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  #11  
Old 02-08-2010, 11:06 PM
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foreplease foreplease is offline
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I brought a book home tonight so I could give you the full title and author. Although soccer is not mentioned in the title, I guarantee there is a lot of information in it that will help you out as you plan and undertake this work. I refer to it often.

Baseball and Softball Fields
Design, Construction, Renovation, and Maintenance

by Jim Puhalla, Jeff Krans, and Mike Goatley
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  #12  
Old 02-09-2010, 08:06 AM
marquis de sod marquis de sod is offline
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Foreplease,
Thanks so much! I will surely be able to find it on the University interlibrary loan system. I will check it out. And I got an appointment with the Western Ill. U. groundskeeping foreman about their fields. Thanks again for the help.
Jeff
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  #13  
Old 02-18-2010, 09:35 PM
Blueflashturf Blueflashturf is offline
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Good rule of thumb.... one hundred (100) linear ft. per thousand sq. ft of turf.. as for depth etc... trench 3 ft deep, then fill up with about 4 inches of pea gravel, then add another 6-8 inches of pea gravel in on top of that, if that does not perc fast enough fill it even more, you should have at least a good 12 inches of rootzone though... Sand is ok.. but not fast enough, topsoil,, jesus christ sakes no!!!!!!! 4 inch drain tile, herringbone pattern, 100ft/m, backfilled with gravel you will be just fine.... this is the right way....
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  #14  
Old 02-19-2010, 10:40 AM
marquis de sod marquis de sod is offline
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Thanks Blueflashturf, I'm a bit confused by the backfill instructions, though. Are you saying to put 4" of pea gravel, then soil, then another 6-8" of pea gravel and use a sand/soil mixture for the top 12" of rootzone?
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  #15  
Old 02-20-2010, 08:23 PM
Blueflashturf Blueflashturf is offline
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Dig your trench... lay 2 inches of peagravel in the bottom... then lay your drain tile... then another 6-8 inches, then the rootzone should be the other 10-12 inches....
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  #16  
Old 02-21-2010, 08:37 AM
marquis de sod marquis de sod is offline
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Blueflashturf,
Ok, got it , now it makes sense.
Thanks
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  #17  
Old 02-21-2010, 09:48 PM
Blueflashturf Blueflashturf is offline
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No problem man... Let us know how it goes.. When yall get done, you should post a thread telling about the process and have pics or somethin.. would love to see how it goes!!! Good luck, let me know if you need anything else...
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  #18  
Old 02-21-2010, 11:12 PM
marquis de sod marquis de sod is offline
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That's a good idea, we won't get rolling til mid-July but I'll have soil tests and will know what our "budget" will be as far as irrigation and tiling by then. I'll try and keep you posted. I could use the photos for my website as well.Thanks again for all your help.
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  #19  
Old 02-22-2010, 08:18 AM
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foreplease foreplease is offline
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Additional thoughts on your project:
  • Keeping records of your progress (photos) is a very good idea; the more the better.
  • Part of measuring results is knowing how the weather, especially rain, impacts your field's ability to handle scheduled practices and games. In my most complete and formal Annual Maintenance Plans, I include historical temperature and precipitation information. I compare the previous year's actual weather to the long term trends, taken from our county's soil survey book (see attached document). These two web sites provide a dizzying amount of information: Weather Underground and Weather. Familiarity with the weather can help you in a couple ways (in addition to anticipating your turf's needs for irrigation, mowing, fertilizer, fungicides, etc.).
  1. Establish realistic standards and goals. Example: Following a typical 1.5" rain, this field shall have no standing water 60 minutes from the time it stops raining.
  2. Make good projections. Example: Depending on wind and temperature, we can expect this field to be out of service for 48 hours after it stops raining when 2.5" or more has fallen in a 24-hour period.
  • Even though these things may be obvious or intuitive to the person caring for the field, having it out there in the plan helps with expectations. I sometimes break it down further speculating something like this: In a typical nine game home schedule, we can expect to have a game postponed to another day once every 2 1/2 seasons. (fictitious example).
  • The 3' - 4' depth for your tile is too deep in my opinion. You want it below the level of the irrigation work and the irrigation lines must be deeper than deep tine aerating might someday hit. From the playing surface to the top of irrigation lines should be approximately 12". The top edge of your tile should be approximately 16" below the surface. University recommendations and input from irrigation and drain tile installation people in your area should guide you.
  • Too often I see inadequate irrigation on athletic fields. For baseball fields, the last row is often in an arc parallel to the outfield fence, throwing water to the fence. There should be another row of heads throwing back to the one I described. Most of your field will receive double coverage (at least). If you fail to put in this last row, the coverage will be poor between the last row in the outfield and the fence. For football and soccer, I frequently see the last row along the length of the field 20' - 30' inside the touch or side line. Like the baseball example above, you need another row throwing back to the last row that lies "in bounds." I sometimes describe irrigation as a controlled series of leaks whereby you move unevenly dry areas as far from the center-line of play as possible.
  • For soccer, provide a quick coupler hose connection near (behind) each goal so that these areas can be more intensively maintained by hand when necessary. Dragging hoses half the length of the field, or wherever the nearest hose connection is, is a drag.
  • For football and soccer fields, where repairs and over-seeding "between the hash marks" often need to be done, you want the irrigation zones running the length of the field. This will enable you to water the center of the field more, when necessary. If the zones run parallel to the end zone lines you will be frustrated later. It happens!
  • Make sure you get an as-built drawing, even if you have to do it yourself. It's fine to have a sketch or a blueprint of how you plan to install irrigation and drain lines, but when you need to find a line later you can end up doing a lot of futile and/or damaging hand digging looking for things that are not located where they are on the original plan.

We rarely get to participate on the front end like this. Make the most of it!

weather historical data vs actual 2008.pdf
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  #20  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:08 AM
marquis de sod marquis de sod is offline
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Foreplease,
It never ceases to amaze me , the quantity and quality of information that members are willing to share. Thank you. All very good practices that could easily have been thought of after the need arose. I will share the ideas with our maintenance foreman as well.
The baseball and softball field book you referenced just arrived at the interlibrary loan desk so I'll get that picked up today. My next practical question will be what type of trencher to use with the tile. We were counting on a local farmer with an ag type field tile machine putting them in at 2 1/2 to 3 feet and the volunteers doing the back filling with the chosen materials but I don't know if they can go as shallow as 16" or if we need the width of the trench they would make. Would a simple self propelled Ditch Witch be the machine of choice? Our contractor who will be doing the field has several in his rental business we may be able to use. And could we not lay irrigation lines in the same ditch as the drainage tile?
I especially appreciate the insight on the layout of the zones, the quick attach hydrants and having lines all the way to the edge of the fields. We would have fallen into the inexperienced minimum coverage category.
Thanks again for the help
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Last edited by marquis de sod; 02-22-2010 at 10:09 AM. Reason: spelling
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