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  #51  
Old 12-05-2009, 10:44 PM
ted putnam's Avatar
ted putnam ted putnam is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tlg View Post
. In a perfect world all lawns are thick, green watered and mowed properly to prevent crabgrass. In the real world most customers never even come close to maintaining their lawns with good cultural practices..... leaving us LCO's opting for products like a pre to give us some sort of edge.
Well said... Let's see should I apply a pre-emergent once and control 95% of the weeds for 95% of the growing season in marginal areas of the lawn or skip it because of temporary root pruning and pound the dog sh!t out of it every 6-7 weeks with 2,4-D, MSMA, quinclorac or anything else that might be in our bag of tricks in an attempt to keep weeds under control...and let's not forget...the customer off our back?? Some things are just beyond the LCO's control...and some things aren't. In business(and let's face it, most of us aren't doing this for a hobby) the ultimate goal is to keep the customer happy. To me it's pretty obvious of the methods discussed which causes the least amount of impact to reach the ultimate goal.
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  #52  
Old 12-05-2009, 10:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dishboy View Post
Okay, show me a plug of turf showing the root mass on a 25 year Pre-M lawn and I'll show you one of a lawn four years without.
Not all pre M's are root inhibitors. Your basis for this arguement is flawed.
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  #53  
Old 12-06-2009, 09:13 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Originally Posted by dishboy View Post
Okay, show me a plug of turf showing the root mass on a 25 year Pre-M lawn and I'll show you one of a lawn four years without.
That's not even nice...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #54  
Old 12-06-2009, 10:01 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPnTX View Post
all that would depend on the circumstances. Are we renovating a lawn that has major issue. what are those issues?

If you are attempting to improve a lawn by overseeding and there is a third party who's involvment may be to your detriment, one of you is going to have to manage the job. With no management what would you expect? Since you have the most to loose I would think you should be the one to manage the schedule. Its probably best to seed in the fall if possible anyway which would make things a lot more simple for you.
There is no altering the 6 step program for the 3rd party squirt 'n fert guys. Fall would work, but that is when the second round of blanket broadleaf is sprayed. Just as the seedlings are emerging. No room for the 3 week window, because our season is so short, especially if the use granular.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #55  
Old 12-06-2009, 12:12 PM
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New seedlings can sometimes withstand a properly applied weed control. When it says on the label "Do not apply to new seedling" I suspect they are just being cautious. They don't want to pay for your new seed. It is not unusual for customers to seed in the spring--yet I seldom hear of anyone having to reseed due to herbicide treatment. Grass is not a broadleaf--new grass or old.
But maybe you can get the 3rd party to hit it early, say first week of Sept. Sow your seed second week of Sept. Or...Sow your seed at the time of warmest soil temp (and quickest germination) 2nd week of August. Try to get them to delay fall weedo until late Sept. Or trade for a late October winterizer feeding. They should not object as long as they get paid the same.
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  #56  
Old 12-07-2009, 06:28 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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I played that game for a while and got nothing. Finally told the HO they would have to fire TGCL if they want me to grow grass, which some do. I won't even try to grow grass for people who maintain a separate squirt n fert service.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #57  
Old 12-19-2009, 10:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPnTX View Post
Around here in Bermuda if you don't use pre-em's your going to be fighting a loosing battle at the very least with crabgrass. Plain and simple. Bluegrass poa annua too.

In this business it's bid bid bid and bid some more. Bottom line. Adequate quality with the lowest overhead sometimes means you buy the best product.


Time Money or Quality. You only get to choose 2.
Just curious how you are preventing crabgrass with a November application? Or are you talking in general?

With our overseeded properties, I normally do not do a fall pre-emergent application. If the rye is thick enough and healthy enough then there are minimal weeds that we spot spray.

To the argument for most everyone on this subject, (what it has gone to) the best pre-emergent is a thick, healthy, aggressive turf.

I still do a split app in January and early March to keep a handle on crabgrass and poa. Just please don't label me a tree hugger from the above sentence.
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  #58  
Old 12-20-2009, 08:27 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoots View Post
Just curious how you are preventing crabgrass with a November application? Or are you talking in general?

With our overseeded properties, I normally do not do a fall pre-emergent application. If the rye is thick enough and healthy enough then there are minimal weeds that we spot spray.

To the argument for most everyone on this subject, (what it has gone to) the best pre-emergent is a thick, healthy, aggressive turf.

I still do a split app in January and early March to keep a handle on crabgrass and poa. Just please don't label me a tree hugger from the above sentence.
No dice... you're a bluddy tree hugger... "don't do unnecessary applications..."
Well, doo-dee-doo. ... you're probably a Communist too...
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,,, I wonder what does...
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