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Old 05-07-2011, 12:11 AM
MrUPS MrUPS is offline
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Location: New Hampshire
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Need some help and advice please

I live in southwest NH.. We just finished a total renovation of our back yard.. and we want to seed this spring.. We have our own well, and it is in bad shape. So i cant water the new seed very much. What should i do? How do i keep it moist? The contractors left me hay to cover it with.. should i use that to try to keep in more moist? Top dress with compost??? Please Help..I don't want to waste the seed they put down. They spread loam over the whole backyard and seeded and threw in start fert. The seed is a mix from scotts of fescue's and KB... The area will see a mix of sun and shade..a little more on the sunny side!
Thanks so much for any help!
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Old 05-07-2011, 03:41 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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Water is best. Straw covering will be a help. Seed in fall for less weed and crabgrass problems. You will probably need weed control about 8 weeks after seeding. Kill weeds again in fall and follow up with seed in case there are thin spots.
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Old 05-07-2011, 03:54 PM
mdlwn1 mdlwn1 is offline
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Without water, be careful trying to do to much untill the fall. No one can tell you exactly what to do without being there. If it's only KB and Fescue's...it will take time..they germinate slowly (up to 3 weeks in some cases) and are slow to establish thereafter. It might be a good idea to actually allow the weeds to establish as well as they will help condition the soil to some extent and hold moisture in the ground more so than bare dirt. If you have great soil and some ability to keep things moist via hoses or light rain..that would change everything. Watering seed is pretty intensive..you dont need a lot of water just a few minutes per area..but you do have to keep moving the sprinkler. In bad, hard, sloped soils this can be a lot of labor. In good soil you could get away with once a week sometimes. If you do go for it..just remember go for green first, whether they're weeds or grass isnt important yet. Understand that complete success growing a spring lawn and then killing weeds is a bit of an art..so don't get discouraged if it doesn't work out the best.
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Old 05-07-2011, 04:35 PM
MrUPS MrUPS is offline
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thanks guys!! I am trying to get some water to all areas.. but it isally hard cause the pressure is so bad here that the sprinklers only work for 2.or 3 mins...
What are your thoughts on covering the seed with hay.. or top dressing with compost or both.
Also i am hurting it by walking on it to water.. and moving the hose's over it all the time?
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Old 05-07-2011, 04:46 PM
mdlwn1 mdlwn1 is offline
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Almost anything you put on top to hold moisture in will be a benefit EXCEPT compost. Compost comes in all variations and a lot of the time it's too "hot" for seeds of any kind. Generally speaking, compost is something you apply well before germination or well after. Hay works great.....if you can make it stay there...if you have the hay and the time...do it. Walk wherever you want untill germination occurs. At that point start picking and chosing your battles. If you have the budget, lay out multiple hoses with a 4 way shut off valve at the source to reduce traffic. Yeah, it doesn't take much to hurt those little seeds....
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Old 05-08-2011, 08:23 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdlwn1 View Post
Almost anything you put on top to hold moisture in will be a benefit EXCEPT compost. Compost comes in all variations and a lot of the time it's too "hot" for seeds of any kind. Generally speaking, compost is something you apply well before germination or well after. Hay works great.....if you can make it stay there...if you have the hay and the time...do it. Walk wherever you want untill germination occurs. At that point start picking and chosing your battles. If you have the budget, lay out multiple hoses with a 4 way shut off valve at the source to reduce traffic. Yeah, it doesn't take much to hurt those little seeds....
Compost doesn't get too hot, rooting OM does though.

Don't call it compost and don't use it for anything if it isn't finished...

A good layer of compost, will actually keep the soil underneath moister longer and allow the seedlings to pop through at the same time.

Straw is always a mess leaving lots of dead zones for weeds to develop...

Anyways, put down the seed and cover with straw and let the Spring rains help... Then in the fall do it again.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 05-08-2011, 06:37 PM
mdlwn1 mdlwn1 is offline
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Smallaxe...I didn't mean hot as in temperature...more like how a pepper is hot.
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Old 05-09-2011, 09:25 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Compost is as benign as water, once it is actually compost... It is the decaying process that causes it to be hot like a pepper in the soil or on the surface...

I once planted a whole row of strawberries in what I thought must be good compost, and eveyone of them died in their sleep... However, in real compost you can fill a pot with nothing but compost, and place the tenderest plant in there to grow and i will be fine...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #9  
Old 05-09-2011, 12:07 PM
mdlwn1 mdlwn1 is offline
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I don't think I've ever seen or heard of the gold you speak of.....
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  #10  
Old 05-09-2011, 01:11 PM
MrUPS MrUPS is offline
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How do I tell weather it is good compost or bad? I got a yard of it from our local garden shop.. 45 a yard!!
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