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  #11  
Old 01-02-2009, 01:17 AM
ein999 ein999 is offline
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Location: michigan
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Yeah make sure the bearing that turns the piston is not siezed or you need not only a piston and head but you will need the crank also. Then in my opinion you might be in the 200 range. It is still worth it considering you will have a brand new engine but if the carb is gone and have to rebuild carb add another 25 for carb rebuild kit. then your pushing it because you could have a brand new one for a few hundered more. Look at it this way youll gain experience with rebuilding something that is easy to rebuild. and youll have a brand new engine in your blower and save a feww hundered for a days labor.
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  #12  
Old 01-02-2009, 01:23 AM
ein999 ein999 is offline
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Wait i didnt mean the lower bearings i meant the bearing or connection in the crankshaft. Which if rusted or sometimes they rust or seize i dont know why it can mean a whole new crank. SO my point is the lowers are impotant also because they cost like 150-200 new. Or at least my shindaiwa one did. Thats when i got into the business.
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  #13  
Old 01-02-2009, 01:44 AM
battler battler is offline
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Gees thanks mate, I'm in a regional area in Townsville, Qld, Australia, and I've no complaints, except that like any regional towns, it's dificult to get some things done as is might be common world wide, but there are businesses who are genuine. I thank you for your advice. I'll take notice of your advice re drive shaft greasing. Thanks again.
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2009, 06:40 AM
salvagedrover salvagedrover is offline
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9 out of 10 times, the carburetor is the culprit. if the machine is old however, maybe its just tired. its like rebuilding a trans on an old truck, or replacing the motor. the rest if the truck/trimmer is still going to be old. I'd buy a cylinder base gasket first. pull the carb, and muffler and inspect both ends for scoring. when you get the gasket, ask for the max. clearance on the piston ring gap. actually, forget that. go buy a new wrist pin, rings and carb. to rebuild a carb is dumb, because the butterfly shaft wears out in the body and no kit in the world will replace worn metal. also, passages get enlarged, like a trickle of water + time = grand canyon. get my point? the rings are designed to wear. replace them. the carb just DOES wear. replace it. shouldn't be more than 40-60 bucks. if so, they're overcharging you, and you need to go elsewhere and not settle there. new cylinder gasket, heck, gasket kit for the whole machine, carb, and rings = as close to a new machine as possible that may last another 10+ years. I went to schools for this, I'm not making this stuff up. you should listen to me. actually, I'd just get a new carb, rings, and cylinder base gasket, and sell it in favor of a new one that's been improved w/ new technical advances. they run better, are lighter w/ more power, and last longer, not to mention being cheaper and easier to fix. just my 0.02

-dave
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  #15  
Old 01-02-2009, 06:45 AM
salvagedrover salvagedrover is offline
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what are you mumbling about? don't listen to him, he doesn't know anything.
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  #16  
Old 11-03-2011, 07:57 PM
kingriver kingriver is offline
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Help please

Quote:
Originally Posted by salvagedrover View Post
good news bud, you have asked the right person, the right question. I have bought/ aquired over 30 of these, and rebuilt about 20. You will need to get the cylinder off first. Remove the air filter assy. With a phillips, slide out the square nuts from the top of the housing, and thread them back onto the bolts which should keep those all together in their holes in the a/f assy. Next, remove the s. Plug and spray a liberal amount of wd-40 or pb blaster or something similar down the plug hole. Next, remove the engine cover, and replace the phillips screws back in their holes in the housing. Remove the carb assy from the black insulator block attached to the cylinder, but don't remove that block. Its fine, just leave it. Next, remove the plate at the top of the cylinder; loosen the screws with a wrench first to make sure they don't strip. Then, with a 4mm allen, remove the lower bolt to the muffler, and then the two 5mm allen bolts from the top. They all may need some persuasion, so a small punch, or nail set will work to jar them loose. Don't forget the wd or blaster. Then remove the 4 4mm bolts securing the cylinder. Spray them first w/ the wd or blaster, and then slide a 6" 3/8 extension into the holes. Hit that with a ballpeen hammer about 2-3 good whacks ea. The bolts should come out w/ ease. Now, seeing as the piston and rings are already garbage, stick a metal rod into the s. Plug hole, and whack the top of the piston. Keep the device off of the cylinder walls for obvious reasons. Spray some more ky into the cylinder to lube everything a bit before you start whacking away. A good idea would be to wear a glove and hold the cylinder up, while hitting the device down on the piston. It will come apart easier, and cleaner this way with minimal damage. Like peeling off a bandaid vs. Ripping it off. Now that the cylinder is off, inspect it for deep gouges, and lines. There really shouldn't be any, but if there are, try and get rid of them w/ emery cloth. Try to blend in the repair by feathering past the damage a bit. If it's too extensive, just chuck it and get a new one. Do not remove more mate ial than is necessary. If need be, bring this to an ope shop to quickly be honed. Now, you will need a new piston, two rings, a wrist pin, wrist pin bearing, two piston pin circlips, no keepers, as the orig. Ones should be ok. Also a new carb to insulator block gasket as well as a muffler gasket, and obviously a new base gasket. Now, there is a muffler recall. The old muffler will have the lower mount stamped on the inside of the muffler closest to the block, while the new design will be welded on from below. If this is an old muffler, bring it back to a redmax auth. Dealer. T e replacement is completely free. If they say otherwise, let me know, and i'll give you a number to call the n.e. Div. Dist. For redmax and you can report the shop. You pay nothing, not even shipping. You will get a new muffler, two new mounting bolts, (no lower bolt, so don't strip it,) and a gasket. This is also a good time to replace the pullcord, s. Plug, a/filter, fuel filter, fuel lines, and air filter pre cleaner. Essentially your motor will be pretty much new, save for the lower end. Which reminds me, pull the recoil w/ an 8mm socket. Grab the round thing and look into the motor as you pull it back and forth looking for overly excessive play. Now, look down at the crank. Pull the rod straight up, so the flat areas of the counter weights are facing you. Put your thumb and forefinger on each flat spot of each counterweight, and try to move the weights in different directions w/ your hands and fingers. Needless to say, there should obviously be no opposing movement. Lastly, spin the bottom end slowly, to look for and binding, flat spotting of bearings, or stiction in them. If there is any, they might need to be replaced. If so, i will walk you through that too if need be. Anyways assuming all is well in your motor's world, install the new bearing- btw., dip all internal parts in 2-cycle mix prior to assy., or spray with mix in a spray bottle. Put enough into the lower end, to reach 1/2 way up the bearings. So, as i was saying, the arrow on the piston points to the muffler, denoting the flow of fuel. With the arrow pointing to your right, install the new circlip to the rear. Now, install the bearing and carefully the spacers. Slide the piston over this sandwich, and run the new piston pin, which should slide right in, through to the circlip on the other side. Now, install the front clip. A pick is useful for removing them at the two indentations, and needlenose to push the pin all the way in, as well as installation of the clips. Now, install the base gasket, providing you removed all previous gasket material from both the block as well as the cylinder. Hold the rings as compressed as possible, with your left thumb and index, while carefully sliding the cylinder down with the right. Once the rings go into the taper and both disappear into the cylinder, tighten the four bolts, install the muffler, top two bolts first, then tighten the lower bolt. Install the plate on the top of the cylinder, and the recoil if you didn't already. Install the carb, throttle cable first. Then, re-attach the air cleaner assy. And fill up the tank. Full choke till it starts to start, then, 1/4 to 1/3 throttle and take off the choke. Goose the throttle to full maybe 3-4 times, then let it idle at 1/4 for 30 secs. Or so. Now, gradually bring it down to idle. You may or may not need to change the idle screw. Idle is 21-2200 rpm if memory serves correct. The top end should be 7100-7200rpm. Otherwise, the carb needs attention. Now, leave it idling for say 5-10 minutes. Next, recheck the idle rpms. Gradually over the course of a minute, bring it to full throttle, leave it for 15-20 seconds, then another gradual minute bringing it back down. You basically want to use it for 30 -60 mins at 3/4 throttle, going through the rpm fange to seat the rings into the cylinder at different rpms. Any porsche mechanic will tell you this. Now my friend, you should be good. I recommend stihl hp or hp ultra oil. Its better than even echo, redmax, and stihl. I saw a comparative study w/ 8 oil brands and types of the same no load motor run for 500 hours. The stihl oil kicked the crap out of everyone else, hands down. My email is salvahedrover@yahoo, and i'm an ope tech that specializes in echo and redmax, specifically 7001 and 8000 backpacks. And further questions, please don't hesitate to shoot me an email. Hope this helped, -dave
what a score, this is great info, do you know if a person can order to completely rebuilt engine for the ebz7001rh?

Thanks for your valuable time
james
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  #17  
Old 11-03-2011, 09:06 PM
dboyd351 dboyd351 is offline
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Location: Cape Charles, VA
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Salvagedrover,
Thanks much for the detailed information!!!
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  #18  
Old 11-06-2013, 11:35 AM
russ and sons russ and sons is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: St.Louis Mo.
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rings

i am going to attempt to rebuild a eb7001 blower i have. bought a new piston , rings and head. my question is, do the rings go on in any certain order or placement on the piston ? thanks, Russ
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  #19  
Old 11-06-2013, 12:05 PM
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BigFish BigFish is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by russ and sons View Post
i am going to attempt to rebuild a eb7001 blower i have. bought a new piston , rings and head. my question is, do the rings go on in any certain order or placement on the piston ? thanks, Russ
Well, the piston has a steel pin in each ring groove to locate the ring end gap. It is offset in the groove so the rings can only fit one way. I usually mark the pin locations on top of the piston with a sharpie for reference. Be sure and lube up the cyl., pin/bearing and rings with straight 2 cycle oil. I also lube the crank brngs. I spray all the gaskets with sealer. Never seez on the muffler bolts and a dab on the plug thrds.
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