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  #31  
Old 08-13-2010, 12:46 PM
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minix minix is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
Stressed, weak plants are more vulnerable to attack/disease.
What stress out ground cover? It may be a dumb question but I have to ask. Some of the ground cover dosent even get prunned and its still looking bad and its been there for years.
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  #32  
Old 08-13-2010, 12:51 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by minix View Post
What stress out ground cover? It may be a dumb question but I have to ask. Some of the ground cover dosent even get prunned and its still looking bad and its been there for years.
There are general factors that all plants are susceptible to (water, competition, nutrients, soil structure, etc...), then there are genus/species specific issues. What type of ground cover and do you have pics of it?
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  #33  
Old 08-13-2010, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Stressed, weak plants are more vulnerable to attack/disease.
That's the smartest post in this thread....
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  #34  
Old 08-13-2010, 10:30 PM
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Are we going to stagger into the reasons of insect attack is attributed to stress hormones sent out by trees, plants, and grasses during periods of stress.???? Is it natural selection that one tree is singled out over a grove of thousands or maybe one particular tree in a city block?? The darn insect is hungry and your tree was in their path to the food bar. Japanese beetles are and were bad this season. They completely devoured my neighbors fruit trees, ornamental pears, maples, and apples.
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  #35  
Old 08-29-2010, 11:17 PM
Kinz Kinz is offline
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It looks like a Norway Maple tree. Spray the tree with Malathion after you pick off as many of the bags as you can reach and burn them. But spraing them will do the same thing. It will kill the insect inside.
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  #36  
Old 08-29-2010, 11:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kinz View Post
It looks like a Norway Maple tree. Spray the tree with Malathion after you pick off as many of the bags as you can reach and burn them. But spraing them will do the same thing. It will kill the insect inside.
Be careful giving advice out of your geographic area. Here in Northern Ohio, the bagworms have finished eating, have thick bags, and have tied themselves on for the winter. Anything sprayed on the tree will be wasted. And I know of no chemical which will penetrate the bags now.

(Note: it has never been confirmed on this thread that the damage was in fact from bagworms.)
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  #37  
Old 08-30-2010, 08:31 AM
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It's also strange that this bagworm is in that tree. Bagworms are usually in evergreens like Leyland Cypress and other plants like that. Sometimes a few might come over to another plant, but not in great numbers. And yes, I guess I should have clarified that the bags need to have the caterpillar inside in order for it to be killed. Spraying an empty bag doesn't dooo much good. Bacillus thuringiensis is a good natural insecticide and Orthene is a good chemical control.
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  #38  
Old 08-30-2010, 08:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kinz View Post
It's also strange that this bagworm is in that tree. Bagworms are usually in evergreens like Leyland Cypress and other plants like that. Sometimes a few might come over to another plant, but not in great numbers. And yes, I guess I should have clarified that the bags need to have the caterpillar inside in order for it to be killed. Spraying an empty bag doesn't dooo much good. Bacillus thuringiensis is a good natural insecticide and Orthene is a good chemical control.
Yes, Kinz, you are right, I suggested that bagworms are not usually found in damaging numbers in the deciduous trees we have here. The preferred homes here are arborvitae, junipers, and some spruces. And not to belabor the point, but those leaves showed damage (e.g. holes in middle) that didn't look like they came from bagworms. I would differ with you on the one point. I have not seen an insecticide that will penetrate aged bags of the current year.
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  #39  
Old 08-30-2010, 09:02 AM
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yeah, you're probably right. I guess catch'em early is the best thing.
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  #40  
Old 08-30-2010, 12:35 PM
bdoeden bdoeden is offline
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As others have said those are bagworms. I've only seen them on evergreens in our area.
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