lbs.,,, but the seed is so small that one likely gets 5-8 times more individual seeds than the same weight of a decent Fescue...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #17  
Old 06-20-2014, 01:16 PM
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americanlawn americanlawn is offline
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Many dwarf fescues (turf-type) are now labeled for as far north as southern Canada.
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  #18  
Old 06-21-2014, 08:55 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Zone maps have to do with individual climates, due to bodies of water, trade winds etc., moreso than latitudes... We've had our first Zone 3 winter since I've been in the business and some "tried and true" grasses didn't make it... Perhaps the new dwarf fescues will be good in Z3 or Z2, but we know that Supranova is a survivor, out competes weeds and looks good...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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