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  #1  
Old 05-23-2005, 03:19 PM
JJLandscapes JJLandscapes is offline
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Cesspool is browning the grass

New customer has had the same part of her lawn get brown from her cesspool over the poast few years and she said she couldnt get it to stay green

Anyone ever deal with a problem like this and is there is anyway of treating the spot so it can stay green. I dont want to suggest her anything like Sod or top soil and seed if its not going to help
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  #2  
Old 05-23-2005, 03:56 PM
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GripB GripB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJLandscapes
New customer has had the same part of her lawn get brown from her cesspool over the poast few years and she said she couldnt get it to stay green

Anyone ever deal with a problem like this and is there is anyway of treating the spot so it can stay green. I dont want to suggest her anything like Sod or top soil and seed if its not going to help
I have a 2 tank system: 1st tank(1000 gal.) is solids and the 2nd tank(500 gal.) is liquids. I have the same problem, but around the 1st tank only
I planted seed; that eventually browned. I then did sod; that eventually browned also. So, I'd like to know wasup.
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Old 05-23-2005, 04:24 PM
freddyc freddyc is offline
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Its possible that the methane is coming up from the solids tank.

the other possible answer is that the soil is too acidic from the effluent gases.

Soil test and then maybe a curtain vent over the tank if necessary???

You said her system has been doing this for a few years....how old is the system and any idea what kind of soil was put over it?? When they dig for a tank they don't always be that careful and sometime its sandy in the top layer.
Any idea if the brown spots are near the cleanout riser or if it covers the whole tank area??
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Old 05-23-2005, 04:32 PM
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GripB GripB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freddyc
...and then maybe a curtain vent over the tank if necessary???
What's a curtain vent? My system is 3 years old and it's been this way since new...methane makes sense. Thanks!
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Old 05-23-2005, 04:53 PM
freddyc freddyc is offline
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A curtain vent is something you'd have to make up on your own.

Essentially, what I'm saying is that you might have to capture and vent the gas instead of letting it filter up through the ground. Thats also why I was asking if its a local browning or over the whole tank area. If its very local, a pipe in the ground might do the trick... if its widespread, then you probably have to somehow sheet over the area and direct the gas away. Then if its directed into a certain area, you could install a piping system much like a curtain drain leading to a standpipe.

In my memory, a cesspool as first described could just be a hole in the ground with some stone. No good way to separate the liquid/solids. It could be a 55 gallon drum with a few holes in it with stone around it which allows the liquids to disperse. In either case, its usually smaller than a newer 2 tank septic system and can be a lot less controlled.

One other question is: is it possible that the moisture is draining away from the surface and into the tank???
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Old 05-23-2005, 05:15 PM
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GripB GripB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freddyc
A curtain vent is something you'd have to make up on your own.
Sounds like a shi**y job But seriously, in my case it's not a cesspool, it's a round concrete tank and the browning area is the same diameter as the tank itself.
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  #7  
Old 05-25-2005, 07:51 PM
rokinrandy rokinrandy is offline
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hello everybody,i am glad i found a place on here where i can contribute..i have been plumbing for 15 years..i am not a turd chaser any longer i am a builder now but i will start by saying that this type of venting system you refering to as a curtain drain or venting a typical residential septic system in this manner is against b.o.c.a. and s.b.c.c.i. codes and could potentially cause problems.not only health and structure problems but including a potential law suit. .Brown or burnt looking areas in the grass over the leaching bed. This may indicate that the system is too full. Have the levels in the septic tank and the leaching bed checked by a septic contractor ..and yes their is methane and propane and all that icky stuff that will make you sick that is why those little pipes are on your roof..way up there so you don't breath that stuff and this stuff is combustable if not released from a plumbing system..i know what i said might sound crazy but i have seen a lot of crazy things since i have been plumbing..i hope this helps,randy
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Old 05-25-2005, 08:10 PM
rokinrandy rokinrandy is offline
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http://www.eco-nomic.com/indexsdd.htm http://www.plumbingworld.com/historyplague.html http://www.laundry-alternative.com/s...intenance.html ok i need landscaping help ..lol
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  #9  
Old 05-26-2005, 05:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rokinrandy
Brown or burnt looking areas in the grass over the leaching bed. This may indicate that the system is too full.
Randy,
In my case, the grass over the drain field is fine and matches the rest of my lawn; it's the grass above my 1st tank (solids) which is brown. The brown grass is the same diameter as the tank. The grass above the 2nd tank (liquids) is fine
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  #10  
Old 05-26-2005, 04:31 PM
freddyc freddyc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rokinrandy
hello everybody,i am glad i found a place on here where i can contribute..i have been plumbing for 15 years..i am not a turd chaser any longer i am a builder now but i will start by saying that this type of venting system you refering to as a curtain drain or venting a typical residential septic system in this manner is against b.o.c.a. and s.b.c.c.i. codes and could potentially cause problems.not only health and structure problems but including a potential law suit. .Brown or burnt looking areas in the grass over the leaching bed. This may indicate that the system is too full. Have the levels in the septic tank and the leaching bed checked by a septic contractor ..and yes their is methane and propane and all that icky stuff that will make you sick that is why those little pipes are on your roof..way up there so you don't breath that stuff and this stuff is combustable if not released from a plumbing system..i know what i said might sound crazy but i have seen a lot of crazy things since i have been plumbing..i hope this helps,randy




The indication is that is over the tank, not the leaching field.
If the tank is structurally sound, having a full tank should not really matter.

I don't know the local rules or regs in their area, but if it is indeed a methane issue (don't know if it is either) then venting it is probably the only option. I have no idea what you're talking about when you say structural problems??????

Also, health issues..... I'm not sure about your area, but septic venting is common in Massachusetts---residential or not. This seems to be especially true in newer, above ground (mounded) systems.
Even the landfills are vented.

Unless you're sucking on the vent stack I don't really see the issue... its just venting the ground area not directly to the tank. The vent through your roof is the path of least resistance (unless you have a poorly designed/installed system), and it should take care of any major fumes.

The person needs a soil test to start. If its methane, its probably displacing some of the oxygen in the soil. If the moisture is draining from the surface, then I think these people would have tried a load of watering already.

FYI, my neighbor had an improperly installed septic system... essentially, a home plumber installed perforated pipe between the house and tank. They snaked it out once a month or so but had the greenest lawn on the street.

I assume the people here know that their system is full or not. Also, theres two system types.... either or both could have a failed leaching field. This is an interesting subject though.
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