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  #1  
Old 06-16-2010, 08:16 PM
macgyver_GA macgyver_GA is offline
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Bermuda disease, North GA

Can someone help me identify what this disease is. I take care of my elderly next door neighbors' lawn. It started last year along the patio and has spread this year and is starting to creep further out especially around the downspout. I dug a few test patches out to check for any insects/grubs and didn't find any so that leads me to believe its some sort of fungus. The rest of the lawn seems to be healthy and the bermuda has been thriving everywhere now that our nighttime temps are staying around 70ish.

The lawn was fertilized at the First of May with Lesco 24-2-11 and is due for another application in the next two weeks. I'm in North GA so the soil is obviously red clay. No irrigation system so the only irrigation it gets is the afternoon thunderstorms we've been having lately. The weather has been really funky here in the last year so I'm sure that has added to it.
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  #2  
Old 06-16-2010, 08:54 PM
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ted putnam ted putnam is offline
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Bermudas for the most part are resistant to disease unless there is poor fertility or environmental conditions beyond your control. That being said the afternoon T-showers are not helping fungus sitiuations. Almost all of my lawns have Dollar Spot fungus to some degree. You can apply fungicide and hope weather conditions change or you can hit it with fertilizer and try to get it to grow out of it. This is usually the approach I take to Dollar Spot in Bermuda because the alternative is expensive and usually only a temporary "fix"(and I have so many lawns that I care for). The pics are not that clear but If I were betting, I would say it is Dollar Spot.
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Old 06-16-2010, 08:59 PM
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WestGaPineStraw WestGaPineStraw is offline
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looks like dollar spot to me..hit it with some Eagle and it will help it. Takes atleast 2 weeks to see results.
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Old 06-17-2010, 07:05 AM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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Does water stand in the areas affected?
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Old 06-17-2010, 08:46 AM
macgyver_GA macgyver_GA is offline
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Nope water doesn't stand there. You can't really tell from the picture but there is a decent fall to the grade to move the water. I will say that water probably has something to do with it since it first formed along the patio, then around the downspout. Obviously there will be runoff in those areas when it rains. Maybe the nitrogen is getting washed out of the soil in those areas a lot faster than the surrounding turf.
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Old 06-17-2010, 12:04 PM
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WestGaPineStraw WestGaPineStraw is offline
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Soil Test will determine what's wrong. Ph may be too low and the Bermuda will no take up the nutrients in the soil.
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Old 06-17-2010, 09:05 PM
VLTS VLTS is offline
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See if this helps

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubs/PDF/C891.pdf

Here's the quick guide to turfgrass diseases. There is also a longer, more in depth version of this publication that UGA moved around somewhere that i can not find for you quickly. You might want to try and do a search for it.
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Old 06-17-2010, 10:45 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is offline
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She used salt for ice on the patio. And then used salt on her roof to get rid of those 4 inch deep ice dams. It ran down the downspout. Hmmm...wait you are in Georgia? Perhaps a little alkalinity from the cement and the roof shingles?

Or 3) something draining out of that red bark mulch.

Or 4)--just dry grass. Shady area protected from the sun is doine fine. Do you see the green area along the concrete to the back right on the second picture? Is this where the water run-off is concentrated? What then?

Check for dry soil with the screwdriver test. Insert screwdriver (Phillips or plain), if it goes in 4 inches=too wet, 3 inches= nicely moist, 2 inches=adequate, 1 inch or less=too dry.
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Old 06-18-2010, 10:04 AM
macgyver_GA macgyver_GA is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
She used salt for ice on the patio. And then used salt on her roof to get rid of those 4 inch deep ice dams. It ran down the downspout. Hmmm...wait you are in Georgia? Perhaps a little alkalinity from the cement and the roof shingles?

Or 3) something draining out of that red bark mulch.

Or 4)--just dry grass. Shady area protected from the sun is doine fine. Do you see the green area along the concrete to the back right on the second picture? Is this where the water run-off is concentrated? What then?

Check for dry soil with the screwdriver test. Insert screwdriver (Phillips or plain), if it goes in 4 inches=too wet, 3 inches= nicely moist, 2 inches=adequate, 1 inch or less=too dry.
Haha yeah you're right, no salt here in GA.

Thats an interesting idea about the alkalinity...never thought about that.

Thats actually pine straw. So I don't think anything is running out of that.

Could be dry soil, I will do that screwdriver test. it is in direct sun for almost the entire day (south facing) However, my backyard is lush, thick, and green and sits in the sun all day too. Both my yard and theirs get the same amount of fert on the same schedule since I do them both. The area of the diseased turf is definitely where the water concentrates from the downspouts. It gets the runoff from both my downspout and their downspout and it runs off to the back of the lot (towards the back of the picture). Whenever I get some time I'm going to pipe those downspouts off the back of the lot.

I'm gonna get a soil test run, I heard that John Deere Landscapes runs soil tests and I have one about 2 miles up the road from my house so I will check with them to see if they do them at their location. If not I will take it to the county extension office.
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Old 06-18-2010, 03:20 PM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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Most of the tests are not done on location so regardless if it JDL or extension office it will have to be sent out and will take about 1 week for results.
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