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Old 02-17-2008, 11:11 AM
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PlatinumLandCon PlatinumLandCon is offline
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Landscaping College programs

Hi Everyone,
I'm 17 and I'm starting to seriously think about college and what I want to take. I've always said I'll drop landscaping after I finish college, but I'm now starting to reconsider. I think taking a landscape program and continuing it as a career might be worth it.

I have no idea where to start looking for programs though. A college here in Toronto has a program (http://postsecondary.humber.ca/01521.htm) but I have no idea about it. I haven't traveled much so I wouldn't mind coming down to the states for a good program, especially if its only 2 years (obvious reduced costs vs. 4 year program).

How many of you have gone to college for landscaping? What program did you take? What did you think of it? I hope to see some detailed replies, as they would be VERY beneficial for me.

Thanks
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Old 02-17-2008, 11:51 AM
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NewHorizon's Land NewHorizon's Land is offline
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I was in the "two year" program at Delaware Tech and Community College(www.dtcc.edu). I liked it, the teachers were nice and laid back to a degree. The bad part was the college didnt give the program "loads of money" so we were not able to do many projects. Also it was very hard for me to run my business and also go to college full time. I drove back and forth (45 mins one way). The semesters there are 17 credits. You really need to be able to pay for college with out a full time job so you can focus on the school work.

Also I have heard good things about Virigina Tech's Landscaping/Turf program and I believe Delaware Valley College has one as well (delval.edu)
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Old 02-17-2008, 06:08 PM
PSUturf PSUturf is offline
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I went to Finger Lakes Community College, about 45 minutes south of Rochester, NY, not too far from Toronto. The two professors I had for the Hort classes retired recently and were replaced but I don't know anything about the new ones. It was a pretty good program. There wasn't't much hands on training. It focused more on how things worked (nutrient cycling, insect and disease life cycles, plant growth) and how to identify and solve problems in the landscape.

My condolences on the Maple Leafs season.
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Old 02-17-2008, 08:41 PM
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fshrdan fshrdan is offline
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Michigan State University has one of the best hort programs in the country. Also UGA- Univ of Georgia has a great program. I went to college at Montana State and we used text books written by Michael Dirr from UGA. Dirr is retired as a professor now, but UGA's programs are first rate.
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Old 02-17-2008, 09:11 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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I atended the local state university, which is considered one of the best Natural Resourse Colleges in the country. I was required to complete certain Botany courses before I was able to do the Horticulture course. Glad they set it up that way because a solid foundation of everything we know about plant life makes the horticultural practices rational. Here we had weekly field trips along with everything else and were required to write essays on what these different businesses did and why they did it that way. Good program. It was the first and last time I was exposed to a plantation of ginseng.

Landscape design is a lot of personal preference but being able to help the client with fundamental ideas is helpful. Good luck to you.
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Old 02-17-2008, 09:12 PM
Tom B. Tom B. is offline
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Kansas State University.
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Old 02-17-2008, 09:39 PM
TurfBoy08 TurfBoy08 is offline
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Virginia Tech
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Old 02-18-2008, 12:52 AM
kruege84 kruege84 is offline
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I'm in the hort program at Michigan State University. There are 2 different concentrations: general horticulture and landscape design, construction, and management. It really is a great show they run over here and comes highly recommended. Unfortunately, it's a 4 year degree. But should you choose MSU, you certainly won't regret it. The classes are a lot of hands-on learning and cover every area of the industry. Well worth the 4 years in my opinion.

Last I heard, the 3 best hort programs in the US are at MSU, Penn State, and Columbia.
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Old 02-18-2008, 09:10 AM
AGLA AGLA is offline
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What you want to be able to do should define what you need for an education. Figure that out and then ask what program matches that skill set. Other than that, all you will get is guys telling you that where they went is the best or their local school is.
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Old 02-18-2008, 09:49 AM
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EagleLandscape EagleLandscape is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kruege84 View Post
I'm in the hort program at Michigan State University. There are 2 different concentrations: general horticulture and landscape design, construction, and management. It really is a great show they run over here and comes highly recommended. Unfortunately, it's a 4 year degree. But should you choose MSU, you certainly won't regret it. The classes are a lot of hands-on learning and cover every area of the industry. Well worth the 4 years in my opinion.

Last I heard, the 3 best hort programs in the US are at MSU, Penn State, and Columbia.
HAHAHAHA, the best HORT program in the US is Texas A&M University. hands down, best program in the world!
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