Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 08-21-2007, 10:39 PM
mishmosh mishmosh is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: OH
Posts: 42
I use a Turf hound core aerator. It spits out the cores. I remove the thatch/turf layer and keep the rest. Only goes down to about 3" but that depth is so money.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-22-2007, 11:42 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by sulston View Post
I'm just trying to learn as much as I can about organics and soil science because as of Sept. 2008 pesticides will be completely banned in my city, and the list just keeps growing here in Ontario of towns and cities that are following suit. It's just a matter of time here before organics or at least "pesticide free" lawns will be the only option in the business. So I'm just trying to gain all the knowledge I possibly can because if I'm going to offer organic lawn care I damn well better know how to do it right, which is why to this day my company has yet to offer it.
Something to consider as well. The organic approach should extend beyond what types of materials you use or don't use. IMO the end goal should be to create a low/no input sustainable system. With that in mind, it might be beneficial for you to look into ways of achieving this goal (if you haven't already), and the sooner you start applying the program the better, especially since you have a deadline. When moving from a conventional to alternative management program, it will be easier to mix the two approaches until your alternative program can support itself without conventional inputs.

Areas that will probably need attention in a landscape that has been conventionally managed in the past would be nutrient recycling, IPM, soil conditioning, irrigation management, xeriscaping with natives and other low water use plants, reduction or elimination of lawn where possible, etc...
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-22-2007, 05:28 PM
muddstopper's Avatar
muddstopper muddstopper is offline
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: transition zone
Posts: 2,343
Quote:
Originally Posted by sulston View Post
Good to know, thanks a lot. A&L is the lab I have near me where I'll be taking all my samples also. I was real curious as to how many people get the bioassay/biodiversity(not really sure the difference in those two) tests done as they're the real expensive ones, about $200 per test if I recall. Thanks for the info guys!

Sulston, I get the basic fertility test including micro Nutrients on all new lawn programs. This test does include the base saturation and total nutrient analysis. I have never had a bio assay or diversity test done. For my work, those type of test would just be an extra expense. 99.99% of my work is done in subsoil conditions where bio life forms just aint going to be in great numbers and I already know that microbial innocculants are needed. For the $200 cost of the bio test, I can just go ahead and buy the innocculant and apply it.

On older lawns, I will have the same basic test with micro's for the first testing, just to establish what I am working with. In most cases, micros arent an issue and I will concentrate on P,K,Ca,Mg,S. In some cases, I also have to look at Boron,Copper and Zinc. I very seldom have an issue with iron and have never had a problem with Na.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-22-2007, 06:38 PM
sulston sulston is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Southwestern Ontario Canada
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by muddstopper View Post
Sulston, I get the basic fertility test including micro Nutrients on all new lawn programs. This test does include the base saturation and total nutrient analysis. I have never had a bio assay or diversity test done. For my work, those type of test would just be an extra expense. 99.99% of my work is done in subsoil conditions where bio life forms just aint going to be in great numbers and I already know that microbial innocculants are needed. For the $200 cost of the bio test, I can just go ahead and buy the innocculant and apply it.

On older lawns, I will have the same basic test with micro's for the first testing, just to establish what I am working with. In most cases, micros arent an issue and I will concentrate on P,K,Ca,Mg,S. In some cases, I also have to look at Boron,Copper and Zinc. I very seldom have an issue with iron and have never had a problem with Na.
That is perfect mudstopper, much appreciated. Exactly what I was looking for.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-23-2007, 03:43 PM
poolboy's Avatar
poolboy poolboy is offline
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: earth
Posts: 2,148
Here are a couple of websites that you guys might be interested in. The guy that owns Nature Way Resources was on a local garden talk show last weekend.

http://www.soilfoodweb.com/
The are a few book you can buy under the products tab.

http://www.natureswayresources.com/
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:27 PM.

Page generated in 0.10012 seconds with 7 queries