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  #21  
Old 01-22-2009, 12:24 PM
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treegal1 treegal1 is offline
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OMG NO, several men living in the woods with out a shower for 2 weeks at a time. they all bathe before the drive home, so the health department does not arrest them as a bio hazard.

then I have to find the wood land animal that they always try and sneak past me, baby this or orphaned that. the rattle snake was cool. to bad the left it in there luggage
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  #22  
Old 01-22-2009, 12:31 PM
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Barefoot James Barefoot James is offline
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Arn't those Eucalyptus trees? I understand about the stink factor but the trees smell pretty good! How many acres are they doing a year?
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  #23  
Old 01-22-2009, 01:13 PM
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DUSTYCEDAR DUSTYCEDAR is offline
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WOW thats a quick turnaround
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  #24  
Old 01-22-2009, 01:23 PM
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treegal1 treegal1 is offline
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we don't do any of the growing our self's, we buy a timber contract and then do the "WORK" most of the time its in 300 acre tracts, they grow it all over north Florida and some in Ga. we have only cut eucalyptus 3-4 time over the years. most of the time its pine, or pulp wood.
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  #25  
Old 01-22-2009, 05:35 PM
TF PLUS TF PLUS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treegal1 View Post
my interest in wood waste started with a machine like this.

I said " they are trowing away the good parts " and instantly looked at the how do I get some part of that bark and RWC.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EnamT...eature=related

unfortunatly here we get very little hard wood, its mostly pine. but every now and then we get some logs come up and we always save the "skins" and "greens" for our selfs
Amazing I saw an operation similar to that on tv Most dangerous jobs
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  #26  
Old 01-22-2009, 08:11 PM
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Barefoot James Barefoot James is offline
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So Kiril what say you about Ramial Chipped Wood. You say it has merit but need more studies? Anything else? The studies I have read say the most prolific top soils come from old growth oak forrests. Pine Valley, NJ has black waters due to the humic/fulvic acids and humates ooozing from the ground. They also have tons of oak. What say you on this, RCW subject?
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  #27  
Old 01-22-2009, 08:20 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barefoot James View Post
So Kiril what say you about Ramial Chipped Wood. You say it has merit but need more studies? Anything else?
No, I said it was interesting. Kinda is common sense (the whole green wood thing) if you think about it. I was just curious if anyone else has done studies on it for various other uses. One study is good, but until the findings can be corroborated, the results have to be taken with a grain of salt.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barefoot James View Post
The studies I have read say the most prolific top soils come from old growth oak forrests.
Yes, this is usually a given when you consider the stage of succession.



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  #28  
Old 01-23-2009, 12:51 PM
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muddstopper muddstopper is offline
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Been away for a day. Looks like the Ramil chip wood is spraking a little interest.

I have long used chiped wood as a mulch material around trees and shrubs. I get a couple of loads everytime they clear the power right of ways. Sometimes its small chips, somethimes big chips and sometimes firewood size. I just have never used it in a garden as a mulch material. Observations over the years has shown me that if the piles are left a lone where they are dumped, they still compost away in a year or two. The bark mulch will react much faster than the chips. This is what led me to try some bark mulch in the garden last year. By the end of the growing season, it was almost dirt so I know its breaking down. If it is breaking down it has to be releaseing nutrients to the growing plants. I have about one, maybe two loader buckets full left so this year I intend to just do a small section using onion and garlic bulbs just to satisfy my couriousity.

The question was asked what kind of soil I am working with, its subsoil that came out of the bottom of a 200ft cut for a highway project.
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  #29  
Old 01-23-2009, 01:07 PM
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White Gardens White Gardens is offline
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Originally Posted by muddstopper View Post
Been away for a day. Looks like the Ramil chip wood is spraking a little interest.

The question was asked what kind of soil I am working with, its subsoil that came out of the bottom of a 200ft cut for a highway project.
Yikes, that doesn't sound like very good soil. Is it rocky, silty, or other.
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  #30  
Old 01-23-2009, 09:46 PM
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Mostly a gray slate mixed with red slate that has been groundup under the dozer tracks. I dug some rocks out of the patch that where so big my loader couldnt pick them off the ground and I know I can lift a 3200lb pallet of lime.

I screend out all the rocks bigger than 2inches and incorporated several loads of horse bedding mixed with the manure to get a little OM going. I was able to get a decent stand of beans, squash, and okra last year. At the end of the season, I tilled in lime and fert and then overseeded with annual ryegrass. Soil seems to be breaking up some due to excessive plant/root density,( purposely planted that way), coupled with the freezeing and thawing of this winter. I just did a shovel test and roots are going about 6 inches deep. I will turn the ryegrass over before it stems and makes seeds. I will also be adding some good compost tilled in and then plant the veggies.

I have already been thru this before on another patch of ground. There I dug the soil out 2ft deep and crushed it under the loader tracks before mixing in very old composted cow manure and pushing it back into the hole it was dug from. It took about three years of liming and rototilling to break the rocks down into something that resembled dirt, but the soil went from red to almost black and grew veggies great with zero irrigation except for nature. On that plot I used buckwheat as a covercrop to help concentrate calcium levels and clover legumes to help build organic matter and put N into the soil. We dont use large amounts of synthetic ferts, but will add P and K as well as dolomite to build up the soil levels of these missing nutrients.
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