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  #21  
Old 04-07-2009, 07:00 PM
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Originally Posted by BostonBull View Post
two things........

WHY are you pruning them? Define DEADWOOD. Is this the leafless stalks left in winter, or canes in the summer with NO foliage/buds/etc?
when i refer to dead wood, i am actually speaking of old wood. Whats left after winter. There are a few buds on them but they rarely survive. New growth always overpowers old growth.
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  #22  
Old 04-07-2009, 07:10 PM
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I am trying to learn here. there are major arguments about pruning hydrangeas.

my thoughts are why wound them, or grasses for that matter, unless there is a definite need for it. too big for the area/look desired, overgrown or getting too thick for the health of the plant, dead wood (real deadwood not bare stalks!).

so by your math, I've been doing it this way for years, that's my reason!

how much fert?

do you also split them like ornamental grasses when they are large enough?

I wish you, or someone here had an actual scientific reason for this type of pruning.

back to the topic at hand.......transplanting and then cutting these down this extremely is wrong.
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  #23  
Old 04-07-2009, 07:18 PM
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Nope. Dont split them but have propogated them. And yes, there is alot to be said for years of green thumb experience. I am not a scientist and neither are you. You can go by what you read in books but when you get right down to it and see the endless summer new growth completely overpower the old growth you realize the old growth isnt doing enough for the plant and just months of eyesore thats unnecessary.
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  #24  
Old 04-07-2009, 07:36 PM
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Nope. Dont split them but have propogated them. And yes, there is alot to be said for years of green thumb experience. I am not a scientist and neither are you. You can go by what you read in books but when you get right down to it and see the endless summer new growth completely overpower the old growth you realize the old growth isnt doing enough for the plant and just months of eyesore thats unnecessary.
the OP was NOT talking Endless summer/blushing bride variety.

Not saying WE are scientists but scientific proof is one reason why we do what we do.

What does not producing blooms have to do with photosynthesis, and nutrient production?
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Old 04-07-2009, 08:16 PM
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i had to transplant a endless summer hydrangea, i bought it as a 3 gallon and its been in the ground for about 3-4 years. i went ahead and cut it back to about 3" from the ground after i moved it. there is new growth, but i was wondering what to expect from the plant now ?

This is the original post.
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Old 04-07-2009, 08:17 PM
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the OP was NOT talking Endless summer/blushing bride variety.

Not saying WE are scientists but scientific proof is one reason why we do what we do.

What does not producing blooms have to do with photosynthesis, and nutrient production?
your photosynthesis comes from new green growth. Not brown/ cold burned stalks.
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  #27  
Old 04-07-2009, 08:25 PM
BostonBull BostonBull is offline
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huh? my photosynthesis? we are talking plant biology here. brown DORMANT stalks, not the dead tips, cold burned canes. photosynthesis is produced via the leaves, this in turn gives the plant its nutrients and health/well being.

you seem to be pruing for blooms, and personal preference....right?
not the health of the plant.
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  #28  
Old 04-07-2009, 08:27 PM
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huh? my photosynthesis? we are talking plant biology here. brown DORMANT stalks, not the dead tips, cold burned canes. photosynthesis is produced via the leaves, this in turn gives the plant its nutrients and health/well being.

you seem to be pruing for blooms, and personal preference....right?
not the health of the plant.

I am not going to debate symantics here. Photosyntheses occures in green leaves. New growth. I guess my picture perfect perenial beds are that way because i dont prune for the health of the plant.
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  #29  
Old 04-07-2009, 08:31 PM
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I also have hydrangea trees and japanese maples linning my inground pool as a privacy fence. I guess my my maples and hydrangea trees arnt meant to be used as a privacy fence. Its called pruning. You shape the plantings to fit your space and for the look achieved. Plantings are very versatile and to use the argument that pruning for only the "health" of the plant doesnt float in my book.
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  #30  
Old 04-07-2009, 08:36 PM
BostonBull BostonBull is offline
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I also have hydrangea trees and japanese maples linning my inground pool.
all green leaves produce sugars, not just new growth BTW

not sure of the signifigance of your above statement? I have dogwood, hickory, and azalea lining my driveway.


you cut these to the ground yearly too?
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