Register free!
Search
 
     

The Green Industry's Resource Center


Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-19-2006, 04:02 PM
tnmtn's Avatar
tnmtn tnmtn is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: NE Tn.
Posts: 991
side sloping track loader?

i am looking at a job to install a driveway on the side of a pretty steep hill. there will be a couple switchbacks involved going from the road down to the parking area. i was thinking about using a track loader with a blade attachment to cut in the rough grade. i was wondering what is the max slope that is safe to side slope a track loader? any info would be appreciated.
thanks,
metin
__________________
'78 Chevy C65 Dump
'94 F-350 7.3 IDI
Bobcat B300
Root Grapple
Box Blade
12" & 24" backhoe buckets
TT300E
Dingo TX425
GRI
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-19-2006, 05:45 PM
vntgrcr's Avatar
vntgrcr vntgrcr is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: southeast massachussetts
Posts: 282
Not sure what kind of soil you have but it sounds as though you need a real dozer, maybe a D3 or 4. The track machines are great but I can't see one actually cutting in a road from scratch. It might work, but your going to have to take very small bites and your time could be cut in half if not more with a dozer.
__________________
David Svarczkopf
Schooner Excavation/ Landscape Const.
Cape Cod, MA
1989 F800
2007 NPR Dump
2006 Kubota 161
2007 T190
toys in avatar
Dodge Ram 3500
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-19-2006, 07:34 PM
thepawnshop's Avatar
thepawnshop thepawnshop is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 387
I think 30 degrees is about the standard and max rating for side slope work.
__________________
Doug Brandt
Brandt Custom Homes
Roanoke, VA
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-19-2006, 08:27 PM
tnmtn's Avatar
tnmtn tnmtn is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: NE Tn.
Posts: 991
i had thought about a dozer. the ground is mostly loose soil, very soft. i was concerned that a dozer might have a tendancy to slide with the extra weight. also access to the area where it is at is pretty tough. i will have to park the trailer about a mile from where the work is. very curvy gravel forest roads. a house is not going to be built there. the land is used for a few guys to go hunting. they just would like to be able to pull their trucks off the road to where they will be out of sight. i appreciate the replies.
metin
__________________
'78 Chevy C65 Dump
'94 F-350 7.3 IDI
Bobcat B300
Root Grapple
Box Blade
12" & 24" backhoe buckets
TT300E
Dingo TX425
GRI
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-19-2006, 09:41 PM
Gravel Rat Gravel Rat is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 9,544
Your better off with a excavator mini or fullsize don't bother fooling around with a bulldozer or trackloader your way too limited. A 160 sized excavator could cut a decent road in a day even a 161 Kubota size machine can cut a road in easy.

We have some steep driveways here and I mean steep the one next to my place is so steep when they were building it they needed to lower the dump trucks down with a dozer. Another driveway I worked on was so steep the excavator wouldn't sit without sliding.

When your cutting into a bank or a hillside that is soft you need to cut in a good distance it should be minimum 10' wide it should be 14' wide. You will need to make sure the edge doesn't sluff off. You will need to get on the upperside of the slope and pull the material back and bench it.

Without pictures to see what your dealing with is hard to give you any ideas but like I said we have some of the worst driveways you can imagine here. Even concrete'ed tires will spin because its too slippery one guy I know has a driveway that is concrete is so steep he needs 4wheeldrive to climb it.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-19-2006, 10:32 PM
tnmtn's Avatar
tnmtn tnmtn is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: NE Tn.
Posts: 991
gravel rat,
the excavator with a grading blade was my other option. i am leaning more that way the more i think about it. just don't have a lot of experiance with track loaders and wanted to see if that might be an option. i'll probably stick to the tried and true method. also, if you are still missing your old idi ford mine is for sale. runs like a top.
take care,
metin
__________________
'78 Chevy C65 Dump
'94 F-350 7.3 IDI
Bobcat B300
Root Grapple
Box Blade
12" & 24" backhoe buckets
TT300E
Dingo TX425
GRI
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-19-2006, 10:37 PM
Gravel Rat Gravel Rat is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 9,544
The PSD runs good just aslong it doesn't break parts are a little pricey. I'am used to the bigger power now
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-20-2006, 12:27 PM
JDSKIDSTEER's Avatar
JDSKIDSTEER JDSKIDSTEER is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Down South
Posts: 1,153
Side Slopes

Quote:
Originally Posted by tnmtn
i am looking at a job to install a driveway on the side of a pretty steep hill. there will be a couple switchbacks involved going from the road down to the parking area. i was thinking about using a track loader with a blade attachment to cut in the rough grade. i was wondering what is the max slope that is safe to side slope a track loader? any info would be appreciated.
thanks,
metin
Go to www.skidsteer.com

John Deere has an excellent video on that site comparing all track loaders on side slopes. It may help you decide if a track unit will work for you.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-20-2006, 02:07 PM
Dirty Water's Avatar
Dirty Water Dirty Water is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Redmond, WA
Posts: 6,802
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDSKIDSTEER
Go to www.skidsteer.com

John Deere has an excellent video on that site comparing all track loaders on side slopes. It may help you decide if a track unit will work for you.
I don't believe that video for a minute. I know that people who are not used to pilot controls have a harder time going in a straight line, but how do we know the operator wasn't monkeying around a little to make the deer look better.

Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-20-2006, 03:37 PM
JDSKIDSTEER's Avatar
JDSKIDSTEER JDSKIDSTEER is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Down South
Posts: 1,153
Have you tried them both on same conditions on the same job site? The biggest problem I have seen is the weight distribution of the machine. Rear end heavy machines slide and that is a fact. If you have not done it you don't need to make statements like that.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:30 AM.

Page generated in 0.10050 seconds with 7 queries