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  #11  
Old 03-18-2008, 09:12 AM
STRINGALATION's Avatar
STRINGALATION STRINGALATION is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: LOUISVILLE, KY.
Posts: 777
i haVE DECIDED to use the verticals post like it was originaly done and use re-bar in the base course. i feel if it lasted 20 years the way it was re-bar ,gravel, geogrid, grain tile and tcompacting it should last forever ooh yeah he called back after telling me 3.7k was to much could i do for 3k i said there is no wiggle room except to shorten the walll. he says thanks but no thanks ..call back a week later and wants it done so i 'm probably 1-2k under priced. will see how it goes and if i missed a lot of things but i do not think so
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  #12  
Old 03-18-2008, 11:41 PM
Mark Bogart Mark Bogart is offline
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Location: Monte Vista, Colorado
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If you use vertical posts double up on them. You will end up with more vertical surface area.
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  #13  
Old 03-19-2008, 10:58 AM
GravelyNut GravelyNut is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Wet part of FL
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If you are afraid of the verticals tilting over from the wall load, you could buy switch ties instead of regular ones. They come in many lenghts up to about 21 feet. But be forewarned, they are very heavy at that lenght. Also, be aware that there are different grades of ties. Relay ties are the better quality ones. Landscape ties are normally the lowest quality as they can not be used again by a railroad. If you find a date nail in them, look for ones from the 50's that are still in good shape. Newer ties from the 80's and 90's are not treated as well and rot faster. Ask CSX about that.
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  #14  
Old 03-19-2008, 01:35 PM
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STRINGALATION STRINGALATION is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: LOUISVILLE, KY.
Posts: 777
my thhoughts are
1. the wall pictured is 20 years old and not completly garbage
2. 3' wall with 5' post [2' in the ground]
3. will double the post for effect.
4. notice the wall at it's lowest is 5 courses and it's highest is 1 course

questions
1. i have heard railroad ties are tough to cut . any recomendations?
2. at 104' is it best to shoot the level rather than playing with the 4 3' levels i have?

thanks for all the help
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  #15  
Old 03-19-2008, 09:30 PM
GravelyNut GravelyNut is offline
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Location: Wet part of FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STRINGALATION View Post
my thhoughts are
1. the wall pictured is 20 years old and not completly garbage
2. 3' wall with 5' post [2' in the ground]
3. will double the post for effect.
4. notice the wall at it's lowest is 5 courses and it's highest is 1 course

questions
1. i have heard railroad ties are tough to cut . any recomendations?
2. at 104' is it best to shoot the level rather than playing with the 4 3' levels i have?

thanks for all the help
Good ties are made of oak. The problem isn't the wood if new but the creosote that is used to preserve them. It gums up the chains and bars on a chainsaw. And the blades on most other saws. Older ties aren't too bad if the chainsaw oiler is working right.
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