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  #11  
Old 12-16-2007, 04:53 AM
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Swampy Swampy is offline
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Originally Posted by JimLewis View Post
Yah, my thoughts exactly. I would never ever plant 4 bloodgoods in a row. In fact, I would rarely recommend having more than one in the same yard. They are specimens. They are meant to be a stand-alone showcase tree, not in groups. It just ain't right.

I think it would be wise to find another home for 3 of them. Until you are able to; they will be fine for a while spaced like that. They grow quite slowly.
Bottom line if thats what the customer wants thats what he gets. Though you are right.
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  #12  
Old 12-16-2007, 05:05 AM
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Bottom line if thats what the customer wants thats what he gets. Though you are right.
No. Not for this guy. I will do some odd stuff at a customer's request sometimes, if there's at least some resemblance of a good reason for doing it. But I won't do something that is just wrong or would make me look stupid to the neighbors or visitors to the house. That's my name on that job. I don't want people saying, "Now who did your back landscape? (Pssst...John...let's be sure never to hire those guys! )

Installing 4 bloodgood maples side by side is something I probably wouldn't do - even if they were paying me to do it. We're plenty busy doing work for people who trust our judgement and want a nice looking landscape than to have to stoop to working for idiots who want us to install landscapes that would just look goofy.
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  #13  
Old 12-16-2007, 10:25 AM
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FIMCO-MEISTER FIMCO-MEISTER is offline
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I agree on Jim's statements. I've also heard the in multiple plantings they should not exceed three and should be staggered far apart. I have a Jap Maple at my house and it is one of my favorite plants to see how landscapers incorporate. Some of it's best uses in my opinion is when it was not used near the front but rather in a lonely spot on a forgotten part of the yard. (I'm an irrigator) I have seen multiple plantings that actually worked though.
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  #14  
Old 12-16-2007, 03:03 PM
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bloodgood

i am not familar with a bloodgood jap maple, unless it is the same thing as a coral bark jap maple. is this the same tree?...clay
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Old 12-16-2007, 05:07 PM
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No. A 'bloodgood' japanese maple is not quite the same as a choral bark maple. They are similar, from the same genus and species, but different varieties. Acer palmatum 'bloodgood' and Acer palmatum 'sangu kaku'.

Here are some photos of a bloodgood maple;


.
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  #16  
Old 12-16-2007, 05:14 PM
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They are similar in size and growth habit. But they have a different leaf, different bark, and the Choral bark jap. maple tends to grow a lot higher density of branches inside it's canopy. So they need to be thinned out more often than the bloodgood's do, in order to stay looking nice. Their crowns can start to look a little too thick and bushy if you don't prune them for a few years. Also, newer Choral bark jap. maples tend to have weaker branches that droop a little bit near the ends. This doesn't happen as much with bloodgoods.

Here are a few photos of the choral bark jap. maple....


.
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  #17  
Old 12-16-2007, 05:48 PM
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jap maple

thanks for the info. and pictures jim. i still favor the choral bark. i guess i just like the red bark......clay when is the best time to thin out the canopy?
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  #18  
Old 12-16-2007, 06:14 PM
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I like them both. They both have their advantages and disadvantages. The Bloodgoods look amazing all spring and summer and fall. Not too many trees available that offer the unique foliage and color that they do. Even plum trees, which have a similar colored leaf, aren't nearly as beautiful as a bloodgood japanese maple.

But the choral bark jap. maples are the highlight of any landscape throughout the winter, when everything else is colorless and boring.

I think they're both very useful. We have installed several landscapes where our designer specified one of each in the yard. They compliment each other and aren't mutually exclusive, just as long as you don't put them to close to each other.

When do you prune them? I'll tell you if you will take down that hideous picture of that ugly man in your avatar and promise to never make me look at him again.
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  #19  
Old 12-16-2007, 08:37 PM
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I like them both. They both have their advantages and disadvantages. The Bloodgoods look amazing all spring and summer and fall. Not too many trees available that offer the unique foliage and color that they do. Even plum trees, which have a similar colored leaf, aren't nearly as beautiful as a bloodgood japanese maple.

But the choral bark jap. maples are the highlight of any landscape throughout the winter, when everything else is colorless and boring.

I think they're both very useful. We have installed several landscapes where our designer specified one of each in the yard. They compliment each other and aren't mutually exclusive, just as long as you don't put them to close to each other.

When do you prune them? I'll tell you if you will take down that hideous picture of that ugly man in your avatar and promise to never make me look at him again.
ok, how about this one.
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  #20  
Old 12-17-2007, 01:43 AM
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That's much better. That guy is originally from Salem, Oregon - where I grew up. I like him.

As far as I know, the best time to prune japanese maples is in the fall, just as they are losing or have just lost their leaves. And before it gets too cold. There is some sort of disease they can get if you prune them too late, if I recall.

That being said, the best time to prune is often when the tree needs it. I prune mine in the fall and again in early summer sometimes. It doesn't seem to bother it at all.
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