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  #1  
Old 01-26-2008, 05:56 PM
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sedge sedge is offline
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Oklahoma too windy for ride on's (PG, Z-spray, HPS, etc) on average?

Wind is always blowing here! I think it is like a 10 mph average breeze or something like that. Maybe even 15 mph, but with days well over 20 mph all day. So there are very few days of no wind, some, but very few. I don't see very many ride on around here. We are considering getting a ride on, but am worried we would have to much drift with the liquid apps.

Also, with the clay and rain, there is some time lag after a rain when you can use it. Just worried about spending that much money and then not being able to use it enough or use it and cause some problems.

I was planning on putting a hose reel on and hand spraying edges around flower beds and shrubs, but that will eat up some time also. or do you think if I hand spray out 6' to 8' ft out from the flower beds, that even if it is windy, I will not have to worry to much about drift?

Thanx again guys
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Old 01-26-2008, 06:05 PM
topsites topsites is offline
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I won't argue that you don't want to spray around a 15-20mph wind.

But there's always drift, there's absolutely no such thing as a perfectly still day, as you said, maybe a few and far in between, but there's almost always some type of a little breeze, and so there is always the drift.

You just have to learn to work with the drift, see how the wind affects the spray, then compensate with your tracking so you might end up spraying from a foot or so over from where you intend it to land, for example. A few feet over maybe, the worst is when the wind shifts, you have to pay attention, but it's not that bad either.

The closer the boom is to the ground might help, but there are times I find the drift actually helps, so to speak.
No, not quite, but once you get to working with the drift it hardly seems to get in the way anymore.

A little studying the forecast and learning to tell the weather yourself helps, so if you step outside in the morning and your hat gets blown off it's obviously not a good day for spraying. Alternate plans and be ready to spray most anytime but have other stuff to do in between... Keep yourself busy with whatever work and when a calmish day arrives you go spraying instead, it is a bit hit and miss but once you get a plan going it's not so bad.

I say so long it's below 10mph it should be doable, it helps to practice on a milder 4-5-8mph day but soon it becomes 2nd nature.

Last edited by topsites; 01-26-2008 at 06:15 PM.
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Old 01-26-2008, 07:11 PM
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sedge sedge is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by topsites View Post
I won't argue that you don't want to spray around a 15-20mph wind.

I poseted the wind chart below. I think it is an average of 12.2 for the year, but the highest is ofcourse in the spring when we would be doing broadcast sprays :-(

But there's always drift, there's absolutely no such thing as a perfectly still day, as you said, maybe a few and far in between, but there's almost always some type of a little breeze, and so there is always the drift.

You just have to learn to work with the drift, see how the wind affects the spray, then compensate with your tracking so you might end up spraying from a foot or so over from where you intend it to land, for example. A few feet over maybe, the worst is when the wind shifts, you have to pay attention, but it's not that bad either.

The closer the boom is to the ground might help, but there are times I find the drift actually helps, so to speak.
No, not quite, but once you get to working with the drift it hardly seems to get in the way anymore.

I take it your using a boom sprayer and not the boomlesslike the PG and the HPS?

A little studying the forecast and learning to tell the weather yourself helps, so if you step outside in the morning and your hat gets blown off it's obviously not a good day for spraying. Alternate plans and be ready to spray most anytime but have other stuff to do in between... Keep yourself busy with whatever work and when a calmish day arrives you go spraying instead, it is a bit hit and miss but once you get a plan going it's not so bad.

Yes I agree, but what I am wondring is if your better off in the end staying with a hose for this area, since there will be a higher % of days you can't apply and your looking for other things to do?

I say so long it's below 10mph it should be doable, it helps to practice on a milder 4-5-8mph day but soon it becomes 2nd nature.
Here is the actual wind chart for Oklahoma City area.

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 54 years average by month, Jan-12.5, Feb-13.1, March-14.3, April-14.2, May-12.5, June-11.8, July-10.9, Aug-10.4, Sept-10.8, Oct-11.8, Nov-12.3, Dec-12.3, Average for the year-12.2
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Old 01-26-2008, 07:26 PM
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Rayholio Rayholio is offline
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www.prolawnsprayshields.com

This is what I baught after one year in business, because we've got similar wind problems.

I still use it a lot... only drawback is that it + the grasshopper make for an awfully large machine
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Old 01-26-2008, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Rayholio View Post
www.prolawnsprayshields.com

This is what I baught after one year in business, because we've got similar wind problems.

I still use it a lot... only drawback is that it + the grasshopper make for an awfully large machine
Yes, we looked at them before. the problem is we have so damn many 32"-36" gates!!!
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Old 01-26-2008, 07:57 PM
yardprospraying yardprospraying is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayholio View Post
www.prolawnsprayshields.com

This is what I baught after one year in business, because we've got similar wind problems.

I still use it a lot... only drawback is that it + the grasshopper make for an awfully large machine
We use this same machine on a grasshopper. It is the only way to go on large properties 1+ acres. We too looked at the pg and z-spray, but don't think we would be able to use them very often. We like the prolawns so much that we are considering buying another. We handgun most of our small lawns even on windy days!! I know we push the limits on the wind issue, but sometimes there is no other choice in the spring.

As far as an hps, we have no problems fertilizing, even when it is a little windy, you just have to compensate for it by adjusting your spread patter and speed.

John.
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Old 01-26-2008, 08:31 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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Wind Permagreen

Remember that the Permagreen sprays low to the ground--less than 12 inches high. Perhaps talk to others in your area or get a demo (with water) from your dealer. Drift is usually minimal, in my mind. And near flowers you have the option to use the "Trim" nozzle which covers only the width of the wheels. I think you should be able to cover within 24 inches of flowers. In addition to your hose, I suggest build a holster for a one gallon hand sprayer, and use it to cover those tight areas. Use amine not ester. Maybe experiment with a drift ******ant chemical if you need it, for windy days.
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Old 01-27-2008, 11:00 AM
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Rayholio Rayholio is offline
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I spoke to my enforcement agent, and I asked her if I could make a case for spraying on windy days, as the 'application area' is always 0 mph wind with a shrouded sprayer.. she didn't give any definitive answer, but she acted like that made sense to her.. goog enough for me

for back gates, I'm actually considering getting the push sprayer, that you hook up to the tank / hose in the back of your truck..


MOST of the time, the spray wand on the grasshopper sprayer will get my back lawns.. you can get 20 ft or so away from the machine with it.. and you CAN get through 48 inch gates.. I only have 2 lawns it won't fit in
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  #9  
Old 01-27-2008, 01:19 PM
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sedge sedge is offline
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QUOTE=Rayholio;2118682]I spoke to my enforcement agent, and I asked her if I could make a case for spraying on windy days, as the 'application area' is always 0 mph wind with a shrouded sprayer.. she didn't give any definitive answer, but she acted like that made sense to her.. goog enough for me

for back gates, I'm actually considering getting the push sprayer, that you hook up to the tank / hose in the back of your truck..


MOST of the time, the spray wand on the grasshopper sprayer will get my back lawns.. you can get 20 ft or so away from the machine with it.. and you CAN get through 48 inch gates.. I only have 2 lawns it won't fit in [/QUOTE]

I was thinking of this also. Where can you get one?
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Old 01-27-2008, 01:55 PM
zimmatic zimmatic is offline
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I agree the prolawn sheilds work great and there probably isnt anyting that comes close to them for drift.
However, you can mitigate drift if you know your chemicals and how many gallons per acre they recomend in terms of spray volume I use alot of speed zone and it calls for 3-175 gallons an acre for spray volume in a 20 to 40 psi range. Knowing this you could move up to a large size nozzle that allows for more water to be release thus eliminating some/alot of drift. However the down side is not all target weeds/plants like being drenched with lots of carrier/water. Also by doing this you get less coverage on a tank of spray since your are spraying at higher volumes. Its a trade off worth considering when speding $$$$ of dollars
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