Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-16-2006, 08:45 AM
The Ranger The Ranger is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 208
Know Your N Cost

In a few threads recently posted price of fert was discussed. One mentioned since the cost of urea was so high might as well spread SCU. If you are pricing fert and you are comparing similar products (30% scu, 50% scu, or urea) you should compare the cost of N not cost of the bag. Example: bag of Urea costs 14.00. Each lb of N cost 61cents. Comparing that to a bag of
34-3-11 @ 14.00 the N in the 34-3-11 N cost 82 cents lb. When buying fert try to buy the best bang for a buck by buying the most amount of N for the least price in a similar product. Example: take a 25-3-5 for 14.00 (30%) and the 34-3-11 (30%) for 14.00, N in the 25-3-5 cost 1.12 while the other is 82cents. This is how you figure it....since fert is always in a 50lb bag, except for retail. Divide the N number by 2. The number you get represents the amount of lbs of N in the bag. Divide the cost of the bag by the number of N lbs = cost per N lb. And if you are comparing urea costs, urea is pretty much urea (prill or pellets)and Lesco has never been competitive on that product.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-17-2006, 09:16 AM
The Ranger The Ranger is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 208
Lets take it one more step....once you know your N cost you can figure how much it is costing you to treat per M (1000) sqft. in product. Since we normally apply 1lb of actual N per M then the cost to apply the 34-4-11@14.00 per bag is 82 cents per M. The 34-3-11 should cover about 17M while the 25-3-8 costs the same the amount of N in the bag and the amount of coverage is less. 25-3-8 is 12.5M@ 1lb of N per M or 1.12 per M. If you spread at less than 1lb of N per M this will drive your sqft cost lower. If you were spreading the 25-3-8 product @ 3/4 lb of N/M your bag coverage will go to 18.75 (lets just round it to 18) so your sqft cost drop to 77 cents. Spread the 34 product @ 3/4lb of N/M and your product cost per M drops to; .55 cents. You treat millions of sqft and the product choice can make a big difference in your costs. If urea costs about 14 per bag, 23M coverage @ 1lb per M (although it is difficult to spread evenly at this rate) you costs per M for fert are about .61 cents. Any comments to this post are welcomed.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-17-2006, 11:47 AM
ThreeWide ThreeWide is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Georgia Z7
Posts: 1,116
Very good information.

This can go yet another level deeper when looking at the cost of N.

I am often more concerned about how that amount of N in the product is derived. This may not matter as much depending on your turf and climate, but many times the real value is determined by how much slow release is included. This is where you get more bang for the buck so to speak.

If you look at 32-5-7 with 30% SCU, compare it to a 28-5-12 with 50% SCU. You may find that the total price per pound of N is lower with the 32-5-7, however 28-5-12 could turn out to provide more slow release per dollar spent. One would have to compare actual pricing, but that is just an example.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-27-2013, 06:56 PM
AllBrad AllBrad is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: somewhere south
Posts: 73
sub......................
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-27-2013, 08:17 PM
jc1 jc1 is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: The Real South Jersey
Posts: 561
You just subscribed to a seven year old thread and I replied to make it worth your while
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-27-2013, 08:33 PM
Above Par Lawns's Avatar
Above Par Lawns Above Par Lawns is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Blue Springs, Missouri
Posts: 511
I stumbled upon this thread yesterday believe it or not.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-27-2013, 11:33 PM
AllBrad AllBrad is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: somewhere south
Posts: 73
Well that means that i am 7 years behind. Just storing info for later reference. Thanks for the reply.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-29-2013, 10:44 AM
ted putnam's Avatar
ted putnam ted putnam is offline
LawnSite Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 4,137
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllBrad View Post
Well that means that i am 7 years behind. Just storing info for later reference. Thanks for the reply.
It doesn't mean you're 7 yrs behind.

It just means that good information is timeless.....
__________________
"The Poor Fish" circa 1930's: The Poor Fish wouldn't have been caught if he'd known enough to keep his fool mouth shut.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-29-2013, 06:04 PM
AllBrad AllBrad is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: somewhere south
Posts: 73
Great site. Thank you everyone for you wonderful information. Now if I could just figure out if Mop is bad for centipede I would be set.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-29-2013, 06:13 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllBrad View Post
Great site. Thank you everyone for you wonderful information. Now if I could just figure out if Mop is bad for centipede I would be set.
SOP or else potassium nitrate are safer sources of K for salt sensitive grasses. It might not matter much on soils that are so sandy that nothing is retained. I have to think about what I apply because my soils retain salt very well. The dogma about not fertilizing centipede much is related to the grass's reaction to having the wrong nutrient carriers applied to it. Keep in mind that centipede also needs an acid soil, lots of K in relation to N, not much P, and micronutrients. When centipede leaves turn purple, consider that a sign of possible K deficiency.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:51 PM.

Page generated in 0.09911 seconds with 7 queries