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  #1  
Old 02-04-2008, 04:03 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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How much water

We all talk about over-watering but never really discuss how often grass should be watered in order to keep clients happy and the grass healthy.

I realize that soils and temperatures along with the type of grass are all going to be variations in the timing and amounts. What I was curious about is whether there is a general rule of thumb that says how dry the soil should get before we turn the sprinkler on.

I am specifically interested deep rooting the sod that was placed last year. It is in a good clay loam topsoil about 3 inches thick. Sod here is KBG.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 02-04-2008, 09:33 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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This is known as the permanently wilting point (PWP), where the plant can no longer extract water even when it is available.

The PWP is a function of the soils and plant(s). Some plants are better adapted to pull water from the soil, others not so much.

If your shooting blind without a moisture meter, use the observation method. During the hottest part of the season do the following.

1) Determine the actual or desired effective rooting depth of the plants being irrigated.

2) Irrigated to that depth (or a little deeper if you have a leaching requirement), verify with a core sample (or moisture meter if you have one)

3) Don't irrigate again until the plants start showing signs of water deficit. At that point, you know you should be watering 1-2 days before that.

Note -> midday wilt != water deficit

There are other ways to determine the water requirements, but it involves calculations. The above is the easiest way for a homeowner and the occasional practitioner. If you want more info, we have discussed this topic extensively in the irrigation forum.
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  #3  
Old 02-05-2008, 06:25 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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That is kind of what I was thinking. Using the core sampler to check the depth of saturation and giving a period of drying out just a day or 2 shy of midday wilt. Thanks - I thought I was losing my mind.

My clients are hearing other voices and I am out numbered by those influenced in the daily watering crowd.

Irrigation Forum... I didn't think about that.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #4  
Old 02-05-2008, 10:13 AM
Tim Wilson Tim Wilson is offline
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Off topic a little

Kiril,

Do you know of any literature which discusses the potential microbial content of, or association with, hygroscopic water?

Tim
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  #5  
Old 02-05-2008, 10:56 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Wilson View Post
Do you know of any literature which discusses the potential microbial content of, or association with, hygroscopic water?
I have read some literature pertaining to this. Are you interested in how it relates to water management, bioremediation, nutrient cycling, microbial populations, or all of the above?

Here's a couple that you might be interested in. I'll look through my poorly managed archive and see if I can find some other studies.

Relationship Between The Chemical Structure Of Humic Substances And Their Hygroscopic Properties

Physiology and Microbial Community Structure in Soil at Extreme Water Content

Review of Microbial Responses to Abiotic Environmental Factors in the Context of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

Modeling Phosphorus Transport In Soil And Water

Soil Physics and Rural Water Management – Progress, Needs and Challenges

Salt Mineralogy of Las Vegas Wash, Nevada: Morphology and Subsurface Evaporation

Water Potential and Aggregate Size Effects on Contact Angle and Surface Energy

Biological Soil Crusts: Ecology and Management

Water Controls on Soil Processes in the Southwest

Last edited by Kiril; 02-05-2008 at 11:05 AM. Reason: Added another link with pretty graphs :)
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  #6  
Old 02-05-2008, 10:59 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
That is kind of what I was thinking. Using the core sampler to check the depth of saturation and giving a period of drying out just a day or 2 shy of midday wilt. Thanks - I thought I was losing my mind.
Don't use midday wilt as your indicator. Midday wilt can occur even when there is sufficient soil water available.
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  #7  
Old 02-05-2008, 11:22 AM
Tim Wilson Tim Wilson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
I have read some literature pertaining to this. Are you interested in how it relates to water management, bioremediation, nutrient cycling, microbial populations, or all of the above?

Here's a couple that you might be interested in. I'll look through my poorly managed archive and see if I can find some other studies.

Relationship Between The Chemical Structure Of Humic Substances And Their Hygroscopic Properties

Physiology and Microbial Community Structure in Soil at Extreme Water Content

Review of Microbial Responses to Abiotic Environmental Factors in the Context of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

Modeling Phosphorus Transport In Soil And Water

Soil Physics and Rural Water Management – Progress, Needs and Challenges

Salt Mineralogy of Las Vegas Wash, Nevada: Morphology and Subsurface Evaporation

Water Potential and Aggregate Size Effects on Contact Angle and Surface Energy

Biological Soil Crusts: Ecology and Management

Water Controls on Soil Processes in the Southwest
Thanks Kiril,

I'm mostly interested in long term active survival of microbes (protists mostly) in semi-drought and drought conditions.

Tim
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  #8  
Old 02-05-2008, 11:24 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Wilson View Post
Thanks Kiril,

I'm mostly interested in long term active survival of microbes (protists mostly) in semi-drought and drought conditions.

Tim
OK, I'll see what I can chase down.
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  #10  
Old 02-06-2008, 03:01 PM
Tim Wilson Tim Wilson is offline
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Thanks Kiril, I really appreciate your efforts. I shall read through these and see what I find.

Tim
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