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  #1  
Old 09-09-2010, 04:54 PM
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phasthound phasthound is offline
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Humus and Soil Fertility

Here is an interesting article from Tree Care Industry Magazine written by Kevin Smith. While it specifically pertains to trees, it is important to understand all you can about how everything is connected to everything else.
http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/...c#/6aa0b8ac/28
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Old 09-09-2010, 05:44 PM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
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I love Kevin Smith he is the bomb, well how about I like him a lot
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Old 09-10-2010, 08:54 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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I could read the first page only, but I am glad that the idea of humus is still written about. Colloidial elements of OM that carry positively charged ions, for accessability to the plants, is the one thing we tend to overlook when dumping ferts and water on the lawns.

No wonder so many lawns are nothing more, than hydroponically maintained puddles of chemical soup, sitting atop layers, of disease ridden thatch.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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Old 09-10-2010, 09:05 AM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
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there are arrows on the side of the page to move forward or backward

it wasn't clear but I know Kevin and if you read between the lines he is suggesting that replicating the natural process for trees is best, trees have a hard time figuring out how to handle a 10-10-10 fertilizer
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
No wonder so many lawns are nothing more, than hydroponically maintained puddles of chemical soup, sitting atop layers, of disease ridden thatch.
Although the punctuation is not right, that is a wonderful word-picture.
Do you have experience in writing?
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Old 09-12-2010, 10:25 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtandhoops View Post
Although the punctuation is not right, that is a wonderful word-picture.
Do you have experience in writing?
To me puncuation in the form of commas, is(are) subjective. I figure as long as I brake the sentence somewhere, near the correct; position to promote timing and give, pause in the mind of the reader it may, be understandable.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 09-12-2010, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
To me puncuation in the form of commas, is(are) subjective. I figure as long as I brake the sentence somewhere, near the correct; position to promote timing and give, pause in the mind of the reader it may, be understandable.
And may I add that you are witty, too. (or at least half-way there)
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Old 09-13-2010, 08:08 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Originally Posted by dirtandhoops View Post
And may I add that you are witty, too. (or at least half-way there)
I'm not clever enough to be a total wit. Half wit is better than, no wit at all. A code I live by.

I do like what the article was pointing to btw. I'm glad that someone is saying that there are better things for trees, than synferts.
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 09-13-2010, 09:17 AM
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I hope our banter didn't get this thread off track.

I agree there are better ways to assist trees than the synthetics but tell that to those like TGCL.
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Old 09-13-2010, 10:38 AM
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I think I posted this before.

Fertilizer and Consequences for Trees
Joseph Heckman, Ph.D., Specialist in Soil Fertility
Conventional thinking assumes that fertilization of trees
increases their ability to ward off insects, disease, and stress,
but research by Dr. Daniel Herms at The Ohio State University,
suggests otherwise.
http://www.ohio4h.org/~news/story.php?id=2442
The nutritional quality (protein content) of host plants is usually a
limiting factor in the growth and survival of insects. Fertilization increases
the nutritional value of the tree as food for insects. For example,
on fertilized trees, gypsy moth larvae have been observed to grow
49% faster and eastern tent caterpillar 530% faster.
There is a trade-off between tree growth rate and defense against
pest attack. While fertilization does increase the growth and may enhance
aesthetic quality of trees, scientific evidence shows that fertilization
almost always decreases tree resistance. In addition to enhancing
the nutritional quality of the plant to the feeding insects, fertilization
decreases the concentrations of plant defensive compounds. Alkaloids
(nicotine), terpenes, phenols (flavonoids, lignin, tannins), and cyanide
are examples of defensive chemicals that become less concentrated in
plant tissue when trees are given fertilizer.
Tree fertilization also increases the shoot/root ratio. Increasing
shoot growth while decreasing the proportion of root growth, adds to
the trees water requirement while reducing tree capacity to acquire water.
Consequently, fertilized trees may be more susceptible to drought.
Nevertheless, fertilization may have a role in a plant health care
program, especially in high maintenance landscapes. Caretakers, however,
should be aware of potential consequences of fertilizer on pest
resistance and stress tolerance in trees.
Urban landscapes are often plagued with soil compaction. Besides
fertilization, efforts to improve tree health should focus on preventing
soil compaction or remediating soils that are already compacted.
o
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The nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.
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