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Old 04-28-2009, 12:18 AM
Christian Brothers Christian Brothers is offline
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overseeding?

today i decided to put down scotts kentucky blugrass seed in my front yard. theres only one tree (pin oak) thats fully grown and its in the side yard so theres about 95% sun throughout the day so i know it will be a great spot for the grass to grow. my front yard has never been properly cared for before. the usual mowing once a week is about it. it is moslty broadleaf and crabgrass with a few spots of bermuda here and there. what i did was take a hare (however you spell it) and pull it behind the mower to till some of the soil. i didnt kill all the weeds first and till/cultivate the whole yard then spread the seed. i just used the hare and then scotts spreader to spread the seed. after that i watered it lightly. its supposed to rain tonight and i'm hoping the it will come a good shower. if not i'll water it again tomorrow morning. now that i've done that should i immediatly spread scotts seed starter fertilizer or does it make that much of a difference. i've read that after 4-6 weeks i can fertilize. am i taking the right approach to this? i know that it will take a while to have the entire front yard KBG but i dont mind. i just want it done right. any tips from any of you professionals? i havnt been doing this long. i'm still learning, fun, fun.

Christian Brothers Land and Lawn
At CB Land and Lawn our essential mission is to surpass customer satisfaction through our commendable foundation, continual honesty, admirable work and our passion towards what we do. We want to make you happier and healthier with a beautiful and environment-friendly lawn. We do not use any harmful chemicals with our weed spraying. It is all organic. Healthy for you and good for the environment. We can make a difference by doing our part. It starts in our own backyard. Give us a call so we can take care of all your lawn care needs the right way. FREE ESTIMATES so it is no cost to you to see what you can do to help this world move in the right direction.

Basic Services: Basic services include; mowing, trimming and edging.

Premium Services: Premium services include; all basic services + fertilization up to 4 times a year and organic weed control up to 4 times a year.

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what do yall think about that?
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  #2  
Old 04-28-2009, 12:33 AM
Christian Brothers Christian Brothers is offline
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could anyone give me some advice
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Old 04-28-2009, 12:35 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Seed does best with some kind of cover. That can be straw [on steep slopes], fabric if you like, compost or topsoil, even a rapid growing annual rye for shade and moisture for later in the season.

For adequate germination and growth - get soil contact and an adequate cover to preserve the moisure and shade. Compost is my favorite for performance on reasonably level ground.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 04-28-2009, 12:46 AM
Christian Brothers Christian Brothers is offline
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i thought about putting pine straw down...what do you think? i'm fixing to start my own compost pile. we run our business out of a well established landscape and nursery shop and he jsut got some manure there so we have access to some great manure. should i just put that down?
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Old 04-28-2009, 01:21 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Pine straw just doesn't seem to get along with grass... At least here in the North. We use Oat Straw and that doesn't do well either, except on slopes...
Having a compost pile of your own is a good idea, but to use it commercially you need to be sure that it is weed-free and properly cured.

I am still buying mine.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 04-28-2009, 01:26 AM
Christian Brothers Christian Brothers is offline
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lawnnut101 said, "Well compost or manure are more of a soil amendment per say. If your soil is in good condition to grow grass, then those probably aren't needed." so i said they were good for retaining water and shade so they wouldnt be bad right?
i really want to get a compost pile going. it will take me years to perfect it but i would eventually like to have where i can sell my own
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Old 04-28-2009, 02:18 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian Brothers View Post
lawnnut101 said, "Well compost or manure are more of a soil amendment per say. If your soil is in good condition to grow grass, then those probably aren't needed." so i said they were good for retaining water and shade so they wouldnt be bad right?
i really want to get a compost pile going. it will take me years to perfect it but i would eventually like to have where i can sell my own
Cool!! Meanwhile - get cover on your seed. Compost is the best for that.

Lawnnut is correct to a limitted extent IMHO.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #8  
Old 04-28-2009, 10:10 AM
Christian Brothers Christian Brothers is offline
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i agree...seed starter fertilizer and cover. thanks
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Old 04-28-2009, 01:04 PM
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EagleLandscape EagleLandscape is offline
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CB, how the heck do you "spray the weeds" with organic materials?

FYI, chemicals are not harmful if used properly.
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Old 04-28-2009, 02:02 PM
Christian Brothers Christian Brothers is offline
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chemicals are harmful because not only do they kill the weeds but they kill microbes, organisms and such that nature uses naturally to fertilize and maintain an eco-system. also think about this, if i am hired to spray and fertilize a yard and i use chemicals, those chemicals are harmful to pets and kids. maybe the customer dont have pets or kids which would be great but it is also in the air and i breathe it in or neighbors, etc. now say the customer has pets and kids. now you have to worry about keeping them off the lawn until its safe and then after that the chemicals are still trafficed in the house, vehicles etc. it may not seem like that big of a deal to some people but every man has his own thing. ours is keeping nature and our customers healthy. by using materials such as compost or mulch for example you can supress the weeds and add the microbes to the soil that naturally kill the weeds. there are also organic sprays you can purchase that have the same effect.
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