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  #61  
Old 05-12-2010, 09:07 PM
pitrack pitrack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerfectEarth View Post
ewww, sucks for him. I got what I needed but looking back, probably wouldn't do it again.

Hostas are quite functional for coverage and texture...BUT, no other perennial covers so much in summer and so little in winter! Gotta remember those bare spots in the off-season when using them.
I love Hostas, but they don't do the best in full sun. You guys have the same experience? Do certain types do better than others in the sun?
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  #62  
Old 05-12-2010, 09:18 PM
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I love Hostas, but they don't do the best in full sun. You guys have the same experience? Do certain types do better than others in the sun?
Your best type for more sun is going to be a varigated hosta... The "blue" hostas definitely prefer lots of shade. "Green" leaf hostas can do ok in a mix situation... But for sun, for sure a common variety like a 'francee' or a 'patriot' variety. The leaves will suffer a bit under really hot sun but it's just a visual thing.
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  #63  
Old 05-12-2010, 10:04 PM
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There's a reason there's "perfect" in your company name.
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Pittsburgh/Western PA Landscapers Networking Thread

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  #64  
Old 05-12-2010, 11:38 PM
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Kennedy Landscaping Kennedy Landscaping is offline
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That mulch job looks immaculate. Those shrubs are perfectly shaped.
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  #65  
Old 05-12-2010, 11:47 PM
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where did you get all your plant knowledge?
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  #66  
Old 05-13-2010, 12:43 AM
pitrack pitrack is offline
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Originally Posted by PerfectEarth View Post
Your best type for more sun is going to be a varigated hosta... The "blue" hostas definitely prefer lots of shade. "Green" leaf hostas can do ok in a mix situation... But for sun, for sure a common variety like a 'francee' or a 'patriot' variety. The leaves will suffer a bit under really hot sun but it's just a visual thing.
Ah, you know I was actually thinking it seemed like I see more of those in the sun than the others. Thanks for the info.

Another question. I'm interested in that Echo bed redefiner you have. Would you think if you were making a new bed, did a rough edge with a spade, then went over it with the edger, would it look real crisp? (Almost like you used an actual bed edger to begin with?)

Also, how are you getting some of those mulch beds so clean and smooth? Do you use any type of tiller or anything?
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  #67  
Old 05-13-2010, 07:08 AM
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PerfectEarth PerfectEarth is offline
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Thanks for all the compliments! I really appreciate them!

Quote:
Originally Posted by DenbowLawn View Post
where did you get all your plant knowledge?
Again, I'm not my any means 100% on my plant know-how! But it is all from my estate job (from 1999-2009)...my boss is/was extremely knowledgeable in the horticulture field so it was an ideal on-the-job classroom. It was landscape maintenance at the highest level, and I don't say that to sound pompous or anything- it just was very large and very detailed work. Kinda fit me and how I'm "anal" about things.

I WISH I could post some pics from my 10 years there.... I have thousands of incredible project pics and plant shots but they are for my eyes only, unfortunately....

Quote:
Originally Posted by pitrack View Post
Ah, you know I was actually thinking it seemed like I see more of those in the sun than the others. Thanks for the info.

Another question. I'm interested in that Echo bed redefiner you have. Would you think if you were making a new bed, did a rough edge with a spade, then went over it with the edger, would it look real crisp? (Almost like you used an actual bed edger to begin with?)

Also, how are you getting some of those mulch beds so clean and smooth? Do you use any type of tiller or anything?
I suppose you could use the edger in that application, but on a new bed construction, I'd probably leave it at the shop... You're already doing soil work, grading, defining an edge, etc... The Redefiner worked best when there is already something there. the "width" of it's effectiveness is only about 3 inches- and that is slightly sloped up towards the bed. I'd use a spade only for a new bed

And the mulch....well, I'm just really picky about it being level and consistently deep. On a hand-spread job like that one I just posted, it's just fast flicks with your hand once it's sorta level and at the right depth. And you can always flip a leaf rake over and lightly smooth it out. I do that a lot! No power equipment on a mulch laying job!

Oh and the other thing- I watched a company last week much right over a ton of leaves and sticks, all kinds of debris in the beds. That gets on my nerves!!! And it looked HORRIBLE. Crap poking thru....not level, just throwing it in the beds. I always rake out or blow out anything major prior to mulching.

I see hardwood (even bagged Cedar and Cyprus too) jobs that if I were the customer, I'd freak out on the company. Guys leave their work so sloppy- HUGE piles all up in shrubs, nothing smoothed out, just tosses in and barely leveled. 1 inch her and 6 over there. Bad work is obvious and lots of guys are doing it. You don't worry about those guys tho!
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  #68  
Old 05-13-2010, 09:14 AM
pitrack pitrack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerfectEarth View Post
Thanks for all the compliments! I really appreciate them!



Again, I'm not my any means 100% on my plant know-how! But it is all from my estate job (from 1999-2009)...my boss is/was extremely knowledgeable in the horticulture field so it was an ideal on-the-job classroom. It was landscape maintenance at the highest level, and I don't say that to sound pompous or anything- it just was very large and very detailed work. Kinda fit me and how I'm "anal" about things.

I WISH I could post some pics from my 10 years there.... I have thousands of incredible project pics and plant shots but they are for my eyes only, unfortunately....



I suppose you could use the edger in that application, but on a new bed construction, I'd probably leave it at the shop... You're already doing soil work, grading, defining an edge, etc... The Redefiner worked best when there is already something there. the "width" of it's effectiveness is only about 3 inches- and that is slightly sloped up towards the bed. I'd use a spade only for a new bed

And the mulch....well, I'm just really picky about it being level and consistently deep. On a hand-spread job like that one I just posted, it's just fast flicks with your hand once it's sorta level and at the right depth. And you can always flip a leaf rake over and lightly smooth it out. I do that a lot! No power equipment on a mulch laying job!

Oh and the other thing- I watched a company last week much right over a ton of leaves and sticks, all kinds of debris in the beds. That gets on my nerves!!! And it looked HORRIBLE. Crap poking thru....not level, just throwing it in the beds. I always rake out or blow out anything major prior to mulching.

I see hardwood (even bagged Cedar and Cyprus too) jobs that if I were the customer, I'd freak out on the company. Guys leave their work so sloppy- HUGE piles all up in shrubs, nothing smoothed out, just tosses in and barely leveled. 1 inch her and 6 over there. Bad work is obvious and lots of guys are doing it. You don't worry about those guys tho!
Haha I know what you mean man.

Thanks for the reply
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  #69  
Old 05-13-2010, 12:53 PM
eatonpcat eatonpcat is offline
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Thanks Perfect Earth... Now I won't be able to look at lawnsite while my wife is in the room. If she see's these pictures I'm a dead man!! She will want her yard to look like that!

Amazing work my friend, Keep the pictures coming.
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  #70  
Old 05-18-2010, 09:46 PM
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PerfectEarth PerfectEarth is offline
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I've been doing flowers the past few days- These jobs get on the list and are hard to fit in, so a rainy day or a wet day is the perfect time to do them, and we've had plenty of those lately! Seemed like it misted all day.

Just a couple annual beds I do and a new planter job I picked up. Think I finally got the Petunia bed amended perfectly after a couple years of switching it out twice a year (Summer/Fall) .... and feel free to rag on the 'Purple Wave' Petunia...not my first choice but they are cheap and HARDY- there is no irrigation in that bed. Much prefer the look of the tiny New Guinea Impatient bed with Caladiums.

Really starting to enjoy planter jobs a bit more- they break up the monotony of hard labor and I like the creative aspect of anything. And they can be decently profitable!

Need it to dry out badly so I can start on many install jobs that I have sold.... got customers tapping their feet. April was bone dry and May is soaking.
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