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  #21  
Old 10-20-2010, 11:13 AM
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regularguy regularguy is offline
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Jess is the ugliest darn "her" I ever saw!

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  #22  
Old 10-20-2010, 11:16 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by FIMCO-MEISTER View Post
Then what installation methods do you believe exist to minimize the final 20% closing shock or do you believe any exist?
Why would you need to do anything special at this point? The potential for really destructive water hammer has already been eliminated by the 80% reduction. The rest of the system is built to withstand the remaining hammer potential.

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Can an irrigation system designed to not exceed 5fps because of installation methods create a situation in which it would exceed 5fps on opening?
Yes .... and what does this have to do with a closing solenoid valve? Your copy and paste doesn't address valve opening ..... and why is that? Because in dinky pipe systems, probably 99% of water hammer problems are caused by closing valves.
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  #23  
Old 10-20-2010, 11:18 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Jess is the ugliest darn "her" I ever saw!
Yup .... you are correct .... my bad. I saw a pic of his wife on the irrigation site years ago and assumed it was Jess.
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  #24  
Old 10-20-2010, 12:16 PM
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FIMCO-MEISTER FIMCO-MEISTER is offline
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Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
Why would you need to do anything special at this point? The potential for really destructive water hammer has already been eliminated by the 80% reduction. The rest of the system is built to withstand the remaining hammer potential.

Assuming one has used one of your $500 valves. Lets stick to the real world equipment.

Yes .... and what does this have to do with a closing solenoid valve? Your copy and paste doesn't address valve opening ..... and why is that? Because in dinky pipe systems, probably 99% of water hammer problems are caused by closing valves.
Problems can occur on either opening or closing. Best just to do whatever you can to keep air out of the lines and make sure air doesn't get on the lateral side of the valve by making the valve the high point in the zone.
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  #25  
Old 10-20-2010, 12:46 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by FIMCO-MEISTER View Post
Assuming one has used one of your $500 valves. Lets stick to the real world equipment.
My cost for a griswold brass valves are DWS75 = $73, DWS100 = $82, DWS125 = $99, DWS150 = $124, DWS200 = $144

Why exactly are you pulling B.S. prices out of your ass Pete?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FIMCO-MEISTER View Post
Problems can occur on either opening or closing. Best just to do whatever you can to keep air out of the lines and make sure air doesn't get on the lateral side of the valve by making the valve the high point in the zone.
First you say low point ..... now high point .... I can't keep track.

So the question remains .... what exactly did you do to keep air out of the lines before sprinklers with check valves became available?

How do you handle low volume irrigation when not using a product like Netafim Techline CV?

Last edited by Kiril; 10-20-2010 at 12:50 PM.
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  #26  
Old 10-20-2010, 12:53 PM
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FIMCO-MEISTER FIMCO-MEISTER is offline
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I already told you go back and read. It is better to have the air collect at a high point near a head than at the valve. If air is the first thing flushed from the system that is ideal. If air is trapped behind water then not so ideal.
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  #27  
Old 10-20-2010, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
My cost for a griswold brass valves are DWS75 = $73, DWS100 = $82, DWS125 = $99, DWS150 = $124, DWS200 = $144........
DWS valves are for pikers. We want the 2000 series.
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  #28  
Old 10-20-2010, 01:01 PM
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FIMCO-MEISTER FIMCO-MEISTER is offline
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DWS valves are for pikers. We want the 2000 series.
Especially since the 2000 series is the one they push for water hammer issues.

Screw it. It's a beautiful day. The Rangers are up 3-1 Game starts at 2pm I'm heading out for exercise and fresh air.
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  #29  
Old 10-20-2010, 01:09 PM
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the Crankees will rise again!!
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  #30  
Old 10-20-2010, 01:11 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by FIMCO-MEISTER View Post
I already told you go back and read. It is better to have the air collect at a high point near a head than at the valve. If air is the first thing flushed from the system that is ideal. If air is trapped behind water then not so ideal.
You are avoiding the questions.

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Originally Posted by FIMCO-MEISTER View Post
Especially since the 2000 series is the one they push for water hammer issues.
Bullshit.

http://www.griswoldcontrols.com/IRRDW.htm

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For maximum performance at an economical price, no other remote-control irrigation valve can compare to the self cleaning Griswold DW Series valve. The DW Series valve is the sensible choice regardless of your water source. Even potable water will eventually clog the types of screens found in other "contamination proof" valves. This translates into more maintenance work and more long term cost. The unique Griswold Design allows the bronze-body DW Series valve to serve dependably under the most adverse conditions. Sludge, algae, silt, and other contaminants have no effect on the valve action. There are no filters or screens to clean, and no vulnerable exterior tubing to be damaged or deteriorate. The entire diaphragm-control mechanism is contained within the valve itself. Each time the valve opens or closes the pilot orifice is wiped clean. A tapered metering pin controls the opening and closing speed of the valve eliminating any possibility of water hammer or chattering.
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