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Old 07-20-2000, 12:03 AM
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Jason Jason is offline
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Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Michigan (Lennon)
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Just got a call from a customer, I've done work for in the past.They want a beach. They have a house with lakeside frontage. The lawn is two tiers, with the smaller tier along the water. <p>Haven't been to the site to measure yet. Just a brief conversation on the phone. I'm guessing the lake frontage is about 150 feet. The bottom tier of turf would be 150 X 20 feet.<p>What they want is the turf removed. And then have sand brought in to make a beach.<p>Thinking this might be over my head. I have concerns with erosion. Don't see how the sand will stay in place. The slope is slight maybe 5 to 10 degrees max. I just think the water would constantly wash the sand away.<p>Another problem, and it is a major one is access. The driveway is at the back of the house, while the lake is in front. One side of the house has chain link fence running from the road down to the lake. The other side is the only way to access the lake. And there it is roughly 6 feet wide. No way to get a truck down there. And I imagine it's going to take quite a few truck loads of sand. Not to mention getting equipment down there to remove turf, and grade.<p>I'm probably going to pass on this one, but I'm going to hate to. Looks like a lot of money on this job. Going to go and look at it next weekend and do some measuring and figuring.<p>Any ideas?
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Old 07-20-2000, 12:32 AM
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Stonehenge Stonehenge is offline
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This is just a side note - you'll want to at least talk to someone at the DNR to be sure you can do this. Around here, anything within 50' of water needs their OK. They might even be able to give you some ideas.
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Old 07-20-2000, 10:00 AM
Scraper Scraper is offline
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You may also want to check with the US Army Corps of Engineers as well. They deal with anything involving water. <p>I don't think erosion would be a problem unless you are talking a huge lake with waves, but even then you wouldn't be dealing with too much undercuerrent which would draw the sand out into the lake.
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Old 07-20-2000, 02:44 PM
Alan Alan is offline
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I've seen it done and it is a constqnt battle to keep the &quot;beach&quot; intact. If there is any wave action at all it tends to draw sand down the slope. Better check on all the possible permits needed and even the legality of placing material on a body of water. Might be no problem at all,, but then it might be a very real hassle. As for access, a skid steer sounds like the tool of choice on this one, dump as close as possible then bucket the material into place. Sounds like a fun job with a bunch of profit potential. Don't rule it out too quickly. If they have the money to do it it seems almost immoral to not help them spend it.
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  #5  
Old 07-20-2000, 03:32 PM
Guido Guido is offline
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Jason, that sounds like a good job man, I would try all you can not to pass it up, but make sure the money's there for it. As far as the washing away, you'll probobly have to go some ways into the water 10-15' with sand also, so you have some room to play with if it does start washing away. You'll also have to use some type of physical weed barrier sheet, or similiar product or it will be a mess!! You said one side has a fence, you can take off the material very easily, then just remove one pole while your working the job. Hope it all works out for you, let us know what happens!<p>And Sorry Scraper, I'm just an Air Force Combat Engineer, a dummy compared to those Army C O E, but I hope that was a joke in your post, cause I never saw the Army C O E consult a small landscape job!! LOL<p><br><p>----------<br>&lt;a href=&quot;http://communities.msn.com/guidosequipmentpics/&quot;&gt;&quot;Guido&quot;&lt;/a&gt;<br>David M. Famiglietti
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  #6  
Old 07-20-2000, 03:51 PM
BRL BRL is offline
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Guido,<br>He's not joking. If you do anything near water around here the ACE does the final approvals in conjuntion with local & state authorities on the plans.
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  #7  
Old 07-20-2000, 08:33 PM
JML JML is offline
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My cousin built a nice sized beach here in Jersey. About 50 tri-axle loads of sand, had his dozer dropped off and just graded it slightly towards the water. It seemed very easy and he made a killing all in a days work. Make sure you work at low tide and you are out before high tide comes in...
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  #8  
Old 07-20-2000, 08:45 PM
paul paul is offline
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I've done some of this work in rivers and lakes for park districts and for the ACE. <p>First you need permits from the ACE and or from your flood control district. If you reduce any flood plain or reduce the amount of water holding capicaty, you must make it up most times by 1.5 times the amount lost someplace else on the same property. <p>Now for the how to do it part.<br>first excavate below water line a shelf 1 to 1 1/2' deep, then grade it back until you are to the turf line, this should be 2 times high water line at least and 1 foot deep. Place a fabric (nonwoven 10 oz.) starting at your deepest point. leave about 2'-3' extra at this end. start placeing your sand at the bottom for about 1' back towards the shore fold the fabric over this sand and place more sand on top of the fabric. This gives you a toe that will reduce the amount of eroision that will take place. Now just fill up the foot that you cut out all the way back. Type of sand that works best is a torpedo sand its not very fine but stays in place better than masons sand.<p>----------<br>paul<br>
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Old 07-21-2000, 03:14 AM
Guido Guido is offline
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Sorry, Scraper, I stand corrected. Thats news to me though!<p>----------<br>&lt;a href=&quot;http://communities.msn.com/guidosequipmentpics/&quot;&gt;&quot;Guido&quot;&lt;/a&gt;<br>David M. Famiglietti
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  #10  
Old 07-24-2000, 10:50 AM
Scraper Scraper is offline
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That's okay Guido...you learn something new everyday! I just happen to work in the environmental department of a major law firm (for the time being). Definitely have to be careful when you are doing anything near water! Glean lots of useful knowledge from the job from time to time. Hopefully be out full-time next year doing what I enjoy!!!<p><p><p>&lt;font size=&quot;1&quot;&gt;Edited by: Scraper<br><p><font size="1">Edited by: Scraper
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