Register free!
Search
 
     

The Green Industry's Resource Center


Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-18-2010, 10:44 PM
Marinucci_Landscaping Marinucci_Landscaping is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Amherst, NY
Posts: 53
Looking for some advice with lawn repair and stone work

Hey all,

I'm currently working on an estimate for a job that involves repairing a lawn, and replacing some stone. I don't believe it is beyond my skill set (which is certainly limited compared to most of you), but this is all new territory for me. I'm looking for some advice with landscapers with a bit more experience for either or both parts of the job, and would be extremely grateful for any opinions you folks could offer.

I'll start with the lawn. The homeowner had a pipe burst in his beds, which had to have bobcats come in and tear up the place. I can handle fixing up the beds... but I'm struggling with repairing the lawn oddly enough; I haven't done much repair work to lawns, and am just looking for some advice here on how to repair the damage the bobcats caused by driving back and forth across it. The tread marks add up to about 390 sq.ft. in area and an inch to two inches deep in the worst places. To fix the lawn, this is what I'm thinking: renting a heavy duty tiller and tilling up the lawn to dig out the ruts; raking out the grass; maybe tamping it down; replacing any dips from the tilling/stamping process with topsoil; and finally reseeding. I can't help but ask, am I on the right track here? And if I am, how much topsoil would you order, considering 390 sq. ft. of repair work?

For the stone portion of the estimate, a decade ago the homeowner had his backyard paved over with decorative stone, which is about the size of quarters (as in, four quarters to a dollar). Over time, travel on the stone has compacted it down, and basically he just wants more stone added to even things out... nothing more. Simple enough. I did the measurements, it will need about 2.1 yards of stone. It's all grunt work here, just wheel-barreling stone to the back, dumping it, and leveling it out with some rakes. My question here, is how much do you folks charge to lay down stone, and level it out? I haven't done this before, and I really don't know what to charge here for labor.

Excuse the naivete, but this is new territory for me. Any help would be greatly appreciated, and I can link pictures if you all need. Thank you in advance.

- Marinucci
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-19-2010, 07:17 PM
Southern Elegance Southern Elegance is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Tullahoma TN
Posts: 241
cost of stone plus 100.00 per ton labor. maybe alittle more for a job that small
__________________
Southern Elegance Lawn Service
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-19-2010, 07:58 PM
Marinucci_Landscaping Marinucci_Landscaping is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Amherst, NY
Posts: 53
That's kinda what I had figured. Thank you. Any advice on how to fix up the lawn? Am I on the right track here?

- Marinucci
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-20-2010, 07:10 AM
GrassStitcher GrassStitcher is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Lebanon, Ct
Posts: 124
You are on track with the seeding, but I think it could be a bit overkill with the tiller. I would just top dress the area with topsoil and seed.

To calculate the topsoil just multiple sq ft x depth and divide by 27 (cu ft in a cu yard) I always over shoot to blend in around and compensate for compaction. So I would assume 500 ft sq, and maybe 5'' depth = .42 ft sq, 500 x .42 / 27 = 7.7 yards of topsoil so I would go with 6-8 yards topsoil, seed, and spread mulch like straw or penn mulch, low nitrogen fert and keep moist, water 1-2 times per day until it germinates.

You might get bare spots and the summer may beat up on the new lawn, and weeds will more than likely consume the area, make sure you tell the customer to expect that.

You will need to come back in the fall to repair. Make sure before you repair you zap the broad leaf weeds then take the Grass Stitcher (www.grassstitcher) and perforate through the crabgrass and any bare areas and patch up. All you need is seed and the Grass Stitcher, stitch right through dead grass and leave it.

I strongly suggest you explain all this to the customer because when they see the lawn in July (weeds and bare spots) they will surely blame you.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-21-2010, 08:18 AM
Marinucci_Landscaping Marinucci_Landscaping is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Amherst, NY
Posts: 53
Interesting. My only concern is that some of these ruts are pretty deep, and very compacted down. I'd like to see if I could just take them out, and I'm not sure that simply packing them down with more soil will do the trick. I'm afraid that compared to the rest of the lawn, it will just wash away over time, even if tamped/compacted, and return the rut.

I do use just about the same formula for replacing grass however. I typically cover with peat moss, and have the customer water at least once a day until the grass gets to be an inch or so high. Nevertheless, thank you Stitcher!

What does everyone else think?

- Marinucci
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-22-2010, 07:57 AM
Marinucci_Landscaping Marinucci_Landscaping is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Amherst, NY
Posts: 53
Any more advice for the lawn would be appreciated.

- Marinucci
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-24-2010, 09:35 AM
Marinucci_Landscaping Marinucci_Landscaping is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Amherst, NY
Posts: 53
One last bump out of desperation here... trying to cap off this estimate and am not sure about my technique to fix the lawn.

- Marinucci
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-24-2010, 09:46 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,333
I think you are on the right track with the tilling. Your primary problem here is compaction. This cannot be alleviated by simply filling in the ruts.

Personally I would soil test, add/fix any drainage/irrigation that may be needed/missing, add any amendments you need per soil test results (which will most likely include a generous amount of compost), then till it all in as deep as possible, grade, settle (various ways to do this), adjust grade if necessary, seed, compost top dress.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-25-2010, 01:04 AM
Marinucci_Landscaping Marinucci_Landscaping is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Amherst, NY
Posts: 53
Hey Kiril,

Good to hear I'm on the right track, but I'm not quite following your post. Would you mind elaborating a bit on the problem of compaction?

Please excuse the ignorance, but I'm a little lost: why the soil test and what do you mean by adding amendments; what does drainage have to do with the equation;, and why add compost to the mix of topsoil? Please note, I'm not questioning your methods, not in the least bit... this is new to me, and I simply don't understand your techniques. Like I had said, this is all new territory for me and I am not nearly as experienced as someone as yourself. Nevertheless, thank you.

- Marinucci
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-25-2010, 01:55 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marinucci_Landscaping View Post
Hey Kiril,

Good to hear I'm on the right track, but I'm not quite following your post. Would you mind elaborating a bit on the problem of compaction?

Please excuse the ignorance, but I'm a little lost: why the soil test and what do you mean by adding amendments; what does drainage have to do with the equation;, and why add compost to the mix of topsoil? Please note, I'm not questioning your methods, not in the least bit... this is new to me, and I simply don't understand your techniques. Like I had said, this is all new territory for me and I am not nearly as experienced as someone as yourself. Nevertheless, thank you.

- Marinucci
A soil test will tell you what the current status of your soil is, and what amendments you may need. More likely than not, your soil will be low in organic matter, hence the compost. Work to build the soil you have ... you will not solve anything by bringing in top soil and laying it on top of what you have especially if it is compacted. There are good reasons for bringing in top soil ... but IMO this is not one. Beyond that, increasing your soils organic matter content will provide numerous other benefits.

The only reason I mentioned drainage and irrigation is because if you need it, then this is the time to do it, assuming you are going to be tilling the entire yard.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:51 AM.

Page generated in 0.10709 seconds with 7 queries