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  #51  
Old 06-24-2009, 10:04 PM
NattyLawn NattyLawn is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,647
Quote:
Originally Posted by WannaBeOrganic View Post
I've been reading good things about kelp for helping with various types of stress and recommendations to use it before summer. I decided to try a liquid fertilizer that contains kelp this summer to see how it works. If you're putting down Ringer Lawn Restore now you won't need to fertilize for a while so plain kelp is probably better for you if you want to try it. Lots of stuff online about kelp.
I know there are a lot of newbies on this forum, but do you think anyone's taking you seriously? You're a "homeowner" giving advice on a forum with mostly professionals. Do you think people are going to go buy kelp because you read it helped with stress and are going to use it before summer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
Like this one, from the same author as your referenced source on bone meal?

The Myth of Curative Kelp
Conclusions from researchers

1) Plant selection: “…working with resistant varieties seems to be the best solution [to disease
resistance].”

2) Environmental conditions: “…soil fertility and production conditions were more important growth
and yield determinants than were foliar sprays.”

3) Management techniques: “If proper planting techniques are followed, the use of biostimulants is
unwarranted.”

4) Overall assessment: “…treatments are ultimately dependent on multiple plant, soil, and
environmental factors, and often have no discernible effects.” “…there appears to be little value in
applying these products.”

5) Marketing: “Manufacturers’ claims for the benefits of these products go beyond what is
substantiated by the research.” “The number of products now on the market seems to outnumber the
published papers.”

These researchers’ conclusions say it all – seaweed extracts are aggressively marketed with little regard
for objective, scientific research. There is a final concern never addressed, which is the justification for
large-scale removal of vegetation from one ecosystem (the marine kelp “forests”) for application to
another (terrestrial landscapes). The ecological impacts of increased seaweed harvesting are currently
under investigation and the possibility of significant ecosystem damage is real. There is no argument that
seaweed products are useful and valuable to humans for the reasons discussed earlier. However, given
that there are few documented benefits from applying seaweed extracts to plants, this is not a justifiable
nor sustainable practice. The marketing of such products as “earth friendly” in this context should be
repugnant to environmentally conscious consumers.
You just kicked him over the internet....
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  #52  
Old 06-24-2009, 10:24 PM
MrC MrC is offline
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I got the Ringer at a local garden center.
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  #53  
Old 06-24-2009, 11:19 PM
WannaBeOrganic WannaBeOrganic is offline
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Posts: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by NattyLawn View Post
I know there are a lot of newbies on this forum, but do you think anyone's taking you seriously? You're a "homeowner" giving advice on a forum with mostly professionals. Do you think people are going to go buy kelp because you read it helped with stress and are going to use it before summer?
Did you bother to read the whole document or just the part that was quoted? Here's an excerpt from that very same document, which I have read before.

Quote:
There has been some success in utilizing seaweed extracts as a turf-enhancing treatment. The predominant research has focused on Kentucky bluegrass, where SE applications have been associated with improved seedling establishment, rooting, and increased drought and salinity tolerance. However, other research with the same plant material reported “little effect” after SE treatment. Seaweed extracts are also reported to improve root growth of bentgrass and improve the “physical strength” of environmentally stressed turf.
You can find more positive and negative opinions from independent sources. Nothing concrete but shows promise.

You seem to be one of the people that use compost tea on here. You might be interested to read what she has written about it. She wrote 4 articles about the myth of compost tea. compost tea myth I (pesticides), compost tea myth II (disease), another myth of compost tea and disease, along with the EPA's statement on compost tea, and the most recent compost tea myth article
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"turf is not sustainable, hence the reason why I strongly promote getting rid of it." - Kiril 1/14/2009
Is this what people paying for lawn service want?
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  #54  
Old 06-25-2009, 07:41 AM
dishboy dishboy is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: zone 6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NattyLawn View Post
I know there are a lot of newbies on this forum, but do you think anyone's taking you seriously? You're a "homeowner" giving advice on a forum with mostly professionals. Do you think people are going to go buy kelp because you read it helped with stress and are going to use it before summer?



You just kicked him over the internet....
Officer Natty is back on the beat I see!
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  #55  
Old 06-26-2009, 07:55 PM
longblade longblade is offline
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Join Date: May 2009
Location: F.W. TX.
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Well here’s my 2 cent’s. I believe the quickest and cheapest way to start an “organic” lawn fertilization program is… start using a mulching mower. Next stop putting down synthetic chemicals. Try to use a more natural approach to control pests and provide nutrients to the soil. Notice the word soil! In order to create a healthy lawn you need healthy soil. It’s very simple, you apply compost, lava sand, green sand, corn meal, dried molasses, “organic” fertilizers. There are no rules on this matter just simply quite using chemicals. When you add organic matter to the soil you activate the little guys that live there, like the worms. If you make the worms happy they poop more and we all know worm poop is good. I don’t choose any one brand, I try to mix it up a bit by trying different brand products and my lawn is beautiful. It’s simple, fun and safe.

Oh. My favorite part is when I apply the horticultural corn meal my 3 year helps and it’s a blast. She ends up wearing most of it on her clothes… good times. If it where chemicals we would not enjoy our company the same way.
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  #56  
Old 06-26-2009, 08:01 PM
WannaBeOrganic WannaBeOrganic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NattyLawn View Post
Leave it up to a top notch LCO like yourself to take advice from a novice who has no experience with the products they give advice on.
Where did I say I didn't have experience with the products? At least get it right. I said I never used the program but I used one of the products in the program, the Microbial Soil Conditioner. Two of the steps in Organica's program were basically CGM with some bacteria added. The same bacteria that are in the product I used.

Turns out I used another one of their products, Bio-Matrix and I just bought some more.

Hmm... what else did I recommend? Milk. I used it this year along with cornmeal. I'm the only lawn on the block without red thread.

Your friend keeps pestering me when I don't quote all my sources because this is such a high level forum and only verified statements must be made, unless they come from a sponsor.

Did everyone forget that the whole reason I posted in the first place was because someone misinterpreted the contents? I'm supposed to provide references to "peer reviewed" publications but it's ok if someone doesn't even read the label correctly?
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"turf is not sustainable, hence the reason why I strongly promote getting rid of it." - Kiril 1/14/2009
Is this what people paying for lawn service want?
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  #57  
Old 06-26-2009, 09:09 PM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
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That's enough wannabe
Thank you for participating
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  #58  
Old 06-26-2009, 11:02 PM
MrC MrC is offline
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Location: Jersey
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Longblade, thanks for bringing the post back on topic. I'll look into your list of fertilizers. I'm all about keeping it simple and fun.
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  #59  
Old 06-27-2009, 08:32 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,746
Quote:
Originally Posted by longblade View Post
Well here’s my 2 cent’s. I believe the quickest and cheapest way to start an “organic” lawn fertilization program is… start using a mulching mower. Next stop putting down synthetic chemicals. Try to use a more natural approach to control pests and provide nutrients to the soil. Notice the word soil! In order to create a healthy lawn you need healthy soil. It’s very simple, you apply compost, lava sand, green sand, corn meal, dried molasses, “organic” fertilizers. There are no rules on this matter just simply quite using chemicals. When you add organic matter to the soil you activate the little guys that live there, like the worms. If you make the worms happy they poop more and we all know worm poop is good. I don’t choose any one brand, I try to mix it up a bit by trying different brand products and my lawn is beautiful. It’s simple, fun and safe.

Oh. My favorite part is when I apply the horticultural corn meal my 3 year helps and it’s a blast. She ends up wearing most of it on her clothes… good times. If it where chemicals we would not enjoy our company the same way.
That is pretty much the most sensible route.
During the transition - here in the North - we can use synthetic once a year as a low maintenance, as we get the nutrient cycle started. That important time is in the fall.

When is it in Texas?
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*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #60  
Old 06-27-2009, 10:14 AM
MrC MrC is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2006
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When/what synthetic do you recommend in NJ?
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