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  #11  
Old 11-06-2008, 12:02 AM
creativeaudio69 creativeaudio69 is offline
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The sheep's foot compactor is only going to come in handy if you have a lot of clay in your soil.
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  #12  
Old 11-06-2008, 12:04 AM
creativeaudio69 creativeaudio69 is offline
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You can use a cheaper compactor, but you'll have to get down to virgin soil, compat that sub-grade and put in your base in two inch lifts. Anything larger than two inch lifts will not compact with a small compactor.
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  #13  
Old 11-25-2008, 07:55 PM
Branching Out Branching Out is offline
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I thought thagt was the driveway from the gag e-mail tha i have seen sent around
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  #14  
Old 12-03-2008, 05:15 PM
PatriotLandscape PatriotLandscape is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creativeaudio69 View Post
You can use a cheaper compactor, but you'll have to get down to virgin soil, compat that sub-grade and put in your base in two inch lifts. Anything larger than two inch lifts will not compact with a small compactor.
you need a compactor with at least 6k of force nothing smaller. why risk it just rent the right machine.
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  #15  
Old 12-10-2008, 01:17 PM
rproducts rproducts is offline
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Without a doubt, at least 12" of a modified stone base compacted in 2'' lifts, make sure you use a geotextile fabric such as Mirafi 3XT this will stop your base from working its way into the soil this is even more important if you are working with a clay base. I would also a Permeable Paver, this would allow for water to drain naturally back into the earth this would eliminate the potential waterfall, also Canadian paver manufactures put their paver thru 50 freeze thaw cycles in salt water during testing as opposed to what we do here in the U.S. only 20 freeze thaw cycles, in other words you can pour rocksalt on Canadian pavers without hurting them.
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  #16  
Old 12-11-2008, 10:30 AM
CertPro CertPro is offline
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I virgin soil is 4' down, then you need to dig 4' down! No exceptions. On a new construction home, the soil WILL settle no matter how thick your base is. You need to be on virgin, suitable soil. On option though is to bore down through the frost line, install concrete piers, pour a concrete slab and overlay your pavers on that. This way you will have support without the additional excavation a standard paver installation requires.
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  #17  
Old 12-24-2008, 03:22 PM
SuperDuty335 SuperDuty335 is offline
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I agree with the previous post. Excavate to the virgin soil then compact the soil as you fill it back up to grade.
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