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  #51  
Old 02-21-2010, 07:41 PM
Diamond Dave Diamond Dave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Rose View Post
You must have a CDL to operate:
Any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight
rating (GVWR) of 26,001 pounds or more.
A trailer with a GVWR of more than 10,000 pounds
if the gross combination weight rating (GCWR) is
26,001 pounds or more.
I would read that to mean only if that 10,000 or more trailer puts you over that 26,000 mark. So for example you should be able to tow a 14K dump trailer with a 10,400GVW F350 pickup and be fine. But hook it to a 13K dually and you would need a CDL A.
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  #52  
Old 02-21-2010, 08:18 PM
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grassman177 grassman177 is offline
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what about what i mentioned as one of you asked, who does mine fair in your opinions to the cdl debate??
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  #53  
Old 02-21-2010, 09:12 PM
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Landscraper1 Landscraper1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Outdoors_Unlimited View Post
My understanding was any trailer 10,001 or more you needed a CDL. No matter what the combined weight is.
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Correct. If you pull any trailer with a GVW over 10,000LB, you need a CDL
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  #54  
Old 02-21-2010, 09:19 PM
FryDaddy FryDaddy is offline
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This may be a stupid/dumb reply, but just use one 3.5k axle & one 5.2k axle. Don't know if its even possible or what would happen, but problem solved. Well, going back to lala land.
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  #55  
Old 02-21-2010, 09:38 PM
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Landscraper1 Landscraper1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FryDaddy View Post
This may be a stupid/dumb reply, but just use one 3.5k axle & one 5.2k axle. Don't know if its even possible or what would happen, but problem solved. Well, going back to lala land.
Trailer cannot be made that way
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  #56  
Old 02-21-2010, 09:41 PM
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Landscraper1 Landscraper1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diamond Dave View Post
I would read that to mean only if that 10,000 or more trailer puts you over that 26,000 mark. So for example you should be able to tow a 14K dump trailer with a 10,400GVW F350 pickup and be fine. But hook it to a 13K dually and you would need a CDL A.
Wrong, No matter the situation, if your trailer is over 10,000 gvw, you need a CDL. Not even a class B would cut it. You would need a Class A CDL license.
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  #57  
Old 02-21-2010, 11:09 PM
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Jason Rose Jason Rose is offline
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Well I guess after 56 posts on this thread we have all seen the same thing, piss poor wording on behalf of the DOT website, haha. I guess when I order my new one I'll do as advised by others, and by the trailer dealer and have it registered for 9900 lbs.

Now, a side question, is the 10,000 lb rule for ANYONE pulling the trailer or is it only for those using them for a business? If it's for anyone I could name a dozen people right off the top of my head that are "illegal" and should have a class A CDL. Those are just friends and family, lol. My parents have a car hauler, horse trailer, and a dump trailer. All rated over 10K.
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  #58  
Old 02-21-2010, 11:57 PM
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dwc dwc is offline
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Location: oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Rose View Post
You must have a CDL to operate:
Any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight
rating (GVWR) of 26,001 pounds or more.
A trailer with a GVWR of more than 10,000 pounds
if the gross combination weight rating (GCWR) is
26,001 pounds or more.


It's worded poorly, in my opinion. See the bold line in the above quote from the page. To me it reads both ways, but I guess I'm reading it incorrectly.

Then WHY would people choose to have a 10,400 GCWR trailer scaled back to 9900? There would be no point unless you were just that close to being over with your truck/trailer combo.
If this is like Oklahoma, that is saying you have to have a CDL IF you pull your trailer with a truck with a gcwr of 26,001 or more, which would mean pulling that trailer with a Class 6 medium duty or larger.
The gcwr of my rig with a 12K gvw trailer and 1 ton is limited to my one ton's gcwr. (i think its like 17,500) Even if I were to hook onto a gooseneck trailer with a gvw of 24K I am still limited to my pickups GCVW of 17,500.
Now when you get into tractor trailers, this is not the case because they do NOT have GCWR's. This is something most DOT boys don't seem to grasp very well in DOT boy school. We have been round and round with these jerks and know of other large corporations in OK that have been also and this is the conclusion that has been made by the higher ups at DOT.
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  #59  
Old 02-22-2010, 12:00 AM
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dwc dwc is offline
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also I should mention if I were to cross state lines then all this changes. I think the limit there is 10K and above. Each state sets their own rules based from the federal mandates.
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  #60  
Old 02-22-2010, 08:44 AM
IN2MOWN IN2MOWN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Rose View Post
You must have a CDL to operate:
Any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight
rating (GVWR) of 26,001 pounds or more.
A trailer with a GVWR of more than 10,000 pounds
if the gross combination weight rating (GCWR) is
26,001 pounds or more.


It's worded poorly, in my opinion. See the bold line in the above quote from the page. To me it reads both ways, but I guess I'm reading it incorrectly.

Then WHY would people choose to have a 10,400 GCWR trailer scaled back to 9900? There would be no point unless you were just that close to being over with your truck/trailer combo.

The part you bolded is only 1/2 the sentence though...

On the next line it clearly states about the COMBINATION weight.
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