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  #1  
Old 12-12-2001, 09:31 PM
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fshrdan fshrdan is offline
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Mole-Med

I have a customer with a mole problem that's just about to reach epidemic proportions. Have any of you had experience with Mole-Med? Is it effective? If you offer this service, what is your square footage costs? Also, where do I get an MSDS for this product?

Yes, I have conducted a search. I prefer not to trap... I'm not on this property enough. And no, the Mole Med website does not have a MSDS to download.

Thanks in advance, Daniel
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  #2  
Old 12-12-2001, 09:54 PM
James234 James234 is offline
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Sometimes Poison is Best

If they don't have dogs or cats, try Sweeney's Poison Peanuts. Should be available at your local Lowe's, etc. Follow the directions closely. Zinc Phosphide works great on these guys. However, in the longer term consider the insects in the ground as the real problem and use insecticides as required. Don't fall for the old "Juicy Fruit gum and human hair" routine.
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Old 12-12-2001, 10:03 PM
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Only one thing works on moles that is guaranteed to work. NOTHING you buy in stores is effective enough for a multiple problem.
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  #4  
Old 12-12-2001, 10:06 PM
MATTHEW MATTHEW is offline
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The thing about these mole trails is that what you are seeing is the tip of the iceberg. The network runs deep and far. You can trap and poison moles, but the connecting paths are still intact and other moles will eventually follow them and resurface. You need to have a long term plan including poison, traps, and repellants. And for goodness sakes, don't guarantee ANYTHING.
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Old 12-12-2001, 10:14 PM
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fshrdan fshrdan is offline
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Sweeney's poison peanuts... hmm... sounds yummy. Do moles prefer these in lightly salted or honey roasted flavors??? I'll have to pass unfortunately. Cute little black lab pup in yard now. I'll check them out for later though.

Runner, yeah I know what you're saying, but I can't do it, and I know the squimish old lady of the house won't do it. Maybe I'll tell her to hire an exterminating co.
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Old 12-12-2001, 11:01 PM
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That's what I was getting at. Only exterminating companies (and VERY few lawn companies) can do this. Because of the licensing, and liability involved, it is very expensive. It takes a fumigant certification. The stuff thst is used, is a RUP. That is a restricted use pestide. VERY controlled. and VERY regulated. It takes a special permit to purchase this product. It takes a special permit to transport this product, It takes a spaecial permit to STORE this product, and of course one to USE it. You are inspected once a month by the state, and they check your facility. They check your inventory, and paper on it and it BETTER be all accounted for! It must be kept not only in IT'S container, but be also kept in a secondary container, and that is to be kept in what is called a dry cabinet. What a dry cabinet is, is a special cabinet that is used like in laboratories and chemical labs. The use of this service is a bit pricey, (usually around $125 to $200 bucks for the visit, but is guaranteed effective. They have a seasonal contract for around 2 something. A small bottle of this sells for around $200. If you have a puppy around, your best bet would be to just get you insectide down, and spray your entire prop. with a castoroil mix. It's temporary, but it works. Incidentally, for your customers knowledge, the castoroil is completely non-toxic and harmless. Even to pets.
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  #7  
Old 12-12-2001, 11:12 PM
LAWNGODFATHER LAWNGODFATHER is offline
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Cheap bubble gum, put it in the tunnles and they will eat it, but they can't digest it.

Or flood them out with water
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  #8  
Old 12-12-2001, 11:30 PM
Mr.Ziffel Mr.Ziffel is offline
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You guys are funny There is more folklore, stories, myths and just plain fantasy and fiction about moles than you can shake a stick at...and most of it has been repeated in this thread. I was able to find the following link that I had bookmarked:

http://www.agcom.purdue.edu/AgCom/Pu...ks/ADM-10.html

It links with Purdue University ag department and has mostly facts which I hope will help. There is also a fellow called the Moleman who has a web site which I can't find right now and he has good info.

Trapping is the only thing which is proven to work and it has a side benefit...a body to show for your efforts, if you're successful. I forgot to say that a good cat can work wonders, but as we have fifteen [at last count] of them running around between three different barns on my property and still have moles all around [but very, very few mice and no rats] I'd say that these cats aren't professional mole chasers and I'm going to have to sic my wife on those pesky moles again. She's very proud of her mole trapping record.

Good luck with whatever you try, just don't try what my step-dad's neighbor did when he stuck his cutting torch nozzle down the mole hole for five minutes and then struck his sparker

Will M.
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  #9  
Old 12-12-2001, 11:46 PM
scottt scottt is offline
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The poison peanuts will not work on moles. Moles are insectivores, so they won't eat nuts, tubers, bulbs etc. Are you sure it is moles? It could be gophers or voles. Probably not voles though because of the time of year. They will be going deeper now. If you aren't sure exactly what it is, traps are the best thing to use. Read the directions carefully and make sure you secure it with a stake If you don't and you get one, it will run down its tunnel with the trap attached.
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  #10  
Old 12-13-2001, 02:12 AM
2 man crew 2 man crew is offline
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Mr. Ziffil !
lmao
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