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  #11  
Old 10-27-2005, 09:17 PM
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befnme befnme is offline
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thanks topsites for the info.
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  #12  
Old 10-27-2005, 09:21 PM
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sheshovel sheshovel is offline
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What you did not like my pic of where to cut?Don't you trust me?
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  #13  
Old 10-27-2005, 09:25 PM
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befnme befnme is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheshovel
What you did not like my pic of where to cut?Don't you trust me?

sorry i was between refreshing my page when i said thanks to topsites. thank you also sheshovel i had no idea what to do with it.what would happen if i take off 80% of the growth ?
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  #14  
Old 10-28-2005, 12:46 AM
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JimLewis JimLewis is online now
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Sheshovel is about right. That's about how much you want to trim off.

Cutting 80% of almost any plant or tree is a bad idea. There are a few exceptions. For instance, you can cut a Butterfly Bush or a Rose way back in the fall and they'll be fine. But for the most part, cutting back any plant more than 30% is a bad idea.

Here's what happens. When you prune a plant or tree (not including perenials, okay...) then the same percentage of the root mass dies back too. For instance, if you cut back 30% of the shrub, then 30% of the root mass will die back. If you go too far with this (e.g. 50% or 80%) then so much of the root mass dies that it leaves the plant succeptable to things like root rot and it will die.

Another reason you don't want to cut evergreen plants back that far is because usually only the outer 10% - 30% of an evergreen shrub has leaves or needles on it. The "inside" of the plant usually doesn't have any foliage. And if you cut off all the foliage, the plant has no way to complete the process of photosythesis, and usually won't come back. Therefor, you never want to cut anything back past the foliage growth line.
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