Register free!


Reply
 
Thread Tools   Display Modes
  #21  
Old 03-18-2009, 02:16 PM
Marcos Marcos is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Cincinnati OH
Posts: 3,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Necessity is the Mother of invention.

When we 'have to' adapt, to a world with no water, - we - then tend to use common sense. To survive.

When the sky's the Limit, to have the best lawn in the neighborhood, we believe anything that makes the grass green as - " The Secret" .
Common sense, not withstanding.

Which brings up an interestting point. :

Are we growing turf that could survive on the Natural Rainfall of a particluar region?
If we are not, then what are we doing?
Grasses were able to thrive without our help b4, now - What have we done to make it better??
There has been more & more interest in some circles in re-establishing stuff like Buffalograss in the Great Plains states, as a lawn turf.

This fact remains:
Some folks seem to be more than happy to put up with the courser texture of it in order to save irrigation $$.
Others will scream bloody murder the minute they realize what it is, and that it was intentionally planted in their yard.

It's not much different than the classic battle here in the upper transition zone between the respective bluegrass and TTT fescue camps.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-18-2009, 07:44 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,978
No water - no 4 fert apps in 5 months either. It will burn it up.

How much mowing can buffalo grass tolerate?
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-18-2009, 09:09 PM
Marcos Marcos is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Cincinnati OH
Posts: 3,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
No water - no 4 fert apps in 5 months either. It will burn it up.

How much mowing can buffalo grass tolerate?
That's the whole point, Smallaxe!
Less watering, mowing and fertilizer!

Here....read this.
(Skip down to "Adaptation & Use" if you're pressed for time.)

http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/turf/pu...s/buffalo.html


Buffalo grass, once established, is full of thin underground stolons that form a dense sod. Therefore, withstanding drought conditions isn't a problem. On the contrary, too much water may actually cause other grasses like bermudagrass to take over...

Somebody lately's been downloading some excellent stuff on the 'net from the late '20s and early '30s!
Our grandparents & great-grandparents knew all about this kind of stuff all along.
Now two generations later, we're discovering it all over again!
This is from October 1933 :

http://turf.lib.msu.edu/1930s/1933/3310144.pdf

(the last page...p. 149 is most informative in terms of turf maintenance)
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-18-2009, 10:15 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,978
A mowing machine
or a high-cut lawn mower, cutting at a height of 2 inches, will cut
the taller grasses without unduly injuring the prostrate buffalo grass.
Observations indicate that persistent and repeated close clippings of
buffalo grass with an ordinary lawn mower weakens the grass and
encourages the inroads of weeds.

So 2" isn't considered close for Buffalo Grass. I don't cut KBG that close if I can avoid it.

We are not rediscovering it as much as we are rereading the archives. Back in the 30s we were largely a rural country, with a sensible understanding of agronomics. Now most wisdom/knowledge/propaganda comes from the city.
For me personally, if the yard isn't comfortable for me to go barefoot in I change it to more user friendly. Stones are more practical in many ways but I will never use them.
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-18-2009, 11:16 PM
quiet quiet is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Texas
Posts: 720
Buffalo grass is a prairie grass. If you have a couple acres and wanna do just minimal work on a lawn: cutting it every couple of months, don't care if weeds invade, don't care if your turf has that blowin' in the breeze look, then buffalo is OK.

But if you like the "look" of a lawn, buffalo doesn't make it. Miserable excuse for a turfgrass.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-19-2009, 01:02 AM
Marcos Marcos is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Cincinnati OH
Posts: 3,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by quiet View Post
Buffalo grass is a prairie grass. If you have a couple acres and wanna do just minimal work on a lawn: cutting it every couple of months, don't care if weeds invade, don't care if your turf has that blowin' in the breeze look, then buffalo is OK.

But if you like the "look" of a lawn, buffalo doesn't make it. Miserable excuse for a turfgrass.
You're 100% correct in that everybody's got different their distinct preferences.

But as far as groundwater is concerned, folks living "high-on-the-hog" right now in the great plains states and the southwest U.S. are going to have some gut-wrenching decisions to make in the next couple of decades.....drought or no drought.

Residential lifestyle practices will need to be completely re-thought, inside AND outside the home, including the specific vegetation and/or rock-type matter that would entail a new 21st century definition of a ..........."perfect lawn".
Industry & business will need to be re-tooled to reduce water waste.
Agriculture..........well, agriculture should've never been started in most of those areas in the 1st place!
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 03-19-2009, 07:36 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,978
I remember a PBS special entitled "The Desert Doesn't Bloom Here Anymore". The deal was - they had found water under ground so they started irrigating the desert and started growing some great crops.

Eventually they discovered that all the water pouring through the sand brought up the salt levels in the soil to the point of nothing would grow again.

Would have a little effort to build up the soils and better planning of the crops and therefore using less water have made that experiment a lot more feasible? To me that would have been so much fun to work with, but the reality was just to over kill on everything and exploit the resources rather than conserve them.

Fighting over water is already become a hot button issue for cities right here in Wisco next to Lake Michigan. Most municipalities had outlawed private well within the city limits. Gov't will control water even here.
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 03-19-2009, 08:58 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Eventually they discovered that all the water pouring through the sand brought up the salt levels in the soil to the point of nothing would grow again.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desertification
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 03-19-2009, 10:38 AM
bicmudpuppy's Avatar
bicmudpuppy bicmudpuppy is offline
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Aztec, NM
Posts: 2,792
Buffalo grass doesn't have that rich, dark green color we are used to for turf, but ?????you don't like the texture? I can show you golf courses in SW Kansas that have buffalo FAIRWAYS. I can show you field trial plots at K-State that, when mowed at 1" look great. At around 2", you get the flowers and seed heads starting to form and it does look a little ragged then. If you can provide a proper grade and mow it at under 2", I like 1.5", but you could go 1.75" without seeing the seed heads and flowers, you now have a lawn that doesn't want more than 2#N/ year and will do fine on half of that. It also will be VERY happy with 17" of total precipitation. The problem is it is a niche grass. It will not do well with more than 24" of total precip. For you southern guys, bermuda does quite well on low fert levels, but the fert needs to be applied at the worst time for everything else. July is great timing for a pound of nitrogen. Cut back the water and watch the bermuda LOVE the heat!! (I said cut back, not stop watering)
__________________
Over educated
Over Qualified
Glorified Ditch Digger
....but still a bargain compared to anything else.
And I NEVER say I told you so out loud.
How many Hats can you wear?
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 03-19-2009, 11:53 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,318
The Niche .......

Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:16 AM.

Page generated in 0.10448 seconds with 7 queries