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  #11  
Old 11-13-2007, 12:13 AM
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Marbleman Marbleman is offline
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The question still is what type of maple it is "bobcatnj"? To Marcos real Nurseryman in Connecticut do not dig Acer rubrum in the fall. If you go to a wholesale yard or nursery, you may find a left over from early spring digging, but you will not find one that was dug this fall.
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  #12  
Old 11-13-2007, 03:32 PM
Rtom45 Rtom45 is offline
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Back in the 70's when I worked for a nursery/landscape company we would dig and transplant maples throughout the year as long as the ground was not frozen. The only exception was in spring until the new growth hardened off. This was in SE Pa. Our trees carried a 1 year guarentee. We replaced very few trees.
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  #13  
Old 11-14-2007, 12:25 PM
Marcos Marcos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grasswhacker View Post
Here ya go Boy:
From Rutgers Coopertive and research extension:
Transplanting Trees andShrubs
Mark C. Vodak, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Forestry; Nicholas Polanin, Somerset County Agricultural Agent; and
Arthur J. Vrecenak, Ph.D., Former Assistant Research Professor in Horticulture
Deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs can be moved either in early fall or spring—except for some species such as thebirches, beeches, most oaks, magnolias, andhemlocks. These species should be moved onlyin early spring. Principles and Practice of Plant-ing Trees and Shrubs by Gary B. Watson, and E.B.Himelick, available through the InternationalSociety of Arboriculture, 217-355-9411 or onlineat www.isa-arbor.com.
It is important to maintain a proper balance be-tween branches and the root system whenever atree or shrub is transplanted. Trees or shrubs thatare to be moved should be prepared for the moveby root pruning for one or two seasons prior to themove. This will concentrate fine root growthwithin the root volume to be moved with the tree.
How To Dig
Size of Ball
Size of the soil ball should vary with size of plant.Root systems of plants differ depending on the typeof soil in which they are growing. Before attemptingto move a tree, remember that 1 cubic foot of soilweighs approximately 110 pounds and a 24-inchsoil ball weighs approximately 390 pounds.For shade trees, measure the diameter of thetree trunk 1 foot above the ground. Dig a ball Transplanting Trees andShrubs
Mark C. Vodak, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Forestry; Nicholas Polanin, Somerset County Agricultural Agent; and
Arthur J. Vrecenak, Ph.D., Former Assistant Research Professor in Horticulture
Deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubscan be moved either in early fall or spring—except for some species such as thebirches, beeches, most oaks, magnolias, andhemlocks. These species should be moved onlyin early spring. Principles and Practice of Plant-ing Trees and Shrubs by Gary B. Watson, and E.B.Himelick, available through the InternationalSociety of Arboriculture, 217-355-9411 or onlineat www.isa-arbor.com.
It is important to maintain a proper balance be-tween branches and the root system whenever atree or shrub is transplanted. Trees or shrubs thatare to be moved should be prepared for the moveby root pruning for one or two seasons prior to themove. This will concentrate fine root growthwithin the root volume to be moved with the tree.
How To Dig
Size of Ball
Size of the soil ball should vary with size of plant.Root systems of plants differ depending on the typeof soil in which they are growing. Before attemptingto move a tree, remember that 1 cubic foot of soilweighs approximately 110 pounds and a 24-inchsoil ball weighs approximately 390 pounds.For shade trees, measure the diameter of thetree trunk 1 foot above the ground. Dig a ballTransplanting Trees andShrubs
Mark C. Vodak, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Forestry; Nicholas Polanin, Somerset County Agricultural Agent; and
Arthur J. Vrecenak, Ph.D., Former Assistant Research Professor in Horticulture
...I hope you didn't type that all for my benefit!
I don't recollect ever losing a maple I've dug, at any time of the fall I've dug them. The only ones that were lost were from people 'drowning' them by watering them too much in general, or in one case from a deer tearing them up.

Again, people who sit in Universities are paid by grants to type up all kinds of recommendations in all kinds of areas, and that's fine I guess. But you have to agree that there is no substitution in the world for actual time-tested first hand experience!
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  #14  
Old 11-14-2007, 12:29 PM
Marcos Marcos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbleman View Post
The question still is what type of maple it is "bobcatnj"? To Marcos real Nurseryman in Connecticut do not dig Acer rubrum in the fall. If you go to a wholesale yard or nursery, you may find a left over from early spring digging, but you will not find one that was dug this fall.
That's a shame.
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  #15  
Old 11-14-2007, 01:27 PM
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grasswhacker grasswhacker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcos View Post
...I hope you didn't type that all for my benefit!
I don't recollect ever losing a maple I've dug, at any time of the fall I've dug them. The only ones that were lost were from people 'drowning' them by watering them too much in general, or in one case from a deer tearing them up.

Again, people who sit in Universities are paid by grants to type up all kinds of recommendations in all kinds of areas, and that's fine I guess. But you have to agree that there is no substitution in the world for actual time-tested first hand experience!


Yes, it is evident you are a legend in your own mind.
Maybe you should be a consultant to Ron Wilson on WKRC to share your vast experience.
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  #16  
Old 11-14-2007, 04:43 PM
Marcos Marcos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grasswhacker View Post
[/B]

Yes, it is evident you are a legend in your own mind.
Maybe you should be a consultant to Ron Wilson on WKRC to share your vast experience.
Ron Wilson is a friend of mine.
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  #17  
Old 11-14-2007, 05:19 PM
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grasswhacker grasswhacker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcos View Post
Ron Wilson is a friend of mine.
Good. Maybe he'll have you on sometime on the subject of transplanting maples in the North east.
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  #18  
Old 11-20-2007, 10:21 PM
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Travel'n Trees Travel'n Trees is offline
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I bat over 98% transplant all year yes even in the summer I learned alot in my life in this business. I am 40 years old. You have have tricks to cut my grass. I have secrets too move your trees. Even full summer. Everyone digs maples now, without a problem. Every zone is different call a local trasplanter. I think you are Ok use a big enough digger and in our you need the right kind to get deeper roots unlike vermeer and caretree which have there purpose. Just don't use a general 10-12 inch rule of thumb with these diggers.
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  #19  
Old 12-01-2007, 01:16 PM
flascaper flascaper is offline
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Man thats alot of info. what was the question?
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  #20  
Old 12-01-2007, 03:25 PM
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BrandonV BrandonV is offline
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buy new ones and don't take them from the woods, it'll be cheaper and survive better.
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