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  #41  
Old 10-06-2014, 09:47 PM
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ed2hess ed2hess is online now
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If some kawasaki models build up a lot of deposits and fail it would seem smart to use some adder in the gas. I have seen seafoam dissolve some crusty deposits on 2 stroke pistons. So has anybody used something in these new models and....got a couple thousand hours.
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  #42  
Old 10-07-2014, 10:58 AM
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RickyDL77 RickyDL77 is offline
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I'd like too add to the fuel debate.. every engineered thing has an issue or two or three.
Think of an engine as a human body, and fuel as food for the engine. Feed that freak of an engine low calorie food and it will deteriorate over time (87 octane). Feed it that same fuel and let it idle excessively and it will become fat and build up junk in it's veins. Throw in a narcotic (Synthetic Additive), and you might have a junkie over time, not to mention **** gets expensive.
Also, these things are not HD engines, they are gas... and no environment is perfect to run them in. It might say HD, but that's compared to a piece of crap homeowner engine.. not remotely comparable to a diesel for example. We live in the mid Atlantic, things will be hot and humid one day, cool and dry the next... sometimes in the same day. better to have the best quality fuel and oil flowing through that thing to help negate the negative effects of different conditions. They build most of these engines in "controlled" environments to provide the best results for what they call HP, then if they feel like it they will test them in real world conditions. They don't say run mid grade or better for nothing, they know already that their engines are "****". I'd like to call it picky myself. I don't know the science behind temperature and humidity and the effects past the fact of watching drag racing and nascar but it has an effect, even if a small one.

Another thing to consider is one bad habit is bad enough, start stacking them and it gets even worse. They start holding hands and crap, dancing around the weakest thing on that engine, talking mess till something breaks.

Something I would like to do one day is take a fairly new engine, any kind.. Take the heads to a machine shop and have them drill and tap a couple sensor ports into the heads, mainly a temperature sensor and a pressure sensor, preferably electronic. Run the different fuels and additives in different combinations and see what is going on for myself. We know from 2-cycle equipment that the crappy fuel burns hotter, enough to melt down pistons. But just how much is the difference in a regular gas engine?
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  #43  
Old 10-07-2014, 11:44 AM
ducnut ducnut is online now
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I've been told, by someone in the industry, that low-grade is the byproduct of higher-grade fuels and the refineries add a bunch of crap to it to make it burnable. The culmination of all the crap burning is the buildup we see inside engines, to include paraffin in carbs. Since switching my HHs to aviation fuel, I haven't had a single problem. For sure, we can't have planes suffering carburetion issues, while flying. But, it's no problem for stuff already on the ground to suffer.
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  #44  
Old 10-08-2014, 07:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickyDL77 View Post
I'd like too add to the fuel debate.. every engineered thing has an issue or two or three.
Think of an engine as a human body, and fuel as food for the engine. Feed that freak of an engine low calorie food and it will deteriorate over time (87 octane). Feed it that same fuel and let it idle excessively and it will become fat and build up junk in it's veins. Throw in a narcotic (Synthetic Additive), and you might have a junkie over time, not to mention **** gets expensive.
Also, these things are not HD engines, they are gas... and no environment is perfect to run them in. It might say HD, but that's compared to a piece of crap homeowner engine.. not remotely comparable to a diesel for example. We live in the mid Atlantic, things will be hot and humid one day, cool and dry the next... sometimes in the same day. better to have the best quality fuel and oil flowing through that thing to help negate the negative effects of different conditions. They build most of these engines in "controlled" environments to provide the best results for what they call HP, then if they feel like it they will test them in real world conditions. They don't say run mid grade or better for nothing, they know already that their engines are "****". I'd like to call it picky myself. I don't know the science behind temperature and humidity and the effects past the fact of watching drag racing and nascar but it has an effect, even if a small one.

Another thing to consider is one bad habit is bad enough, start stacking them and it gets even worse. They start holding hands and crap, dancing around the weakest thing on that engine, talking mess till something breaks.

Something I would like to do one day is take a fairly new engine, any kind.. Take the heads to a machine shop and have them drill and tap a couple sensor ports into the heads, mainly a temperature sensor and a pressure sensor, preferably electronic. Run the different fuels and additives in different combinations and see what is going on for myself. We know from 2-cycle equipment that the crappy fuel burns hotter, enough to melt down pistons. But just how much is the difference in a regular gas engine?
What oil do you run in those 100 wrights?
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  #45  
Old 10-08-2014, 08:19 PM
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RickyDL77 RickyDL77 is offline
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