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  #11  
Old 04-02-2009, 05:06 PM
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bicmudpuppy bicmudpuppy is offline
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Visuals usually sell better than reams of paper they have to read. If you can find a good healthy 4-6" sod plug, something 6-8" deep that has a good, rich, black soil look to it, and compare it to a core probed from their yard, you might be on to something. Explain the benefits of the richer soil (it looks darker and "better" because it has more SOM) compared to a light brown, sandy or clay soil. Now, if the yard in question looks nearly perfect, I would worry somewhat about pulling a core from the yard. You might find a soil profile that has flourished and will not be a good comparison for this purpose. A 1" soil probe that you can get a core sample from up to 12" deep is a great tool.
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  #12  
Old 04-02-2009, 08:32 PM
Ruben Rocha Ruben Rocha is offline
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I would suggest contacting your local extension service. Not sure where they are in Pasco county but you could start with.
http://www.prohort.net which is the hillsborough site or google ifas which is the state dept.
They are great people and have a lot of resources you can use.
They also offer ceu classes for licenses.
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  #13  
Old 04-02-2009, 08:36 PM
Ruben Rocha Ruben Rocha is offline
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BTW the local news say 350 people in the landscaping business will loose there job based on the new water restrictions. So I don't think there will be much opportunity to get additional business.
Since nobody will be able to water in new plants or grass.
And if you think that post is bad in the city of Tampa. No automatic watering is allowed after April 3. So people will be out in the dark with a hose to water the lawn.

Last edited by Ruben Rocha; 04-02-2009 at 08:44 PM.
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  #14  
Old 04-02-2009, 09:55 PM
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FOL FOL is offline
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Numerous homes in the area are either now on reclaimed water and the more established neighborhoods, homes have wells. Been to the Pinellas, Pasco, and Hernando extension offices. All great places.

Yes, most lawns are going to start dieing because there being pumped with chemicals and they are used to alot of water. I can not tell you how many chemical/pesticide treated signs I have seen, just recently pop up on peoples lawns the past 3 weeks. This is the reason these lawns need so much water is because of these methods. But with a different approach there is a possibility you can lower your water usage and keep your landscape looking decent. Most people down here over water there lawn anyway. So if people would actually start being educated properly about this, "which is what I am trying to do" some landscapes if maintained properly can survive.

You sir dont sound like an optimistic individual. The rain will come you need to do the rain dance.

Thanks for your everyones help.
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  #15  
Old 04-02-2009, 10:10 PM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FOL View Post
Numerous homes in the area are either now on reclaimed water and the more established neighborhoods, homes have wells. Been to the Pinellas, Pasco, and Hernando extension offices. All great places.

Yes, most lawns are going to start dieing because there being pumped with chemicals and they are used to alot of water. I can not tell you how many chemical/pesticide treated signs I have seen, just recently pop up on peoples lawns the past 3 weeks. This is the reason these lawns need so much water is because of these methods. But with a different approach there is a possibility you can lower your water usage and keep your landscape looking decent. Most people down here over water there lawn anyway. So if people would actually start being educated properly about this, "which is what I am trying to do" some landscapes if maintained properly can survive.

You sir dont sound like an optimistic individual. The rain will come you need to do the rain dance.

Thanks for your everyones help.
FOL and others in FL we have your backside, 2 products are being released in May for FL and the wet season ban so that you can continue to keep up the color and density that your customer expects and be compliant with the laws

FOL, you can sprig a lot of the varieties that you have down there, look up Pas Pallum, very low nutrient needs but finicky
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  #16  
Old 04-02-2009, 10:15 PM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
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OH and BTW ..............

Kiril meant to say...... compost does a soil good

Start there it is actually very simple
Good finished compost and compost teas are the basis of a great land care plan

It really is not any more complicated than that

You can drill down to the enth degree but in the end it is about fertile soil
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  #17  
Old 04-03-2009, 09:08 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Location: District 9 CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bicmudpuppy View Post
Visuals usually sell better than reams of paper they have to read. If you can find a good healthy 4-6" sod plug, something 6-8" deep that has a good, rich, black soil look to it, and compare it to a core probed from their yard, you might be on to something. Explain the benefits of the richer soil (it looks darker and "better" because it has more SOM) compared to a light brown, sandy or clay soil. Now, if the yard in question looks nearly perfect, I would worry somewhat about pulling a core from the yard. You might find a soil profile that has flourished and will not be a good comparison for this purpose. A 1" soil probe that you can get a core sample from up to 12" deep is a great tool.
I may provide something like this over the next few weeks. I have some soil samples to pull on one of my sites that has areas that have received compost pretty much yearly (sprinkler irrigated lawn) and areas that have only had mulch (drip irrigated beds), and areas that have had a mix.
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  #18  
Old 04-03-2009, 09:12 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by ICT Bill View Post
You can drill down to the enth degree but in the end it is about fertile soil
Yes, and even if you are sitting on a Class 1 soil with great SOM content, you still need water. People need to start thinking about losing the "traditional" lawn and start looking at native alternatives.
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  #19  
Old 04-03-2009, 09:18 AM
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FOL FOL is offline
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I forgot to mention I really like that concept bcmud. Thanks for the input.

By the way it RAINED!!!!
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  #20  
Old 04-03-2009, 09:20 AM
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bicmudpuppy bicmudpuppy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
I may provide something like this over the next few weeks. I have some soil samples to pull on one of my sites that has areas that have received compost pretty much yearly (sprinkler irrigated lawn) and areas that have only had mulch (drip irrigated beds), and areas that have had a mix.
Would love a picture or two of cores from those sites, compared to a clay profile managed by a spray and pray outfit for several years. We have talked in other posts about some of the "challenges" my artificial ecosystem presents. Many HO expect the "golf course" look from their lawn service. Yes, courses use synthetics, but the large majority of them are operated by ON SITE, educated professionals (I said most). We also do some intense maintenance items that the average HO just isn't willing to pay for. Things like multiple aerifications per season, repeated spoon feeding applications or fertigation, surface applied soil amendments like seaweed or kelp, etc. I know of courses with the kinds of budgets I dream of that top dress fairways 2-3 times per year. The guys that can budget that, are not top dressing with straight sand. It is a mix, and something along the lines of 15%+ peat or other organic matter to make up the mix. If the fairways are amended native soil, the mix is amended native soil. The top dressing would normally be heavier on the OM structure than the original construction mix. It did my heart good to see roots beyond what we could core on my greens this spring. Looks like I am 6-8"+ deep with roots to start the season. Last August, the bottom third of the 4" cores were void of roots.
__________________
Over educated
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Glorified Ditch Digger
....but still a bargain compared to anything else.
And I NEVER say I told you so out loud.
How many Hats can you wear?
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