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Old 05-12-2002, 11:18 PM
turfinator turfinator is offline
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Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
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"Seasons" organic fertilizer VS Milorganite

I'm hoping to offer my customers an organic option next year. I want to experiment this year on my own lawn and see which of these 2 products give the best results. I have heard alot of good things about milorganite but very little about Season's 6-2-4 product. Both of these products are available locally and was curious if anyone has had negative experiences with either product or if one product is favored over the other.
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Old 05-13-2002, 01:21 PM
lawnstudent lawnstudent is offline
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I've used straight milorganite and don't like it. Straight milorganite is only 6 - 2 - 0 if I remember correctly. It's not a balanced fert. I see a lot of Kentucky Bluegrass and potassium needs are almost has high as N. I now use a "bridged" organic 15 - 1- 10 w/50% milorganite. Far superior results. Also have used Roots 8 - 2 - 6. Both outperform straight milorganite. I have no experience with Seasons's fert, but the grade looks superior (if milorganite is still only 6 - 2 - 0). Good luck.

jim
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Old 05-13-2002, 01:27 PM
lawnstudent lawnstudent is offline
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turfinator,

just another thought. Organics are highly dependant upon soil temp/microbe activity. I like adding any organic material to the soil. Helps build better soil structure and orgnaics are suppose to help prevent diseases, but a straight organic maybe a problem up their in Canada? You might consider a product that contains both organic - slow release and a synthetic organic (urea) fast release that works in a wider soil temp range. Just my humble opion. Take it for what its worth. Good luck.

jim
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Old 05-13-2002, 06:24 PM
turfinator turfinator is offline
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I took your advice and bought a couple of bags of the Seasons fert. The guy at the place I purchased it from didnt seem to knowledgable about the stuff so he couldnt really tell me too much. All I can say is this stuff sure is expensive. A couple of bags cost me $18 each. If I buy 20 or more they would reduce it to $14-15 per bag. It claims that each bag covers 5000 sq. ft. but I wonder if it should go on heavier? The fellow also suggeseted spraying straight iron on the lawn for similiar but not as long lasting results.
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Old 05-13-2002, 07:08 PM
lawnstudent lawnstudent is offline
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You hit on the biggest problem with an all organic program. The costs are high because the nutrient content is so low. Here are the main problems with organic:

1) low nurient content

2) high costs

2) nutrient content inconsistent

3) requires high soil temps/not effective with low soil temps

Here are main benefits:

1) long term use improves soil structure (formation of soil PEDS)

2) adds micorbes to soil

3) doesn't burn

4) slow release, no growth spurts

5) helps to prevent some turf diseases

I have a customer that that is all she will use on 14K sq. ft. lawn because her dog eats the fert and gets sick on the synthetic organics. Good luck.

jim
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Old 05-13-2002, 10:20 PM
turfinator turfinator is offline
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You mentioned soil temps. What would ideal outside temps be for adequate soil temp. We have been having very cool nights and highs of 10 - 15 degrees during the day here. As far as effectiveness goes, Im going to assume that it would be fine to put down now but it just wouldnt become effective until temps are higher? Also Im curious as to how often this type of fert would have to be applied.
http://www.agriorganics.com/products/seasons.html
Thanks
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Old 05-14-2002, 09:26 AM
lawnstudent lawnstudent is offline
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Soil temps over 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees C) and soil microbes will be active. No problem putting down organic before soil temps are right. When soil warms and microbes active, nutrients will be released if adequet soil moisture exist. Put organic down at same rates as regular fert. 1Lb N / M per app and number apps you need for your grass type. You can reduce app rate and use more apps just as you can with any fert.


Outside temps not good indicator of soil temp. Too many variables like shade on soil, vegatative cover, amount of soil moisture, soil texture, soil color, amount of sun, ambient air temps etc.


jim
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