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Old 06-07-2005, 11:19 PM
AdamCByrd AdamCByrd is offline
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Location: Louisiana
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Pre-Emergent Weed Control

We're spending way too much time weeding beds by hand or by chemical. The best solution is to keep them from coming up in the first place.

Can anyone give me a little advice on pre-emergent weed control? Here are my specific questions:

What brands to use and what time of year to apply?

For above brands, are they safe around all trees and shrubbery? I wouldn't bother applying it near annuals.

What type of chemical works well when applied ON TOP of mulch. Many landscapes have fresh mulch (less than 6 months old), but still have ocasional weeds popping through. I don't want to remove mulch just to apply chemicals and return the mulch.

I would appreciate any advice.


Thanks,
Adam
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Old 06-08-2005, 11:40 AM
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GreenUtah GreenUtah is offline
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before we beat the dead horse about getting licensed to apply ANY herbicide(because that is what you are doing) in your state, let's assume you already know those risks and are properly insured and licensed to do applications in your area. For mulched areas, you will be looking for a granular preemergent herbicide that can carry to the soil level instead of bonding to the mulch. Now, before I continue, let me say that if your mulch is at proper depth, it should be doing a good job of blocking weeds on it's own. Most of the preemergents are just that, designed to control weeds yet to emerge. They will do nothing to weeds that have just been broken off or trimmed down(ie. grasses that are already coming through the mulch) Most people here have seen or used Preen, commonly sold at the big box stores as a shake out granular. It's pendimethelin based, safe for a wide range of applications(consult the label for the specifics of your area) relatively cost effective and fair at weed suppression. The area must be dry before application, so that the prills do not stick on foilage or mulch, then watered in to carry it to the target zone. There are more professional grade products out there as well, which I will not pimp here..lol..but that gives you the idea on where you want to go with that. BTW..if you have bulbs planted in any of these areas, preemergents will likely suppress them as well, just so you know.
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Old 06-08-2005, 11:03 PM
AdamCByrd AdamCByrd is offline
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Green Utah,

Thank you for the advice. Am I correct in assuming that it is too late to apply pre-emergent herbicide at this point in the season? As far as the license goes, I'm working on it. My state offers 4 ways to become eligible to take the exam. 1. Have 15 credit hours in horticultural / landscape areas. 2. Have a college degree plus one year full time work experience with a licensed contractor. 3. Have a highschool education with 2 years full time experience with a licensed contractor. 4. Have no education and 3 years full time experience. I am absolutely supportive of licenses to keep people from being unsafe or irresponsible with chemicals. However, I hope that you would agree that these criteria are a little on the strict side. There is a solution to my problem (college educated, don't have time or money to go back to school) though, and that's to go through another state that's easier, and then transfer that license over.

Thanks for your advice.
Adam
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Old 06-09-2005, 11:51 AM
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GreenUtah GreenUtah is offline
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Adam, actually, no, I do not agree that those terms are excessive, in fact, they are more lax than what I actualy would like to see, but that's a thread for another time. Licensing in another state only works if there is a reciprocal agreement between the states, meaning that they agree on certain standards and that people that pass in one place are eligible to pass there as well. This only gets you out of taking another series of tests when you go state to state, not skipping license fees or using more lax requirements from somewhere else not get in. That means if another state is more lax, their license may not even be valid in skipping testing for your state, you should investigate that thoroughly. To go back to the origianl question of it being too late, that all depends on the target. Certainly spring time is not the only time for germination! If you can get a kill or removal on existing plants, you can apply a premeergent at any time during the growing season for weed suppresion.
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Old 06-10-2005, 10:55 PM
Stonewall Stonewall is offline
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Adam,

Drop me a note and let me know how things are going.
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