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  #11  
Old 08-27-2010, 08:15 PM
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GreenT GreenT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dKoester View Post
Two tablespoons of baking soda per gallon of water will halt it in its tracks and any other fungus that tries to bother the lawn.

Good tip dK. I've heard of it before, although I've yet to try it.

.
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  #12  
Old 08-28-2010, 01:44 PM
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Buck_wheat Buck_wheat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenT View Post
I'm in Zone 9 as well. Looking forward to see how it does next winter.

Two of the selling features of Captiva is its reduced need for watering and resistance to Cinch bugs. Here's a little video with more info.

I paid $105/pallet btw.

.
Thanks for the info... the price premium may be worth it if it reduces the # of cuts, overall maintenance & pestice applications.

I'll need to get a better understanding of the premium recovery period... eg. how long will it take for the savings in maintenance to recover the 20% + premium over what I'm paying now.

I'm excited about this new strain and appreciate you bringing it to us. I'll be watching for a while.
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  #13  
Old 09-10-2010, 04:21 AM
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Keith Keith is offline
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I've had it in my front yard since July 1st. It started off great, but I have a large hedge that cuts down on air movement a bit. It's been terribly hot and humid here, and it did develop fungus. Though I am not sure it's not cercospora leaf spot rather than gray leaf spot. I do have some thinner areas in the shade from that, and mainly from webworms that I didn't treat for right away. I fertilized it with 8-0-16 around the second week of August.

I cut it for the first time at 4 weeks. And I've cut it a total of 4 times since it was put in. While it can be cut every two weeks, and still not be as tall as Floratam in 5 days, it's probably better cut at about 10 or 11 days.

Once rooted (which was no time at all) it seemed to hold up to heat about as good as any St. Augustine that I have used. In fact, we had enough rain that I did not water it but once in the first 16 days it was in.

I wanted to try it ever since I first heard about it. I finally found some and had to pay pretty big premium for it. I will not install it anywhere else until I see what it does. I made that mistake with Palmetto about eight years ago.
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  #14  
Old 09-10-2010, 04:42 PM
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GreenT GreenT is offline
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.

Thanks for the info Keith. Keep us posted.

My test property is bouncing back from the gray leaf now that the rains have subsided. I did noticed some thinning in the shady spots (when first laid down those were the areas it looked the best) so now I'm curious to see how it will do in the future.

You're right, best cutting schedule would probably be every 10-12 days, although that's not my schedule.

.
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  #15  
Old 10-23-2010, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by GreenT View Post
My test property is bouncing back from the gray leaf now that the rains have subsided.

Update:

Since the above post we've had almost no rain. The Captiva has recovered from what turned out to be a heavy fungus infestation. It started with gray leaf and then cercospora leaf spot took over (you were right Keith ).

Now that it has been completely dry for about a month, it is doing great. This grass really doesn't like too much water/humidity. While Floratan is struggling on minimal watering (as regulated), the Captiva is thriving.

Lesson learned. Will recommend to homeowners to shut down their irrigation system during next's year rainy season. Much water savings....

.
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  #16  
Old 10-23-2010, 10:40 PM
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Same thing. No rain in about a month. I'm watering mine once a week now, or about .5 to .6" a week. It shows signs of stress only on the 7th day. After a watering, it recovers almost instantly. Just speculating, but I would imagine nitrogen needs will be much lower than other varieties as well.

As with yours, all the fungal problems are pretty much gone. I never treated it with a fungicide. I wanted it to survive on its own. I should mention, many other semi-dwarf varieties also seemed to have more fungal problems than usual this year.

This is a true slow-growing variety. I've probably mowed it six or seven times since I installed it (July 1st.) The total amount of clippings in nearly four months would be roughly equivalent to one week of Floratam clippings in the summer! No joke. If you think zoysia needs very little, you haven't seen anything. I've edged it once, only because it had four or five runners that had grown a inch or so over the driveway. I don't have any idea how they get it to grow at the sod farms, it just doesn't move. I had a couple of weak pieces that mostly died when I first put it in. I don't think the runners will ever fill it in. I can't imagine plugs will ever be available.
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  #17  
Old 10-24-2010, 10:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
I don't have any idea how they get it to grow at the sod farms, it just doesn't move.

The same thought cross my mind. I would guess it takes five times as long as Floratan to grow so.... will prices go up in the future if it catches on and more acreage is needed? Time will tell, I guess.

Btw Keith, I talked to my guy last week and forgot to ask him about the info you wanted. I haven't forgotten though. well I did, so I'll ask him next time.

.
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  #18  
Old 10-24-2010, 11:22 PM
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The people I have talked to don't have Captiva available at all now. Most have said they don't expect it until next summer.

I started to put a couple of pallets of Sapphire in the back yard. It seems to be the exact opposite of Captiva. Supposedly has vicious growth. I was afraid it would wrap around the house and overrun the Captiva
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  #19  
Old 11-10-2010, 03:59 PM
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Patriot Services Patriot Services is offline
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How is it turning out. I am looking for options to give customers besides floratam.
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  #20  
Old 11-11-2010, 12:55 AM
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Keith Keith is offline
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Mine looks really good right now. Like most semi-dwarf varieties, it likes the cooler, dry weather better than the heat and humidity. Bottom line, I like it in my yard. But, at this time I wouldn't put it in a customer's yard. I think it has enough quirks to keep it from being widely used. If it didn't have the quirks, those in the lawn cutting business would be in big trouble. I really mean that. The stuff just does not grow.

As far as an option to Floratam, I always hope to find one, but end up going back to it. Despite it's flaws, it's durable. It can recover from heat stress and drought better than any other I have used. It can grow out of most fungus problems. And, even though chinch bugs do a number on it, I've never seen anyone lose more than 15-20% of there lawn in a year, even if it was never treated. I can't say that for any other variety that we have.

When I need a different variety for shade, or whatever reason, I usually go with Seville. It's pretty easy to get. It grows slower than Floratam. And has a finer blade. But it can get spongey.
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