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  #31  
Old 02-08-2011, 08:58 AM
Az Gardener Az Gardener is offline
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I respectfully disagree. Fertilizer applied now will take at least 30 days to get into the plant and become active depending on soil temperatures. If you are applying a high N product I agree you will be more likely to get that big push of fleshy growth that is more susceptible to pests. I am not suggesting a high N product.

My disclaimer is if you are doing foilar applications and you have some green tissue left or if your soil temps have already warmed up to the low mid 60's. Other than that I don't see how products applied now will have any visible effect for another 30 days. It will take that long just to get into the plants system.
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  #32  
Old 02-08-2011, 09:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Az Gardener View Post
I respectfully disagree. Fertilizer applied now will take at least 30 days to get into the plant and become active depending on soil temperatures. If you are applying a high N product I agree you will be more likely to get that big push of fleshy growth that is more susceptible to pests. I am not suggesting a high N product.

My disclaimer is if you are doing foilar applications and you have some green tissue left or if your soil temps have already warmed up to the low mid 60's. Other than that I don't see how products applied now will have any visible effect for another 30 days. It will take that long just to get into the plants system.
AZ

I believe you are missing the point that our climates are different. Air Temperatures might be in the same or close range. But GROUND TEMPERATURE are different. Because we have more moisture our ground does not go below the high 60's in winter. Our real Tropicals don't start growing until the Ground is 80 or above. Water holds heat and moist soil will stay warmer longer in Cold Air Temperature. See my post about Running irrigation all day before a expected freeze. By the same theory, dry ground warms faster than wet or moist ground.

You bring up a good point about Ground temperature because it is a BIG factor in plant growth. More so than Air Temperature. Now our very hot sun and normals highs this Spring of mid 80's for the tourist, will in fact give a surface ground temperature of close to 120 or higher and quickly raise our ground temperature to the magic 80 degrees for our tropicals.

I understand where you are coming from and welcome your reply. Theory is theory whether North or South, East or West, But please remember weather is different and plays a big big factor.
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  #33  
Old 02-08-2011, 12:18 PM
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Landscape Poet Landscape Poet is offline
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Ric,

Answer this - currently the soil temps in YOUR area are in the low 70's. Assuming that temps continue to increase in the next week or two and the soil temps get to mid 70's. If you are applying a slow release formula such as 90% slow release. Would it not be about perfect timing? Just as the turf is waking up, the nutrients would be just begin to really start becoming available.
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  #34  
Old 02-08-2011, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Michael Geist Yard Works View Post
Ric,

Answer this - currently the soil temps in YOUR area are in the low 70's. Assuming that temps continue to increase in the next week or two and the soil temps get to mid 70's. If you are applying a slow release formula such as 90% slow release. Would it not be about perfect timing? Just as the turf is waking up, the nutrients would be just begin to really start becoming available.
mikey

With all the cold stress those plants need fed. I will use what I always do which is a 50% slow release. Ornamentals have larger roots and more storage than grass. Therefore any fast release will still be up taken and stored if not used right away. Spring flush is important for plants to get off on the correct start for the year
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