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  #11  
Old 01-13-2010, 07:20 PM
AWJ Services AWJ Services is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fieldman12 View Post
Hmm, I'm taking it he only has issues with the pad that has been there for 30 years. Granted I have not seen the soil that is there to know how it is but I dont see how after setting that long you gonna get it in any better shape. Anyway you could have a couple other professional opinions on this before going to all that trouble? I think I would have someone test that small piece first even if it is a different company before I go through all of that. You said it also is maybe a 4' cut and fill. I would assume all of the water does drain away fron it at least I hope. I really think you should get a professional excavators opinion. Not to knock an engineer but then again I think I would get someone that specializes in compaction first before I took his word. The stuff that is parked on it? How does it appear to be sitting as far as sinking goes?
Uncompacted soil will not compact over time. Parking on top of it will only compact the upper layer of soil. Maybe 12 inches down.
The only way to properly compact the soil is determined by the actual compaction needed as established by the engineer. Different soils compact differently, like sand for instance does not compact so unless someone has actual experience with area they cannot accurately instruct you on how to compact the soil.
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  #12  
Old 01-13-2010, 10:53 PM
Fieldman12 Fieldman12 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AWJ Services View Post
Uncompacted soil will not compact over time. Parking on top of it will only compact the upper layer of soil. Maybe 12 inches down.
The only way to properly compact the soil is determined by the actual compaction needed as established by the engineer. Different soils compact differently, like sand for instance does not compact so unless someone has actual experience with area they cannot accurately instruct you on how to compact the soil.
Yes, I understand all that but around here at least for something like that it would be compacted in lifts. I guess I just have a hard time thinking someone would have done 4' of cut and fill and would have not compacted it as they went along especially since it was suppose to be for a pad in the first place. I agree it depends on the soil type like you and me mentioned.
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  #13  
Old 01-13-2010, 11:13 PM
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bobcatuser bobcatuser is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toomuchtime View Post
Fieldman: my thoughts exactly. Im going to have a excavation company out today to see his thoughts.The problem with this is around here work is scarce and it is hard to find honest companys right now. If he says no it doesnt need re graded he doesnt get paid. The pad is COMPACTED no sinking hard as a rock. My enigneer on this project has been dead on throughout this process his suggestions have worked.From his stand point he is saying that long ago when it was originally graded were I live was just rural land and there is no way it is compacted correctly or they would have paid and got it certified as the house pad was.

bobcatuser is roller made by bobcat?
It has a bobcat S/N and the tag says Mexico. I don't know who makes it for them.
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  #14  
Old 02-09-2010, 03:54 AM
gammon landscaping gammon landscaping is offline
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i would just scratch it up a little and get a 433 cat and roll it all day and call for a inspect
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  #15  
Old 02-10-2010, 03:28 PM
bearmtnmartin bearmtnmartin is offline
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Try shopping for a new engineer. Some of them don't even do the actual test. Maybe you can dig a hole and get it passed based on soil composition. Its all about ass covering , not compaction.
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  #16  
Old 02-10-2010, 08:53 PM
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YellowDogSVC YellowDogSVC is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toomuchtime View Post
Thank you guys for the help! That's What I wanted to hear! I'm pretty efficent
with the bobcat just never done compaction. But would love to learn.I'm not sure
on the soil type.Yes California is a pain in the ass!!!!!!!! Does any one have any
experince with bobcat vibratory roller?
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I use a bobcat 48" roller. I have passed nuclear tests with it. I pack, crush, and roll base, caliche, dirt, and even gravel. It works good and with a little moisture, you will lock that material in. I prefer to roll in phases, that is, cut, fill, roll, then do it again so that each layer gets compacted but you can probably get enough vibration to get it down deep.
You might want to try a 72" roller and use it on a 26-30 gpm machine (I think they are high flow rollers). I use mine on 20-22 gpm, however, and it works fine.
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  #17  
Old 02-10-2010, 09:12 PM
curtisfarmer curtisfarmer is offline
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Where we live you can compact what ever you wnat to what ever compaction factor....but after 1 freeze thaw cycle, its back to what it was. Water expands 8% when frzen any gravel pad or road/drive expands up...thaws...and tight compaction is gone
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  #18  
Old 02-10-2010, 10:39 PM
toomuchtime toomuchtime is offline
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Good info guys. We will be tackleing the job on saturday stay tuned for pics!
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  #19  
Old 02-18-2010, 12:19 AM
RHS RHS is offline
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If you want to go quick and dirty you could add some portland cement to the mix and essentially make a soil cement. A bit of water and compaction and you will have a pretty solid mixture. Just a thought if you are only looking to pass the test as cost effectively as possible.?????
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