Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-05-2009, 10:43 PM
Barefoot James's Avatar
Barefoot James Barefoot James is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 984
Kiril, Mudd, ICT this should intrest you!

"Calcium and Magnesium are the foundation Cation's that are alkaline positive charged Cation's that must dominate the saturation of the Cation Exchange Sites of a soil. The most important material for providing the Electronegativity of a soil (the Cation Exchange Capacity of a soil) and the ability to hold onto these base and acid cation's is the biomolecule called Humus - the Humic Acids."
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-06-2009, 07:36 AM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
LawnSite Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Howard County MD
Posts: 4,120
James
Says who???
Sounds like a humic acid salesman to me

Don't believe everything you hear, it depends on the conditions of the soil that you are working with, it may not even be soil, it could just be dirt

Bulk soil and rhizosphere soil are 2 different things
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-06-2009, 08:58 AM
Tim Wilson Tim Wilson is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 797
[QUOTE][The most important material for providing the Electronegativity of a soil (the Cation Exchange Capacity of a soil) and the ability to hold onto these base and acid cation's is the biomolecule called Humus - the Humic Acids." /QUOTE]


Quote:
Norman Q. Arancon, Clive. A. Edwardsa, Stephen Leea and Robert Byrnea
aSoil Ecology Laboratory, The Ohio State University, 400 Aronoff Laboratory, 318 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

Available online 14 July 2006.
Abstract
The interactions between earthworms and microorganisms can produce significant quantities of plant growth hormones and humic acids which act as plant regulators. Experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of humic acids extracted from vermicompost and compare them with the action of commercial humic acid in combination with a commercial plant growth hormone, indole acetic acid (IAA) which is a commonly found in vermicomposts. In the first experiments, humic acids were extracted from cattle, food and paper waste vermicomposts. They were applied to a plant growth medium, Metro-Mix360 (MM360), at rates of 0, 250 or 500 mg humates kg−1 dry wt. of MM360, to marigold, pepper, and strawberry plants in the greenhouse. Substitution of humates ranging from 250 to 1000 mg kg−1 MM360 increased the growth of marigold and pepper roots, and increased the growth of roots and numbers of fruits of strawberries significantly. In other experiments, humic acids extracted from food waste vermicomposts were applied at a rate of 500 mg kg−1 dry wt. of MM360, singly or in combination with IAA at a rate of 10−5 μM, to pepper seedlings. This experiment was designed to compare the differences in effects between the most effective dosage rate of humic acid from food waste, a phytohormone (IAA), and a commercial source of humic acid. The numbers of pepper flowers and fruits increased significantly in response to treatment with humic acid, IAA and a combination of humic acid and IAA. Peppers treated with humic acids extracted from food waste vermicomposts produced significantly more fruits and flowers than those treated with commercially-produced humic acids.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...ae090f7f60b58e
This is one reason I use vermicompost.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-06-2009, 09:07 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,314
Sounds like an answer to an exam question. Out of 10 points, I give it a 3.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-06-2009, 10:22 AM
Grohorganic's Avatar
Grohorganic Grohorganic is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Southern Florida
Posts: 157
there is some great debate on this one just as we speak. some are less inclined to see them as they are,IMO

and the test question answer; belly flop.LOL
__________________
I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-06-2009, 10:23 AM
turfbuilder's Avatar
turfbuilder turfbuilder is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: New Red State, USA
Posts: 450
I want to begin to offer organic fertilization to my clients that want it. But I have to tell you guys this forum can get pretty confusing on which product or which application works. Seems like nothing but arguing and different opinions.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-06-2009, 10:39 AM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
LawnSite Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Howard County MD
Posts: 4,120
Quote:
Originally Posted by turfbuilder View Post
I want to begin to offer organic fertilization to my clients that want it. But I have to tell you guys this forum can get pretty confusing on which product or which application works. Seems like nothing but arguing and different opinions.
certainly different opinions, that is because of background and location, Mr Gro on here has a 12 month season, you on the otherhand have a 6 month season. He works with warm season grasses, you with cool season grasses.

What works for you may not work for him. Excuse the blatent plug for our company

Just move your program over to our product line to begin with and then move from there. That is how several on here have started, half of them grow their own worms now. It is an easy place to start and will give you good to great results

I prefer soluble humate, vermicompost is the bomb, I make during the summer in my backyard. I haven't had the courage to bring them indoors for winter
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-06-2009, 10:43 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,314
Everything begins and ends with your soil. Build good soil structure while increasing natural nutrient retention and turnover and you have won half of the battle.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-06-2009, 12:47 PM
starry night's Avatar
starry night starry night is online now
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ohio's North Coast
Posts: 2,047
Quote:
Originally Posted by turfbuilder View Post
I want to begin to offer organic fertilization to my clients that want it. But I have to tell you guys this forum can get pretty confusing on which product or which application works. Seems like nothing but arguing and different opinions.
We all have so much to learn! And we (if I may include me as a relative newcomer) are all passionate about this subject! So let the arguing and the different opinions continue. We'll get it right eventually.

I noticed that TruGreen raked in $1.4 billion in 2008. That's a huge market for us to tap into.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-06-2009, 12:48 PM
DUSTYCEDAR's Avatar
DUSTYCEDAR DUSTYCEDAR is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: PA
Posts: 5,171
i use Elmer's glue
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:48 PM.

Page generated in 0.11445 seconds with 7 queries