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  #1  
Old 05-12-2006, 04:35 PM
Jnamo Jnamo is offline
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Nutralime help???

I have a client that would like me to put down some nutralime in her yard. She has a bag of this stuff from a few years ago and wants me to use it. From what I read on the bag it seems like something to be used with seed and not on an established lawn for greening purposes. I am in SE Michigan and her lawn is about 4500 sq ft. I just dethatched it last week and she has the usually lawn fert. guy coming once a month to spray. I think he came a few weeks ago. Any help is greatly appreciated-Thanks, Jeff
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Old 05-13-2006, 09:03 AM
upidstay's Avatar
upidstay upidstay is offline
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I don't see why applying one bag of Nutra lime on an established lawn would hurt anything.
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Old 05-13-2006, 09:56 AM
Jnamo Jnamo is offline
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Thanks, Jeff
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Old 05-13-2006, 07:48 PM
dallen dallen is offline
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If this is the Nutralime manufactured by ASC Mineral Processing or Mineral Processing of Ohio, you have nothing to fear. This is simply a finely ground limestone pelletized with a moisture dissolvable binder. It is rare that an over application of limestone will cause pH to increase too high. Most soils east of the Mississippi river are well buffered with fairly high OM and CEC numbers, although there are pockets of sandy soil. BTW, I developed this product about 25 years ago. In 1981 I was going for my MBA and did a marketing research paper on pelletized limestone used in agriculture. The results of that paper convinced me where the opportunity was, and the rest is history.
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Old 05-13-2006, 08:29 PM
Jnamo Jnamo is offline
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So does it really work? I have never used it or heard of it till the other day.
Thanks for the info!
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  #6  
Old 05-14-2006, 11:17 AM
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muddstopper muddstopper is offline
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dallen, since you are the developer of the nutralime, maybe you can explain just what it is about the product that is supposed to make nutralime better than regular bagged pulverized lime. I know of several people that will swear by nutralime, but I am one that will swear at it. When compareing the economics of the nutralime verses the powdered lime or ever normal pelletized lime, based on CEC and cost, and the amounts needed to balance my soil. Nutralime doesnt even come close. What am I missing?
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Old 05-14-2006, 12:22 PM
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Grassmechanic Grassmechanic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jnamo
I have a client that would like me to put down some nutralime in her yard. She has a bag of this stuff from a few years ago and wants me to use it. From what I read on the bag it seems like something to be used with seed and not on an established lawn for greening purposes. I am in SE Michigan and her lawn is about 4500 sq ft. I just dethatched it last week and she has the usually lawn fert. guy coming once a month to spray. I think he came a few weeks ago. Any help is greatly appreciated-Thanks, Jeff
Get a soil test before you add lime! You may be doing more harm than good by affecting the soil Ph! I'm in an area of Mi that NEVER needs lime. Every soil I've tested has high soil Ph. Yet, every now and then the homeowner will say they've always had their lawn limed
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Old 05-15-2006, 02:29 AM
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TurfProSTL TurfProSTL is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grassmechanic
Get a soil test before you add lime! You may be doing more harm than good by affecting the soil Ph! I'm in an area of Mi that NEVER needs lime. Every soil I've tested has high soil Ph. Yet, every now and then the homeowner will say they've always had their lawn limed
50 pounds of Nutralime spread over 4500 square feet would have little effect on the soil pH. Spread it and get it out of the lady's garage.....
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  #9  
Old 05-15-2006, 10:42 AM
dallen dallen is offline
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Nutralime

Limestone will affect soil pH by releasing calcium cations to displace hydrogen from soil colliods. Calcium will become available as the limestone particles dissolve. Limestone is a rock: rocks do not readily dissolve. Limestone must be ground into a fine powder for it to do any good. It all has to do with surface area and a finely ground material has a huge multiple of surface area relative to the same amount, by weight, of courser particles. Generally speaking, any particle too large to pass through a 60 mesh screen will never completely dissolve and further dissolution usually ceases after two years. Try to imagine spreading flour on a yard. Pretty messy! Now, pelletize the flour using a moisture dissolvable binder. The resulting product is much more convienient to use. While on a per bag or per ton basis, Nutralime is more expensive than regular limestone, it can actually cost less on a basis of "active material", or on a comparison of the super-fine, highly reactive particles per unit. Pelletized limestone has increased in popularity over the past 20 years for the exact same reason lawn care orgainizations have increased in popularity: CONVENIENCE. I attempted to send you a private email, but it wouldn't go through. Perhaps you might be interested in providing additonal assistance to the turf fertilizer project? I can be reached at <dallenascmfg@yahoo.com> or 217-474-0289. I would like to speak with you. Thanks, Dan
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  #10  
Old 05-15-2006, 11:55 AM
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Grassmechanic Grassmechanic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurfProSTL
50 pounds of Nutralime spread over 4500 square feet would have little effect on the soil pH. Spread it and get it out of the lady's garage.....
If he is in the same area as I am (soil Ph in the 7.8+ range), then yes, he will be contributing to a problem. If his soil is in the 6.5-7.5 range, he is OK. Why contribute to a potential problem just to "dispose" of a product is beyond me.
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